Black History Culture : History's Lost Black Towns

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Amnat77, Feb 11, 2011.

  1. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Fort Mose, Fla.: The First 'Emancipation Proclamation'
    Courtesy of Black Past

    Founded in 1738, Fort Mose, located just north of St. Augustine, is the United States' first free black settlement. Amid the fight for control of the New World, Great Britain, Spain and other European nations relied on African slave labor. The king of Spain issued an edict: Any male slave of the British colonies who escaped to the Spanish colony of Florida would be set free -- as long as he declared his allegiance to Spain and the Catholic Church. The settlement was abandoned when the British took possession of Florida in 1763


    http://www.theroot.com/multimedia/lost-black-cities
     
  2. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Rosewood, Fla.: A Massacre That Won't Be Forgotten

    established in 1870, was the site of what could be considered one of the worst race riots in U.S. history. By 1915 it was a small, predominantly black town -- with a population of just slightly more than 300. On New Year's Day in 1923, a young white woman claimed that a black man sexually assaulted her; Rosewood was destroyed by a band of white men searching for the alleged suspect. The number of those killed is still unknown.

    http://www.theroot.com/multimedia/lost-black-cities
     
  3. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Seneca Village, N.Y.: Taking a Stroll Through History

    Located between 82nd and 89th streets and Seventh and Eighth avenues is Manhattan's first community of prominent black property owners. The New York State census estimated that about 264 residents lived in Seneca Village between 1825 and 1857. The area consisted of three churches, a school and several cemeteries. All was razed -- and the history erased -- with the development of Central Park.
     
  4. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Five Points District, N.Y.: High Stakes in Lower Manhattan

    Today we know it as Wall Street, but from the 1830s to the 1860s, this area was the site of Manhattan's first free black settlement. Located on the five-cornered intersection of what were then Anthony, Cross, Orange and Little Water streets, it also became known as a notorious slum, with its dance halls, bars, gambling and prostitution. Many blacks fled the area to escape the draft riots of 1863.
     
  5. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Weeksville, N.Y.: A Refuge for Southerners and Northerners

    What is now Bedford-Stuyvesant in Brooklyn, N.Y., Weeksville was the second-largest community for free blacks prior to the Civil War. James Weeks, a freed slave, purchased a significant amount of land from Henry C. Thompson, another freed slave. Weeks sold property to new residents, who eventually named the community after him. It thrived over the years, becoming home to both Southern blacks fleeing slavery and Northern blacks escaping the racial violence and draft riots in New York and other cities.
     
  6. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Blackdom, N.M.: The Black Ghost Town

    Located southwest of Roswell, Blackdom, established by Frank and Ella Louise Boyer, was the first all-black settlement in New Mexico. The heyday for the town was around 1908, when there were about 300 residents. They had set up a post office, a blacksmith, stores, a hotel and the Blackdom Baptist Church, which also served as the schoolhouse. By the 1920s a severe drought led settlers to abandon the town.
     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Fazendeville was a small community in Saint Bernard Parish, Louisiana (USA) which was dismantled in the 1960s.
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    1951 United States Geological Surveymap showing Fazendeville and its geographic relationship to the Chalmette Battleground and the town of Chalmette.

    Fazendeville was located on land that had been a portion of the battlefield of The Battle of New Orleans, between the Chalmette National Cemetery and the Chalmette monument.
    In 1854 the land was listed as part of the succession of Jean Pierre Fazende, a "free man of color", and was inherited by his son of the same name. At the end of the American Civil Warthe younger Fazende divided what had been agricultural land into lots and sold them to recently freed slaves.
    The African-American community was started by 1867, with the Battle Ground Baptist Church established on 16 April 1868.
    The self-contained community had its own general stores, a one-room schoolhouse which taught first through eighth grades, two benevolent societies and the Battle Ground Baptist Church. The main street was Fazendeville Road, which ran from St. Bernard Highway to the River Road which formerly ran along the base of the Mississippi levee.
    The community ended in 1964 when the St. Bernard Parish Government expropriated the rights to the land for expansion of the park around the battlefield site. Allegations were made at the time (and continue to be made) that the expropriation was motivated at least as much to displace the Parish's largest concentration of African Americans as for need to expand the park.
    More than 50 families were forced to relocate when the National Park Service obtained the land. Fazendeville Road was closed on 24 November 1964 and the demolition of Fazendeville was completed in 1966.
    Some of those families relocated to the Lower 9th Ward of New Orleans, and built a new "Battleground Baptist Church" there in 1964. That area was severely damaged in Hurricane Betsy in 1965 and even more so by the Hurricane Katrina levee failure disaster of 2005.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fazendeville,_Louisiana
     
  8. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Frank and Ella Boyer.

    image.jpg
     
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