Black People : How do Black New Yorkers feel about the charter school system?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Oct 5, 2010.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    open for discussion
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    African Americans For Charter Schools


    Paul Peterson of the Hoover Institution and Martin West of Harvard University's Graduate School of Education pen an op-ed piece in the Wall Street Journal wondering why black liberal leadership is opposed to charter schools, given black support: is on the rise: (hat tip: Democrats for Education Reform): "Support for charters among African Americans rose to 49% in 2009, up from 42% in 2008. This year it leapt upward to no less than 64%. Among Hispanics support jumped to 47% in 2010, from 37% in 2008. Opposition to charters is expressed by 14% of African-Americans and 21% of Hispanics. Twenty-three percent of African-Americans and 33% of Hispanics take a neutral position. Among the public as a whole, charter supporters currently outnumber opponents by a margin of better than 2 to 1. Forty-four percent say they are in favor of charters, while 19% stand in opposition. Parents in general are even more supportive of charter schools: 51% like them, 15% don't."

    More: "The NAACP and its sister organizations are correct that charters are 'overrepresented' in minority communities. But they neglected to find out what parents in those communities actually think about that fact. As it turns out, parents in communities with charter schools favor them by a margin of 57% to 16%. Meanwhile, charter support among public school teachers has slipped to 39% in 2010, from 47% in 2008. Teachers unions know how to mobilize their constituency. The same cannot be said for the NAACP. It's time civil-rights groups listened to their communities."

    http://www.bookerrising.net/2010/08/african-americans-for-charter-schools.html
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Can All-Male High Schools Boost African-American Boys' Graduation Rates?
    By Joie Jager-Hyman Tuesday, Jul 28 2009

    In 2004, David Banks, a former lawyer and assistant principal at a public school in Brooklyn, joined forces with other members of the African-American philanthropic organization 100 Black Men to address what they saw as the appallingly low rates of high school graduation for African-American males in New York City. Their solution: the Eagle Academy for Young Men, a charter school on East 164th Street in the South Bronx that became the first all-male public school in New York City in 30 years.

    The school's mission, as described by Banks, was to close both the racial and gender gap in education by reaching out to boys of color who were falling through the cracks. "We're looking for the young men who would be outside on the street corner, outside of the school," he says. "We work with really challenging kids."


    http://www.villagevoice.com/2009-07...boost-african-american-boys-graduation-rates/
     
  4. Mikha'el

    Mikha'el Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    if it helps my generation im all for it
     
  5. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    See this is the point , what the articles does not say is that only a small percentage fo the communities children are selected by lottery.


    And if they are aware of systems of education, as in the Chicago Young men's Acadamy,
    that can excel a cross section of children regardless of entrance grades, why not replicate that system throughout the entire public school sysem?
    In the case in Harlem for instance only 12% of children get selected.

    what happens to the other 88%? and at a time when schools are closing, there are no longer school buses for young children, and the debate is on as th whethere or not the bus and train pass system will continue, and parents must shell out almost 5 bucks per day for thier child's transportation.
     
  6. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    If it only helps 12 percent of a disenfranchised community then how does it help a generation?
    Also check the actual statistics of national effectiveness of the education these schools provide
     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Could you please provide some support for this statement?
     
  8. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    My apologies it was on several showings of like it Is , CBS and ABC news, as most folks are aware here in NYC.

    Harlem kids win big in school lottery
    June 10, 2010 By Joanne
    Winning the lottery to get into the Harlem Success Academy charter school is a very big win indeed, concludes a University of Pennsylvania study by Jonathan Supovitz and Sam Rikoon, education professors.

    Students who won the first-grade lottery were compared to students who applied but lost out and stayed in district-run schools. By third grade, the HSA students performed 48 points higher in math and 35 points higher in reading than the lottery losers. That’s roughly 13 percent higher.

    HSA students scored 19 percent higher than similar third graders in neighborhood schools.

    Harlem Success Academy is featured in two new documentaries, The Lottery and Waiting for Superman, notes Education News.

    Both films view the enrollment lottery from the eyes of parents who believe that winning a spot in the high performing public charter school is the key to their child’s future.

    Which may be true.

    Last year, 7,000 students applied for 1,100 spaces at Success Academy schools in Harlem and the South Bronx. That means there are a lot of motivated parents whose children lost the lottery.

     
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