Jails / Prisons : How Do We Keep Young Black Men From Going To Prison?

RAPTOR

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Everything ain't for everybody. I'm not sure folks realize that. What is cool for devils is not cool for us. But know one make this Knowledge Born to the masses.
...And we are speaking with respect to entitlements, or the sense of?
 

Keita Kenyatta

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What, exactly, does this mean? I assume that by "calling it what it is", you mean calling it racism, but what do you mean by handling our business accordingly? What, exactly, would this mean as far as "How do we keep young black men from going to prison?" What goal or path are you referring to and what tangible objective are you suggesting we move towards in the act of handling our business accordingly?

Excuse me...but I can't answer your question based upon there not being enough information about you. Are you male,female? Young or older? From America or some place else? These type of questions I just asked you allows me to understand "how to address you and what you experience and perceptions may or may not be based upon age.". It allows me to do the same based upon gender. It allows me to do the same based upon where you were raised. How a black woman both young or older perceives is different than a black male. I think you get what I'm saying.
 

Full Speed

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Excuse me...but I can't answer your question based upon there not being enough information about you. Are you male,female? Young or older? From America or some place else? These type of questions I just asked you allows me to understand "how to address you and what you experience and perceptions may or may not be based upon age.". It allows me to do the same based upon gender. It allows me to do the same based upon where you were raised. How a black woman both young or older perceives is different than a black male. I think you get what I'm saying.
Brother, we are all in this thing together. This has nothing to do with me and everything to do with US, the collective.
This tread is entitled "How do WE keep YOUNG BLACK MEN from going to prison?"

Your answer was that we needed to "call it what it is" and that we needed to "handle OUR business accordingly". Why do you need to know my life story to answer the question which is "What, EXACTLY, does this mean?" What, exactly, about my life story is going to help you answer the question of what your suggestion mean to US (the collective) and how it will effect change?

I am looking for collective solutions, you offered one. I am simply asking you to clarify what your solution means at the grass roots level. It is not a trick question, just a sincere inquiry.
 

Full Speed

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Bro. Kenyatta,

I also asked:
What goal or path are you referring to and what tangible objective are you suggesting we move towards in the act of handling our business accordingly?


Again, I don't see how you being aware of my gender, age, or anything else can be of assistance to you in addressing this question which is clearly relative to us all as a collective people. If I am missing a relevent connection, please patiently clearify how this information can be helpful. Otherwise, I look forward to your answer to the question as it stands.
 

Ankhur

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Let's be honest Black men have not collectively brought a paradigm to Black youth to follow on a collective basis for over 400 years, and until we do then prison will continue to be as the rap songs chant and hynotize;

A rights of passage!

I grew up middle class and saw came back from college and saw young high school brothers, some whose parents owned 2 homes and made well over 6 figures combined,

in jail for multiple homicides, some armed robbery, and some dead.

We realy are not looking at the psychology of this issue, either ours or the youths
 

Full Speed

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Let's be honest Black men have not collectively brought a paradigm to Black youth to follow on a collective basis for over 400 years, and until we do then prison will continue to be as the rap songs chant and hynotize;

A rights of passage!

I grew up middle class and saw came back from college and saw young high school brothers, some whose parents owned 2 homes and made well over 6 figures combined,

in jail for multiple homicides, some armed robbery, and some dead.

We realy are not looking at the psychology of this issue, either ours or the youths
We must also be honest with the fact that 85% of all prison inmates are from fatherless homes.

The situation with brothers from stable, two parent households in jail for multiple homicides, robbery, etc is far and away the EXCEPTION rather than the rule.
 

Ankhur

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We must also be honest with the fact that 85% of all prison inmates are from fatherless homes.

The situation with brothers from stable, two parent households in jail for multiple homicides, robbery, etc is far and away the EXCEPTION rather than the rule.
I respect you brother but , I myself would prefer to discuss things that we can change, now if you know a awy to go inside the homes of folks and force brothers to act responsible, or in some cases force the sisters to stop doing what if forceing the brothers away, then present it please,
but here the things that can be done my large masses of the community are and should,
IMHO be paramount,
and as stated before if the Nguzo Saba is instiled at a young age then there will be no brocken homes, but to rail about what you or I cannot change or effect , I don't understand.
Look at the crime wave that had occured in Black universities over guns and drugs during the 80s,
a fad is a fad and no matter how hard parents sacrifice for a child many will go with their peers rather then their parents, and to be honest, I think the president as well as hundreds of thousand of otheryoung Black men from broken homes are not only successful but prosperous and are doing well with good grades in universities as well, and those statistics should be looked at as well
 

Full Speed

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I respect you brother but , I myself would prefer to discuss things that we can change, now if you know a awy to go inside the homes of folks and force brothers to act responsible, or in some cases force the sisters to stop doing what if forceing the brothers away, then present it please,
but here the things that can be done my large masses of the community are and should,
IMHO be paramount,
and as stated before if the Nguzo Saba is instiled at a young age then there will be no brocken homes, but to rail about what you or I cannot change or effect , I don't understand.
Look at the crime wave that had occured in Black universities over guns and drugs during the 80s,
a fad is a fad and no matter how hard parents sacrifice for a child many will go with their peers rather then their parents, and to be honest, I think the president as well as hundreds of thousand of otheryoung Black men from broken homes are not only successful but prosperous and are doing well with good grades in universities as well, and those statistics should be looked at as well
We can change ANYTHING we set our minds to change. The best place to instill ANYTHING into our youth is in a stable home. So, you have created a catch 22. You suggest that instilling Nguzo Saba at a young age will eliminate broken homes, but yet you insist we can do nothing to encourage people to act responsibly. This is a conflict within itself.

Where do you propose we instill Nguzo Saba into our youth, at a public school? Through some government program? Through a church? How do we instill anything into our youth without it being reinforced in the home?
 

Ankhur

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We can change ANYTHING we set our minds to change. The best place to instill ANYTHING into our youth is in a stable home. So, you have created a catch 22. You suggest that instilling Nguzo Saba at a young age will eliminate broken homes, but yet you insist we can do nothing to encourage people to act responsibly. This is a conflict within itself.

Where do you propose we instill Nguzo Saba into our youth, at a public school? Through some government program? Through a church? How do we instill anything into our youth without it being reinforced in the home?
hold up , take a deep breath and relax

point one you brought up future delinquent dads or presently existing ones?

point 2 if you brought up presently existing dead beat dads how do you plan to get somwe one to do something they refuse to?
And explain how as men outside of these families can force these men to return and do the right thing

I would prefer to deal with practical matters and the majority of the beginnings of hip hop were propasgated underground which means anything can, wheter postive or negative
 

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