Haiti : Haiti: Political Assassination? Suspicious Death of Judge Who Called for Prosecution of Presidential

Alarm Clock

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The highly suspicious death last weekend of an Investigating Judge (Juge d’instruction) who was probing alleged corruption in the presidential family has shocked Haiti and started a cycle of charges and counter-charges which will surely widen Haiti’s ever-growing political divide.
Judge Jean Serge Joseph was investigating a corruption case implicating President Michel Martelly’s wife and son, Sophia and Olivier Martelly. Both stand accused of siphoning off hundreds of thousands of dollars from bogus social and sports programs, which have made token gestures at reducing Haiti’s surging poverty while being hyped by expensive propaganda campaigns and counter-productive publicity stunts, critics charge.

http://www.globalresearch.ca/haiti-political-assassination-suspicious-death-of-judge-who-called-for-prosecution-of-presidential-family/5343313
 

bientempo

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Next , He is just following those who have went before footsteps. Maybe you should worry more about things like this

http://towardfreedom.com/americas/2015-slavery-in-haiti
In Haiti, the only nation ever to host a successful slave revolution, 225,000 to 300,000 children(1) live in forced and usually violent servitude in a system known as restavèk, literally "to stay with."

The system usually works this way: A parent who cannot afford to feed or educate a child may give him or her to a better-off relative, neighbor or stranger who promises to provide care and schooling. The families giving up children are usually from the countryside, where poverty is unrelenting. The children are as young as three, with girls between six and 14 years old comprising 65 percent of the population.
Restavèk children toil long hours and rarely go to school. They are regularly abused. They usually eat table scraps or have to scavenge in the streets for their own food, sleep on the floor and wear cast-off rags.

The system has long been widely socially accepted and its neutral-sounding name has rarely been replaced by the more appropriate term of slavery. But efforts are underway to change this.
 

Kadijah

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Next , He is just following those who have went before footsteps. Maybe you should worry more about things like this

http://towardfreedom.com/americas/2015-slavery-in-haiti
In Haiti, the only nation ever to host a successful slave revolution, 225,000 to 300,000 children(1) live in forced and usually violent servitude in a system known as restavèk, literally "to stay with."

The system usually works this way: A parent who cannot afford to feed or educate a child may give him or her to a better-off relative, neighbor or stranger who promises to provide care and schooling. The families giving up children are usually from the countryside, where poverty is unrelenting. The children are as young as three, with girls between six and 14 years old comprising 65 percent of the population.
Restavèk children toil long hours and rarely go to school. They are regularly abused. They usually eat table scraps or have to scavenge in the streets for their own food, sleep on the floor and wear cast-off rags.

The system has long been widely socially accepted and its neutral-sounding name has rarely been replaced by the more appropriate term of slavery. But efforts are underway to change this.
"A parent who cannot afford to feed or educate a child may give him or her to a better-off relative, neighbor or stranger who promises to provide care and schooling. "

Black people in the U.S. have done this forever. It's an informal type of adoption. Give the kid to live with grandparents, or uncles, aunts, cousins, etc.

Slavery? I don't think so. Not when the child who was given to an abusive person can leave. That's the hallmark of slavery - the inability to leave. The author of the piece, and although my heart goes out to her, said she lived with 4 different families. She wasn't SOLD to those families; she ran away and was taken in by each one.
 

bientempo

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Oct 11, 2009
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"A parent who cannot afford to feed or educate a child may give him or her to a better-off relative, neighbor or stranger who promises to provide care and schooling. "

Black people in the U.S. have done this forever. It's an informal type of adoption. Give the kid to live with grandparents, or uncles, aunts, cousins, etc.

Slavery? I don't think so. Not when the child who was given to an abusive person can leave. That's the hallmark of slavery - the inability to leave. The author of the piece, and although my heart goes out to her, said she lived with 4 different families. She wasn't SOLD to those families; she ran away and was taken in by each one.


This is the part you missed "Restavèk children toil long hours and rarely go to school. They are regularly abused. They usually eat table scraps or have to scavenge in the streets for their own food, sleep on the floor and wear cast-off rags. "

.
yes they can leave, but their situation is not improved. I doubt is the situation that you describe in the US is the same.
 

Kadijah

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This is the part you missed "Restavèk children toil long hours and rarely go to school. They are regularly abused. They usually eat table scraps or have to scavenge in the streets for their own food, sleep on the floor and wear cast-off rags. "

.
yes they can leave, but their situation is not improved. I doubt is the situation that you describe in the US is the same.
No. I did NOT miss it. Many biological children are regularly abused, etc. That doesn't make them "slaves." Like the children in Haiti the article speaks of, it makes them "abused and/or neglected" children.
 

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