Black People : Have we forgotten the First Nation to Battle White Supremacy?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Jul 12, 2010.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Published on Monday, July 12, 2010 by Al Jazeera English
    Little Improvement at Haiti's Epicentre
    by Rob Reynolds

    .....Bodies under debris

    We caught up with Leogane's burly mayor, Alec Santos, outside the tent where he has been living, next to his badly damaged two-story home. He said from his perspective, it looks like the earthquake might have happened yesterday.


    "My town is still under debris. For crying out loud, there are still some dead bodies under those buildings," said Santos, a former real estate developer who lived in Brooklyn for a decade and served in the US Army. He, too, cited the discrepancy between the aid money pledged or provided by the international community and paucity of progress on the ground:

    "I heard there was so many millions going to Haiti, but I haven't seen it. I've heard a lot of promises. Promises, promises, promises. I'm hoping in the next few months I'll see some results."

    If things haven't improved much for most people here, for some, they may be about to get worse.

    Evictions

    Inside a sweltering hut outside of town, we met Aurelien Joseph feeding porridge to Marie Jose, the youngest of his four children. The family has lived here, on privately owned land, since the earthquake, along with hundreds of others. Now, Joseph said, they have only a few days till they will be evicted.

    "We have been occupying this private land because my house was destroyed and I didn't have anywhere to go. Now the owner is asking us to leave the land. And I don't know where to go."

    Many of Leogane's churches were badly damaged by the quake, but that hasn't stopped people from worshiping. On a weekday afternoon recently, hundreds of people packed a new church set up in a large tent near the city's central square. They sang, clapped and twirled their rosaries as a lay deacon led a procession around the altar, holding high a representation of the crucified Christ.

    In the past six months, many visitors have admired the Haitian people's great resilience, perseverance, and unswerving religious faith. In the end those qualities may be worth much more than the millions of dollars in aid - money that so far has done little to help them rebuild their lives.

    http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2010/07/12
     
  2. asmith161718

    asmith161718 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Democracy Now on linktv has a one hour segment on Haiti today. The Former Secretary of State For Public Affairs Patrick Haley was interviewed. He said that only 10% of the promised Billion has flowed through to Haiti because the country's government was severly broken before the earthquake. You can see the segment on linktvdotorg
     
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Published on Tuesday, July 13, 2010 by CommonDreams.org
    Where Is Haiti's Bailout?
    by Isabel Macdonald

    After the January 12 earthquake in Haiti, Western leaders announced bold blueprints for building a "New Haiti." This reconstruction, they emphasized, would be "Haitian-led," based firmly on the principle of respect for "Haitian sovereignty" and carried out through "full and continued participation" by Haitians, "consistent with the vision of the Haitian people and government." At the March 31 International Donors Conference Towards a New Future for Haiti at the UN headquarters in NYC, nearly 10 billion dollars were pledged for Haiti's recovery. Nicholas Sarkozy -- the first French president to visit Haiti since the latter won its independence from French colonial rule -- proclaimed during his historic February 2010 trip to Port-au-Prince, "International aid must be massive and be there for the long term."

    "Now is the time to step up our investment in Haiti," Clinton reiterated in April at an Inter-American Development Bank meeting in Washington, D.C. Yet six months after the earthquake, the plan for a "New Future for Haiti" (a "Haitian-led" effort which is curiously being funded under World Bank oversight, through a commission whose 20 voting board members include only seven Haitians) seems remote indeed.

    http://www.commondreams.org/view/2010/07/13
     
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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