Brother AACOOLDRE : HE HYPOTHESIS OF LUKE RELATING TO TEFNUT’s Clouds: A Link with Homer’s Illiad?

Discussion in 'AACOOLDRE' started by AACOOLDRE, Mar 6, 2017.

  1. AACOOLDRE

    AACOOLDRE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    THE HYPOTHESIS OF LUKE RELATING TO TEFNUT’s Clouds: A Link with Homer’s Illiad?

    By Andre Austin

    The name of Luke is a Greek name of Loukas some say means “From Loukania or Lucania, Italy” the C and K are interchangeable. The name Lucania might be derived from Greek λευκός, leukos meaning "white", cognate of Latin lux ("light") see (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucania). I don’t know why this person overlooked Homer’s Leukos character
    Lucania - Wikipedia
    en.wikipedia.org


    However the people in Lucania were Oscan people using Latin and Greek from 500BC to 100AD.

    Homer wrote the Illiad and Odyssey in 800BC and the word Leukos is a companion of Odysseus, who is speared in the groin and apparently dies. Odysseus gets revenge by a mist of darkness clouding eyes of his opponent. The Greeks learned medicine from the ancient Egyptians and Tefnut (attributes of clouds, mist, spit, dew rain), clouded the eyes of Ra before he would eventually see. Could Leukomas, an eye disorder of seeing white spots, have come down through Greek mythology loosely based on Egyptian mythology. I will give you two translations. Well lets dip into the Illiad 4:489-500:

    “Now Antiphos, Priam’s son cast at him in the crowd with the sharp spear but missed Aias and struck Leukos, a brave companion of Odysseus, in the groin…For his killing Odysseus was stirred to a terrible anger…Odysseus struck him with the spear, in anger for his companion, in the temple, and the bronze spearhead drove through the other temple also, so that a mist of darkness clouded both eyes”.-Translation of Richard Lattimore. In W.H.D Rouse translation Leukos is spelled Leucos. Leukomas is a Greek word for the eye disorder of seeing white spots or clouds is not a coincidence.

    When Horus fought Satan his eyes were temporarily blinded but eventually healed and revenge was inflicted upon Satan by castration. Satan swallows then spits out the eye of the sun and it is healed. Strangely enough, the Lukewarm Church (Temple) in Laodicea (Rev 3:14-22) is swallowed spit out and declared neither hot or cold (a phrase that could mean balanced health and or good eyesight). The root word for spit was an attribute of Tefnut aka Maat and the heat of heaven.

    Notes: Herodotus 2:50 reports to us that nearly all the names of Greeks God’s were renamed after the Egyptian ones.
     
  2. AACOOLDRE

    AACOOLDRE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    To be fair to the Christians who think Lukewarm is about drinking water there is a word relating to Luke in Homer that relates to water in the Odyssey 5:333:

    Leucothea, a goddess of white waves

    She now took pity on the suffering

    Of wandering Odysseus. From the sea,

    She rose up like a gull upon the wing

    And sat down on his battered craft, saying;

    Poor man, why does such spite still drive Poseidon?

    Why does he hate you with such bitter passion,

    Inflicting trial on trial”- Translation by Allen Mandelbaum It’s interesting how pity is also taken upon the Lukewarm people in Rev 3: 14-22. The male equivalent of Luke in the Illiad relates to revenge of the eye and the female Luke in the Odyssey relates to water.
     
  3. AACOOLDRE

    AACOOLDRE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Homer's influence on the Bible is nothing new just check out Dennis R Macdonald'd book:

    "Does the New Testament Imitate Homer?: Four Cases from the Acts of the Apostles"
    In this provocative challenge to prevailing views of New Testament sources, Dennis MacDonald argues that the origins of passages in the book of Acts are to be found not in early Christian legends but in the epics of Homer. MacDonald focuses on four passages in the book of Acts, examines their potential parallels in the Iliad and concludes that the author of Acts composed them using famous scenes in Homer's work as a model. literature, MacDonald shows how the story generated a vibrant, mimetic literary tradition long before Luke composed the Acts. Luke could have expected educated readers to recognize his transformation of these tales and to see that the Christian God and heroes were superior to Homeric gods and heroes. Building upon and extending the analytic methods of his earlier book, The Homeric Epics and the Gospel of Mark, MacDonald opens an original and promising appreciation not only of Acts but also of the composition of early Christian narrative in general.
     
  4. AACOOLDRE

    AACOOLDRE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Does the New Testament imitate HOMER

    By Dennis R. Macdonald

    Christianizing Homer[edit]

    In one of MacDonald's first books, Christianizing Homer: The Odyssey, Plato, and the Acts of Andrew, he posited the theory that the non-canonical Acts of Andrew was a Christian retelling of Homer's Iliad.[2] In it he argued that one could detect trends that showed parallels between the Homeric epic and the Acts of Andrew. He argued that the Acts of Andrew is better understood in light of the Odyssey. That the order of events in the Acts follows those found in the Acts of Andrew, that certain events in the Acts are better understood when understood in context of the Homeric epics, and that the Homeric texts commonly were available during the first century AD. In subsequent works, MacDonald expanded his hypothesis to include the Acts of the Apostles and the Gospel of Mark as being Christian variations of the Homeric epics.

    In Christianizing Homer, MacDonald lays down his principles of literary mimesis, his methodology for comparing ancient texts. There are six aspects he examines 1) accessibility, 2) analogy, 3) density, 4) order, 5) distinctive traits, and 6) interpretability.[1] According to his hypothesis, not only was Homer readily available to the authors of the New Testament, but the Homeric epics would have been the basic texts upon which the New Testament authors learned to write Greek. MacDonald also argues that the number of common traits, the order in which they occur, and the distinctiveness thereof between the Homeric Texts and early Christian documents help to show that the New Testament writers were using Homeric models when writing various books.

    In his earliest reviews, MacDonald only applied his hypothesis to works such as Tobit and the Acts of Peter. In later works, he posits the Acts of the Apostles, the Gospel of Mark, and Gospel of Luke are the "merging [of] two great cultural classics, in order 'to depict Jesus as more compassionate, powerful, noble, and enured to suffering than Odysseus.” (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dennis_MacDonald).
    Dennis MacDonald - Wikipedia
    en.wikipedia.org



    I Like Dennis works and he’s supported by one of the top notch atheist Richard Carrier


    For me the Bible is a literary work using knowledge or themes from other texts.

    When I started doing research on the term Lukewarm I knew by its context it had something to do with eyesight. Christians felt it had something to do with drinking water. The writings of Homer’s Illiad 4:489-500 and the Odyssey 5:333 may give us both from the above.

    The male Luke (Leukos) is linked with eyesight and the female Luke (Leukothea) is linked with white water/and a Trial.

    The Oxford dictionary claims that Leuk is for Look and Leuke= League, Luke, Lion

    Luke in Greek is Loukas and can be a pun of Leukomas (eye disorder of seeing white spots white clouds). Wow we are getting hot because we have a character in Homer called Leukos that relates to a story of revenge being taken upon by placing clouds over the eyes (Illiad 4:489-500).

    The gnostic Christians who wrote an epistle to the Laodicea’s knew the true meaning of the Lukewarm church and told them to keep “Looking for the judgement”, a trial?. When we look at the female Luke (Leukothea) in Odyssey 5:333 she is white water and the attitude of pity is brought up.

    For me the NT Luke is a mythological blind man who is an eye-doctor and writes down what eye-witnesses saw.
     
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