Black People : Honoring Malcolm X

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by JRS Writer, May 12, 2003.

  1. JRS Writer

    JRS Writer Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    POSITIVELY BLACK
    Junious Ricardo Stanton
    Honoring Malcolm X

    "We have a common enemy. We have this in common. We have a common oppressor, a common exploiter and a common discriminator. But once we realize that we have a common enemy, then we can unite-on the basis of what we have n common. And what we have foremost in common is that enemy-the white man. He's an enemy to all of us. I know some of you all think that some of them aren't enemies. Time will tell." Malcolm X 1954

    As we pause to remember and pay homage to the life and legacy of MalcolmX Let us remember those things about him we can emulate and let us apply them in our daily lives. Ironically the United States government which plotted and killed Malcolm through its FBI COINTELPRO and military counterinsurgency programs now hail him as a hero and even printed a stamp in his honor. Despite this blatant co-option Malcolm is a real hero, a role model a man who was on task and on purpose. I attended an historic summit at Gratersford prison a few weeks ago and one of the members of the Gratersford chapter of Lifers Inc spoke about what he called the Malcolm X paradigm of social transformation. What he meant was that ex-offenders who turn their lives around in prison will be coming back into the community working with grassroots community groups to help stem the tide of crime and sociopathic values and behavior and assist young brothers in channeling their energies into more positive endeavors. This is what Malcolm X did through the Nation of Islam and later when he organized the Organization of Afro-American Unity. Malcolm came from a race conscious family. His father and mother were active Garveyites. Their Black Nationalist pro-African leanings stuck with him and the message of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad and the Nation of Islam he heard in prison rekindled the flame that had been dying out as "Detroit Red" as Malcolm was known in his pimp, hustler and street criminal days embarked on a life of crime and anti-social behavior. The Nation of Islam resurrected Malcolm, under its influence he developed self-discipline, renewed his thirst for learning and his dormant love for black people blossomed. Malcolm came out of prison on fire for the NOI and eventually became its national spokesman. However review of Malcolm's speeches especially following the police murder of several Muslim brothers in LA reveal a shift in Malcolm's thinking. He no longer followed the script set down by Elijah Muhammad that their God Allah would punish the white man the Muslims called "the blue eyed devil".
    His views set the stage for his eventual estrangement, separation from the Nation of Islam and his subsequent assassination. For us Malcolm X exemplifies the transforming power resident within all of us, our ability to respond to a call (either external or internal) to seek ones' higher self and a higher calling in service to humanity. Malcolm's keen wit, his analytical mind, his quest for knowledge and love of truth utterly destroyed the hold white supremacy had on him. In public debates he made men with PhDs look and sound stupid. He un-nerved black people with his message of black empowerment. When virulent violence, economic and social reprisals against black protest and resistance made black men afraid to stand up against white oppression, the NOI and Malcolm boldly asserted white people were the enemies of people of color. It was Malcolm who spearheaded the establishment of Muhammad Speaks the most powerful newspaper of its time because it was global in scope and it was unashamedly black in its editorial content.
    Malcolm represents the best in black manhood, husband, father and an uncompromising commitment to the struggle for human rights and dignity. That is why the AmeriKKKan ruling elites murdered him. As we pause from our mundane activities let us reflect on Malcolm's courage, his compassion and his commitment to the struggle. Let us remember we have a common enemy.
    The face the enemy shows to us may be different but their motives and MO remain the same. Malcolm was clear on who they were, he saw through their lies and deceit and he exposed their tricknology. He courageously urged us on continue the fight even when he knew we was being stalked and under threat of death. Let us value ourselves and our people in such a way we live our lives in the same uncompromising and committed fashion. That is the most fitting tribute we can pay to Malcolm and all the other ancestors who've struggled on our behalf.
     
  2. poeticdelight

    poeticdelight Member MEMBER

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    an adherent of M.L.K

    there were large-scale political differences between these two men.

    because I am a product of M.L.K's vision through those who started establishing foundations based on his vision, I stick and stand by it firmly.

    Malcolm's statement:

    "And what we have foremost in common is that enemy-the white man. He's an enemy to all of us. I know some of you all think that some of them aren't enemies. Time will tell." Malcolm X 1954"

    Martin Luther Kings paraphrased:

    All white men are not evil and besides we cannot build this vision on our own.

    PoeticDelight's evaluation:

    I agree with Malcolm X that they are enemies to me because of what has happened to our people and what we are still going through today. However, we reaped what we sow. When the African chief made his choice, it created a division. We know this division as a divide between the haves and the have nots. The people with the highest hierachy usually have the power to make decisions regarding the allocation of money and other valuables. Focus more on who shares the same common vision rather than their racial color and level of prestige.
     
  3. JRS Writer

    JRS Writer Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    MLK and Malcolm weren't that far off in their assessment about AmeriKKKa. Check out some of MLK's later statements especially his opposition to US imperialism in IndoChina (Viet Nam, Laos, Cambodia and Thailand), the military industrial complex, US apartheid and wealth inequity. MLK understood that racism was deeply entrenched in the AmeriKKKan psyche and said so many times. Check out the history of the last 500 years, everywhere on the planet white men go, war, disease, race and color discrimination and massive social and ecological disruption follows. Is that a coincidence or does it say something about them?

    Take a look at what is happening in Iraq and what just happened in Afghanistan and you'll get some idea what happened in Africa. Many of the "chiefs" you referred to in your post were not real chiefs of tribes or nations. Many were Africans propped up by the Europeans just as puppets are being propped up in Iraq and Afghanistan. This is not to say Africans are blameless, however once you discover how the white man operates (we all are creatures of habit) you can predict his future behavior. This is why the study of history is so important.
     
  4. poeticdelight

    poeticdelight Member MEMBER

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    that's not my point

    my point is I agree with the vision of M.L.K more than Malcolm X
    irregardless to how you want to defend his political role and position in the black community

    there is nothing wrong with you believing in Malcolm X's political stance

    but you should respect that I'm an adherent of M.L.K's policy and M.L.K's policy only

    just like I respect your position as an adherent of Malcolm X who is not my role model it's nothing personal

    peace

    pd
     
  5. poeticdelight

    poeticdelight Member MEMBER

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    well since i'm an adherent of M.L.K

    then both of you are on the same team with me

    good deal : )

    pd

    :heart:
     
  6. JRS Writer

    JRS Writer Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Great, that makes the team that much stronger. Brother Jucuma's analogy is perfect, we are a team, sometimes squads within the team have different functions and orientations but their overarching objective is to support the whole team and win.
    I didn't take offense to your position nor did I take any disagreement we may have personally. I don't claim infallibility. I can learn from you and we can learn from each other. Stay strong, the struggle intensifies.
    Junious
     
  7. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Sister Poetic:

    Since I know you are a fan of the written word. I would recommend that you read "Malcolm & Martin & America" by James Cone. This book discusses the changing views of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King from the 1950s to their deaths in the 1960s. Neither man ended up where he started, and both were closer in their beliefs than you might think. Good Reading!
     
  8. JRS Writer

    JRS Writer Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I already have that book, you are right Mr. Cone does a good job chronicling their respective growth and development as men and leaders.
    Junious
     
  9. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    A big thumbs up and much respect to both men. Without either one, where would Black Americans be today? I shudder the thought! Thank God that someone had the courage to speak up and speak out! Let's be even more thankful that some of us listened and are still focusing on their powerful messages and acknowledging their courage to live and die for what they believed in. Great examples--both men.

    Thank you brother Junious for posting this message. It's a wonderful testimony to Malcolm X.
     
  10. JRS Writer

    JRS Writer Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thank you for your kind words.
    The struggle intensifies,
    Junious
     
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