Black People : Hip Hop: The culture that never changes

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Knowledge Seed, Oct 11, 2008.

  1. Knowledge Seed

    Knowledge Seed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    In today's society, most are under the impression that Hip Hop is a recent phenomena that began in 1973. In fact, more often then not, people over the age of 50, will say that Hip Hop is what is destroying the minds of Black youth. Are they sure that's not 'rap' doing that? Do most people even know that there is a difference between the two(rap and hip hop)? I doubt it.

    No matter where we go, the one thing we never leave behind is our culture. Even in the harshest of situations, it always seems to resurface itself, but in a different form. I know most think that there is little to nothing African about Blacks in America. But on the contrary, there is something very African about them.

    Hip Hop has always been here. Its just a matter of recognizing how it manifests itself.

    Don't believe me?

    Let's see then.......

    Ceremonial dancer is today's break dancer

    The Ancient drummers are today's DJs

    The Priest who led all ceremonial and traditional events is the MC aka Master of Ceremonies

    In KMT, we had Hieroglyphs. Today, we have graffiti.

    Is this all by coincidence?

    One of the most important aspect of Hip Hop that is often overlooked, is its linguistics. The linguistics of Hip Hop is Ebonics. Though considered to be a single language, Ebonics is actually a family of languages(sound familiar?). This family includes, but is not limited to: Creole, Patwa, and African American/Black Vernacular English. The language itself, is actually a carry over from our Ancestral tongues.

    The reason why its difficult for us to pronounce certain words is because some of the syllables in those words, are non-existent in our Ancestral tongues.

    The connection to our ancestors is amazing isn't?
     
  2. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    real? real? where?

    we are in some of the most tumultuous of times. war, money crisis, election.....

    we i turn on BET all i see is kids living in la la land. no reality.
    has hip hop/rap had anything at all to say about the times we are going thorough?

    in other words what is the relevance?
     
  3. lite16

    lite16 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Greetings Bro. Jamesfrmphilly-

    I would feel like you to if my only interaction with Hip Hop is through BET. At one point I was beginning to think BET was the antithesis of Hip Hop/Black culture. Well, there are artists who speak about reality amongst other things of course. If you have some time maybe check out a show or two on Hard Knock Radio. You might feel a little differently about things.
    Here is a link to the radio station. http://kpfa.org/supportkpfa/
    peace
     
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