How Do We Teach Our Children About Racism?

Donate

Please support destee.com, the oldest, most respectful, online black community in the world - PayPal or CashApp - Thank you.

river

Watch Her Flow
REGISTERED MEMBER
Mar 22, 2004
6,415
1,271
Where the Niger meets the Nile
Occupation
Author
When I read brotha Blackbird's response to brotha Kemetkind's thread telling us how five Native American tribes enslaved Africans I was like man, we're like the doorknob of the world--everybody gets a turn. If I had the mind of a 9 year old how could I feel proud of belonging to a group that everyone in the world has messed over? How could I feel love for a god who has allowed me to be messed over over and over again? How could I desire universal oneness in a world with white people in it?

Now my niece is 10 years old and my sister has embarked on telling her about her African and Native American (her paternal grandmother is full blooded which is why she has loose wavey hair) heritages. I am thinking about sharing with them some of the things being shared here at Destee. But I am wondering how do I do that without giving her a sense of hopelessness and shame?
 

Edward Williams

Well-Known Member
REGISTERED MEMBER
Jan 14, 2006
874
60
Right here!
Occupation
Produce Justice
river said:
When I read brotha Blackbird's response to brotha Kemetkind's thread telling us how five Native American tribes enslaved Africans I was like man, we're like the doorknob of the world--everybody gets a turn. If I had the mind of a 9 year old how could I feel proud of belonging to a group that everyone in the world has messed over? How could I feel love for a god who has allowed me to be messed over over and over again? How could I desire universal oneness in a world with white people in it?

Now my niece is 10 years old and my sister has embarked on telling her about her African and Native American (her paternal grandmother is full blooded which is why she has loose wavey hair) heritages. I am thinking about sharing with them some of the things being shared here at Destee. But I am wondering how do I do that without giving her a sense of hopelessness and shame?
Tell her the truth.

Explain to her that the white people who practice racism (white supremacy) have a method of controlling ALL people THEY SAY are not white (non-white). This includes the people that are called African and the people that are called Native American. Both of these so called groups of people are non-white, meaning they are not white people.

Go on to say that the white people who practice racism (white supremacy) use a method of controlling non-white people by pointing all of their arrows at the people THEY SAY are non-white and getting the arrows of the people THEY SAY are non-white to point all of their arrows at each other. This is also something we call "Divide and Conquer". The white people who practice racism (white supremacy) enslaved the so-called Native Americans and also enslaved the so-called Africans. It was only when the so-called Native Americans began to enslave the so-called Africans, meaning the Native Americans helped the white people who practice racism (white supremacy), it was only then that the white people who practice racism (white supremacy) began to refer to the so-called Native Americans who did this as "The Civilized Tribes".

Don't take it out on the so-called Native Americans...we all help the white people who practice racism (white supremacy) in some form or fashion. There is no way to be a prisoner in a prison without helping the warden of the prison. Just by the fact that you are in the prison you are helping the warden. All the more reason to tear down the prison.

How do you tear down the prison? Knowing how the white people who practice racism (white supremacy) do what they do, meaning what we call "Divide and Conquer"...meaning keep the people THEY SAY are not white (non-white) in conflict with each other...in order to work against them you have to make sure ALL of your interaction with other non-white people is constructive. This means you have to minimize conflict between you and other non-white people at all times by maximizing constructive interaction. If you cannot minimize conflict by maximizing constructive interaction you have to minimize conflict by minimizing contact. This simply means if your interaction with other non-white people is not constructive, meaning you are helping them to solve a problem or they are not helping you to solve a problem stay away from each other until you can help each other.

If the so-called Native Americans and the so-called Africans had practiced this small strategy the so-called Africans would not have been slaves and the so-called Native Americans would not have been slave owners...because they would've been helping each other rather than harming each other. Then the white people who practice racism (white supremacy) will have to find another way to keep the Africans and the Native Americans in conflict with each other. Meaning, you will make their job extremely difficult if not impossible.

Stay focused on what you can do about what you learn about the past and do it. Don't get all emotionally involved in the past. Learn from it and act like you learned from it by doing what is necessary to do to see to it that the past doesn't repeat itself. If you don't learn from the past and act like you’ve learned from the past by doing what needs to be done...it will repeat itself.
 

Zulile

Well-Known Member
REGISTERED MEMBER
Jun 24, 2007
3,282
100
Occupation
HR/Finance
river said:
When I read brotha Blackbird's response to brotha Kemetkind's thread telling us how five Native American tribes enslaved Africans I was like man, we're like the doorknob of the world--everybody gets a turn. If I had the mind of a 9 year old how could I feel proud of belonging to a group that everyone in the world has messed over? How could I feel love for a god who has allowed me to be messed over over and over again? How could I desire universal oneness in a world with white people in it?

Now my niece is 10 years old and my sister has embarked on telling her about her African and Native American (her paternal grandmother is full blooded which is why she has loose wavey hair) heritages. I am thinking about sharing with them some of the things being shared here at Destee. But I am wondering how do I do that without giving her a sense of hopelessness and shame?

good question sister river. I think it is important to teach the history - but perhaps the method of teaching needs to be adapted to include more positivity - slavery is overwhelmingly negative - but the black nation is moving forward doing amazing things - slavery hasnt ended - but we still progress.

borrowing the lesson learnt in oldsoul's class this past Sunday - I close my eyes and captured the first image that comes to mind when I hear the word.. Indian (Native American) - and you know what it is? A proud cheif in a crown of feathers. How did that get there? The image should have been reservation living, poor, drunkards, casino loving, traditional hating folk. thats the sterotype, right? Besides, how do I see pride in a people that have been practically wiped out? but feel shame for my own that continue to gain strength?

This afternoon I listened to oldsouls recording about "the Black Belt that should have been" and was stunned to know just how darn creative and successful Black America has been during and beyond slavery - and how evil the systems on place have been/are still.

I think we can and should teach the history of slavery to children - with an eye on the big prize - building pride and strength of what didnt kill us, despite the arsenal of attack, which succesfully wiped (and continues to wipe) out other ethnic groups.

If you dont want a child feeling ashamed about her heritage, dont give her something to be ashamed about. Black America is a success story in the making. Give her a role instead!

eta - wasnt bashing the Native American - just demonstrating how an unbalanced teaching distorts.. but you knew that ;)
 

FaithSoulSistah

Well-Known Member
REGISTERED MEMBER
Oct 20, 2007
256
6
Zulile said:
good question sister river. I think it is important to teach the history - but perhaps the method of teaching needs to be adapted to include more positivity - slavery is overwhelmingly negative - but the black nation is moving forward doing amazing things - slavery hasnt ended - but we still progress.

borrowing the lesson learnt in oldsoul's class this past Sunday - I close my eyes and captured the first image that comes to mind when I hear the word.. Indian (Native American) - and you know what it is? A proud cheif in a crown of feathers. How did that get there? The image should have been reservation living, poor, drunkards, casino loving, traditional hating folk. thats the sterotype, right? Besides, how do I see pride in a people that have been practically wiped out? but feel shame for my own that continue to gain strength?

This afternoon I listened to oldsouls recording about "the Black Belt that should have been" and was stunned to know just how darn creative and successful Black America has been during and beyond slavery - and how evil the systems on place have been/are still.

I think we can and should teach the history of slavery to children - with an eye on the big prize - building pride and strength of what didnt kill us, despite the arsenal of attack, which succesfully wiped (and continues to wipe) out other ethnic groups.

If you dont want a child feeling ashamed about her heritage, dont give her something to be ashamed about. Black America is a success story in the making. Give her a role instead!

eta - wasnt bashing the Native American - just demonstrating how an unbalanced teaching distorts.. but you knew that ;)

You're right. The negativity is a big issue. I spoke to my godson awhile back and he told me "The only thing they teach you about black people is slavery." Now I'm sure they teach other things during Black History month, but you can see what is standing out in his mind. I read a couple of stories from Dr. Claud Anderson's "Dirty Little Secret" book and he was interested. But I slacked off on talking to him regularly and telling him the positive things in our history. So yesterday I got a call from his mother about how bad his grades were. I know I have to do something because his mother is not enlightened. She puts the responsibility solely on him and does not monitor his progress like she should.

I decided to send him weekly emails with links to positive stories that I come across during the week and other black history facts. The positivity forum here is really great.

If we don't have balance in regards to the messages we receive about ourselves, then our kids certainly don't. So I'm doing something about it as best I can. This is a very bright and intelligent child, but he is not motivated. I have to do what I can to help him even though I am out of state now.
 

Latest profile posts

Hi! I'm not as active on this account as I want to be. For one I tend to forget that this site exists until I check my email. Two, I'm currently in the process of building up a fine art site for Oklahoma black and native historical references. The references correlate with another site that will be a storytelling site that has not yet been produced.
Happy to be back and gaining more knowledge!
Destee wrote on Cindy's profile.
Welcome Home Beloved! :wave: :love:
skuderjaymes wrote on Cindy's profile.
good to see you around Cindy.
2022 Has started and I hope everyone is having a safe and protected journey as we navigate this game of life
during this pandemic. We are not easily defeated so protect your momentum at all times. One Love.
Top