Black People : Honoring Black Women/ takes More then a month!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Apr 1, 2011.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Mary Lou Williams

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    interview


    "Credo"


    Mary Lou Williams (May 8, 1910 – May 28, 1981) was an American jazz pianist, composer, and arranger. Williams wrote hundreds of compositions and arrangements, and recorded more than one hundred records (in 78, 45, and LP versions).[1] Williams wrote and arranged for such bandleaders as Duke Ellington and Benny Goodman, and she was friend, mentor, and teacher to Thelonious Monk, Charlie Parker, and Dizzy Gillespie.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Lou_Williams


    www.marylouwilliamsfoundation.org
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Of course it does. it should be a daily devotion of and to each other....but some people need a "reminder" err-now-and-then.
     
  3. Corvo

    Corvo navigator of live MEMBER

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    I Honor Black Women every day of the year.
     
  4. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Martha Collins

    [​IMG]



    1979


    Marva N. Collins
    Biography

    Marva Collins grew up in Atmore, Alabama at a time when segregation was the rule. Black people were not permitted to use the public library, and her schools had few books, and no indoor plumbing. Nonetheless, her family instilled in her an awareness of the family's historical excellence and helped develop her strong desire for learning, achievement and independence. After graduating from Clark College in Atlanta, Georgia, she taught school in Alabama for two years. She moved to Chicago and taught in Chicago's public school system for fourteen years.

    Her experiences in that system, coupled with her dissatisfaction with the quality of education that her two youngest children were receiving in prestigious private schools, convinced her that children deserved better than what was passing for acceptable education. That conviction led to her decision to open her own school on the second floor of her home. She took the $5,000 balance in her school pension fund and began her educational program with an enrollment of her own two children and four other neighborhood youngsters.

    Thus, Westside Preparatory School was founded in 1975 in Garfield Park, a Chicago inner-city area. During the first year, Marva took in learning disabled, problem children and even one child who had been labeled by Chicago public school authorities as borderline retarded. At the end of the first year, every child scored at least five grades higher proving that the previous labels placed on these children were misguided. The CBS program, 60 Minutes, visited her school for the second time in 1996. That little girl who had been labeled as border line retarded, graduated in 1976 from college Summa Cum Laude. It was documented on the 60 Minutes programs in 1996. Marva's graduates have entered some of the nation's finest colleges and universities, such as Harvard, Yale, and Stanford, to mention just a few. And, they have become physicians, lawyers, engineers, educators, and entered other professions.



    http://www.marvacollins.com/biography.html
     
  5. Corvo

    Corvo navigator of live MEMBER

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    I love it, it's too bad it's going the other way.
     
  6. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    When an architect puts all of their effort , talent and creativity in designing a building,

    rarely do they know what the manager , owner and tenants of that building will do with it.

    This thread was made at the end of women's history month, to show that every month ,
    of the year we as Black people have something to post about honoring Black women, that folks can add other sisters to the
    same concept to

    the Honoring dark skinned blacks thread was made
     
  7. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    [​IMG]

    Her fight against British colonialists is a story is woven throughout the history of Ghana. A story from Ghana , A History for Primary Schools, E.A. Addy; In the evening the chiefs held a secret meeting at Kumasi. Yaa Asantewaa the Queen Mother of Ejisu, was at the meeting. The chiefs were discussing how they should make war on the white men and force them to bring back the Asantehene. Yaa Asantewaa saw that some of the chiefs were afraid. Some said that there should be no war. They should rather go to beg the Governor to bring back the Asantehene King(Nana) Prempeh.

    Then suddenly Yaa Asantewaa stood up and spoke. This was what she said:

    "Now I have seen that some of you fear to go forward to fight for our king. If it were in the brave days of, the days of Osei Tutu, Okomfo Anokye, and Opoku Ware, chiefs would not sit down to see thier king taken away without firing a shot. No white man could have dared to speak to chief of the Ashanti in the way the Governor spoke to you chiefs this morning. Is it true that the bravery of the Ashanti is no more? I cannot believe it. It cannot be! I must say this: if you the men of Ashanti will not go forward, then we will. We the women will. I shall call upon my fellow women.

    We will fight the white men. We will fight till the last of us falls in the battlefields."
    This speech stirred up the men who took an oath to fight the white men until they released the Asantehene. For months the Ashantis led by Yaa Asantewaa fought very bravely and kept the white men in the fort. Yet British reinforcements totaling 1,400 soldiers arrived at Kumasi. Yaa Asantewa and other leaders were capturedand sent into exile. Yaa Asantewaa's war was the last of the major war in Africa led by a women.



    Source: Ghana-world.fromger

    http://mail-sg4.msntv.msn.com/apps/mail/listfolder.aspx


    As Black men, IMHO we are more then honored , all to have a Yaa Asantewaa, in our environment whether it was an elder in the community , our grands and great grands our immediate family, our significant other, some sister on the job or in our community, or a Black teacher ,

    who never says

    in regards to the hell that Black folks are catching:

    "well that's the way things are"

    but instead says

    "doggone it you and I where not raised like this and we sure as hell are going to do something about this to correct these violations, together"
     
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