Haiti : Haitians in U.S. Revolution Get Monument

Clyde C Coger Jr

going above and beyond
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bientempo

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https://www.dallasnews.com/opinion/commentary/2018/01/12/america-going-need-immigrants-haiti

In the 1820s and again in the 1850s, thousands of free African Americans emigrated from New York, Boston, Philadelphia and other American cities to Haiti. Following a slave revolt against France in the 19th century, Haiti had become the second republic in the Western hemisphere and one of only three -- including the U.S. and France -- on earth. Haiti was also one of the wealthiest nations in the Western hemisphere, having retained a big share of the global sugar trade.

If you look at the timeline you will find that the 1820's to 1844 was during the time that Haiti invaded the Dominican republic. Boyer was trying to populate the Dominican Republic when he proposed area's within the Dominican Republic. We still have a few english speaking Dominicans that live in the Samana area of the Dominican Republic.
Most of the American blacks returned to the US, as they did not assimilate

http://www.inmotionaame.org/migrations/topic.cfm;jsessionid=f8301597051523271905023?migration=4&topic=5&bhcp=1
In 1824, the New York Colonization Society received a commitment from Haitian President Jean-Pierre Boyer to pay the passage of U.S. emigrants. Boyer also promised to support them for their first four months and to grant them land. The same year, African-American leaders, including wealthy Philadelphia businessman James Fortenand Bishop Richard Allen, formed the Haytian Emigration Society of Coloured People. They arranged for the transportation of several hundred people, not only to Haiti but also to Santo Domingo, the Spanish-speaking western part of the island of Hispaniola that had been conquered by Haiti in 1822.


Widespread migration to Haiti never materialized. Estimates of the number of African Americans who made the trip range from eight thousand to thirteen thousand, but most returned to the United States. Unlike the situation in Liberia, the island's fairly large but mostly transient African-American community left no lasting evidence of its presence.
 
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