Black Education / Schools : Group encourages blacks to become, and remain, engineers

Discussion in 'Black Education / Schools' started by dustyelbow, Mar 20, 2006.

  1. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    1,210
    Likes Received:
    21
    Ratings:
    +21
    Group encourages blacks to become, and remain, engineers
    Engineering a strategy for growth


    Tuesday, March 14, 2006
    By Corilyn Shropshire, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

    John Beale, Post-Gazette
    Carl Mack, executive director of the National Society of Black Engineers, speaks to reporters yesterday about his group's upcoming convention March 29 to April 2 at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center.
    Click photo for larger image.

    If the large percentages of black children dropping out of high school continues, the number of African-American engineers in the United States -- already small -- could shrink to nothing, a trade group warned yesterday.

    "We're no different than dinosaurs looking at a meteor heading right toward us -- because we're headed to our own extinction," warned Carl Mack, executive director of the Alexandria, Va.-based National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE).

    Mr. Mack, speaking to reporters at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center to promote the group's annual conference to be held here late this month, blamed the low numbers of black students pursuing engineering degrees or dropping out altogether on teachers who, untrained in teaching math and science, don't make it enjoyable subject matter. He also cited the absence of strong mentors and visible examples of successful black engineers.

    Blacks received 3,276, or about 5.2 percent, of the engineering degrees earned in the United States in 2002, the most recent year for which numbers are available, and compose about 6.2 percent of the science, technology and engineering work force, said Eric Addison, managing editor of NSBE magazine.

    Moreover, blacks only make up about 36,000, or 2.6 percent, of the 1.4 million working engineers in the United States -- even though blacks represent roughly 12 percent of the overall population. "We haven't seen any evidence of a major gain in the numbers of black engineers," Mr. Addison said.

    That, coupled with the recent reports, such as one published this month for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation that said half of black students do not finish high school, is a death knell for the future of black engineers in the United States, Mr. Mack said. "It's impossible to think that NSBE will exist with the devastation we see in K-12," Mr. Mack said.

    His organization, which has 17,000 members, the majority of them engineering students, is working to steer more young adults into the professional field and to help those already there. Black engineers must step in where educators and parents, ill-equipped to help children with math and science course work, have fallen short, Mr. Mack said.

    The group spent $250,000 last year to launch an online tutoring program for students in kindergarten through high school who need math and science homework assistance. The program, he said, was open to elementary and secondary school students who pay NSBE's $5 membership fee.


    NSBE also is developing a summer program that will focus on immersing third- through fifth-graders in math and science, he said. "There's a lot of problems that we see, and we think that the NSBE can be a solution to that," Mr. Mack said.

    NSBE's annual conference will be held March 29 through April 2 at the convention center. About 12,000 students and technical professional are expected to attend, which Mr. Mack estimated could generate tens of millions in conference and tourism revenue for Pittsburgh.


    Dont trust this Bill Gates advice with your children about hopelessness of black school children.

    Black engineer based on NSBE is suggested to be more equipped with not only enginneering skills but a strong social skill than lets say your easy going hippie ruthless white engineering degreed man counterpart.

    Has NSBE become a special interest themselves? The majority of NSBE membership are students not professionals, Very strange indeed.
     
  2. jgyknowledge

    jgyknowledge Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2004
    Messages:
    312
    Likes Received:
    1
    Ratings:
    +1
    Where do you get your info on NSBE from?

    I was a NSBE member during college and even served on the board at the school that I attended. I have to applaud NSBE for reaching out to the community, this included grade school students as well as high school students. They also have international chapters in Africa as well. I also, attended many job fairs. NSBE gave me a chance to showcase and develop my leadership skills. They also have an alumni chapter, full of professionals that continue to support the organization.

    NSBE is not only for engineering majors, but for all technical majors to join. I'll defend NSBE, by saying that the experiences I received have forever changed my life. Imagine being a college student at a predominately white school, and the encouragement that was received from being around like-minded individuals. I remember when I attended the NSBE national conference. It was soo beautiful that I just stood in the crowd lost, almost in tears. We were at a convention center, I think Charlotte, but I had just gotten off some escalators and I looked back. All I could see were black faces. Surrounding me, on the escalators, and all through the convention center. I can't even describe the bond I felt towards my other sisters and brothers at that very moment. That moment was priceless and will forever be etched in my memory.

    I say these things, because at that point in my life I had stopped believing in Black unity. I thought it wasn't possible. They renewed something in my soul that had been missing.
     
  3. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    1,210
    Likes Received:
    21
    Ratings:
    +21
    Here http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06073/669819.stm


    I have no doubts at what you are saying. But the NSBE is crying for help. They have a strong presence in HBUC.

    But I have to say that the pioneering days of NSBE are over. They cannot use the same introduction membership techniques with black students and professionals dropping lower and lower in the engineering field due to a variety of factors but mainly with trends in the country USA with using immigrant engineers and doing most firm engineering work of all kinds overseas. With a racial caste system in place still this puts the black engineer and student in low priority. Even white "hippie" engineers are breaking a sweat these days in competing with China and India on the horizon.

    They should have lobbied Washington or made some attempt in the early 90's but they were so involved with Democratic Clinton politics when things were "GOOD" that now things have progressively gotten worse and worse. Getting Clinton and his administration to implements some safeguards would have helped even a tiny bit but now that oppurtunity is gone with Bush in office and now the responsibility of what Carl Mack refers to falls on the shoulders of an already tired overexerted marginalized hard-to-find "Black" engineers. Right now they are trying to make ends meet. I dont blame them. But Carl Mack might when its said and done.

    The numbers are too low using the same techniques in place to make any enormous difference. Maybe channeling whatever resources left over to entering freshmen black high school students would make a better difference in my opinion than college students who may dropout anyway with only 54% of Americans not finishing college with blacks and hispanics below that average.
     
  4. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    1,210
    Likes Received:
    21
    Ratings:
    +21
    Slicing and dicing left overs. Its kind of ironic since Pittsburgh is not condisered the best of surroundings for saying "we're headed to our own extinction". Check Now defunct steel industry and Pittburgh recognized black history



    Black engineers ready for convention here

    Tuesday, March 28, 2006
    By Ervin Dyer, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

    The National Society of Black Engineers rolls its much-expanded presence into town tomorrow, bringing with it a wide-ranging examination of black Americans and their role in an ever-expanding technological world.




    Previous Story

    Group encourages blacks to become, and remain, engineers





    Dozens of nationally known speakers and more than 10,000 people are expected for five days of community events, workshops and awards sessions all tied to the conference's theme: Building the FIRE, or the Foundation to Impact, Revitalize and Empower.

    Allegheny County Chief Executive Dan Onorato, Mayor Bob O'Connor and schools Superintendent Mark Roosevelt are expected to join group officials and others to kick off the conference tomorrow.

    The society, spread over six geographic regions, has 300 chapters and has been in existence since 1975. But as a group it has catered mostly to college students and stayed mostly under the radar. A conference in Pittsburgh in the mid-1990s was a significantly smaller affair that went largely unnoticed.

    Today, Carl B. Mack, a former president of the Seattle NAACP and a mechanical engineer, is determined to bring what he called "America's best-kept secret" out of the dark.

    Mr. Mack is not shy about addressing what he calls a dearth of black professionals in the engineering fields and is poised to involve the organization in changing that.

    Nationally, blacks make up about 36,000, or 2.6 percent, of the 1.4 million working engineers in the United States -- even though blacks represent roughly 12 percent of the overall population.

    Increasing those figures, said Mr. Mack, is tantamount to self-preservation. If the numbers don't get higher, he said, the NSBE would struggle to exist.

    To address the level of minorities in engineering, Mr. Mack is positioning the NSBE to be mission-oriented by telling its members to volunteer in schools and be a resource that is lacking in the home.

    "If there is a crisis in the country," he said, "it needs a solution and NSBE can be the solution."

    To turn the tide, the society has launched a $25,000 online tutoring program for kindergarten through high school students and is developing a summer program to immerse third- and fifth-graders in math and science.

    Before the conference wraps up on Sunday, delegates will debate the role of women in technology, host a math competition, launch rockets from Point State Park and examine roles for black engineers in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and the rebuilding of New Orleans.

    A few high-profile names in business and engineering will weigh in during the conference, including: Randal Pinkett, the first African American to win on Donald Trump's TV show "Apprentice"; Dr. Gwendolyn Boyd of Johns Hopkins University, the first black woman to earn a master's degree in mechanical engineering from Yale University; Jared Cohon, president of Carnegie Mellon University; and National Public Radio journalist Ed Gordon, who will host the black-tie Golden Torch Awards on Thursday night.

    A large part of the conference is the national jobs exhibition, the graduate student fair, designed to interest students in advanced technical degrees, and free community activities that reach out to high school students of color to interest them in engineering careers.

    The National Society of Black Engineers, based in Alexandria, Va., is expecting that 10,000 attendees will be family and pre-college students, 7,000 will be undergraduate or graduate students, 1,000 will be technical professionals from across the country and 300 corporate members.

    Conference-goers are expected to fill the city's 3,500 Downtown hotel rooms and will spill out into 7,000 rooms in other nearby lodgings. The four-day conference, the largest convention this year, is expected to drop $37 million into the city's coffers. The conference runs through Sunday at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. Most activities start at 9 a.m.

    NSBE is one of the largest student-managed organizations in the world. Students do all the planning, budgeting and administration for the conference.

    For entertainment, there are comedy and gospel shows.

    A free Pre-College Community Day is scheduled for Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. Students must be accompanied by an adult to attend workshops on mentoring, health and engineering. There will be a math-athon competition and a model rocket launch. Lunch is free for the first 200 and dress is casual.

    Paid registration, from $75 to $400, is required for most events.

    For more information, or to register, visit www.nsbe.org and click on the Pittsburgh '06 link.

    The conference is supported by local corporations, including Alcoa, PPG Industries, U.S. Steel, and by the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University.
     
  5. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    1,210
    Likes Received:
    21
    Ratings:
    +21
    Women need to represent and hippie "white" engineer isnt to hip or use to to men and women in "black" skin.

    Young black engineers champion career paths

    Thursday, March 30, 2006
    By Ervin Dyer, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

    In many ways, it was a student's dream.


    http://www.post-gazette.com/images4/20060330rrlocalengineers2_450.jpg
    Robin Rombach, Post-Gazette
    Arielle Drummond, right, who is pursuing a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, talks with Genetta Vinson, the national convention planning chairperson, at the National Society of Black Engineers convention at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center.


    A chance to tell scores of adults, including Allegheny County Chief Executive Dan Onorato, Mayor Bob O'Connor and Pittsburgh Public Schools Superintendent Mark Roosevelt, just where to go -- as in, "Go here for the press conference. Turn left to register. Go up the escalator to find the cyber cafe.''

    That's just what members of the National Society of Black Engineers got to do yesterday as one of the largest student-run organizations in the world -- 17,800 members -- opened the doors on its 32nd annual conference at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center. It was students, strutting in their business blues and carting card-thin cell phones, who were running this show.

    They organized the workshops. They planned the awards sessions. They coordinated the lectures. And in their baggy jeans and stuffed brief cases, they cluttered in the hallways, posed for photos with the Allegheny River glowing in the background, and stepped off buses in droves. Some 10,000 are expected to attend, selling out Downtown's hotels and taking up rooms at places miles away.

    It was spring break with a mission: to educate and make a difference, an army of techno-wizards aiming high, providing hope for the future and pride for their race.

    Taking a break from organizing the graduate student fair, Arielle Drummond, 25, sat down on the convention center's second-level and talked about how she got here.

    http://www.post-gazette.com/images4/20060330rrlocalengineer1_450.jpg
    Robin Rombach, Post-Gazette
    Donald Walker, a student at MIT, works on setting up computers for self-registration at the National Society of Black Engineers conference at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center.
    Click photo for larger image.


    A study in poise, Ms. Drummond was influenced to study physics and biology by a young teacher in the private school she attended in New Jersey. After graduating from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, she came to Carnegie Mellon University, where she is pursuing a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering.

    The road has not been easy. In a field dominated by white males, she's survived through the encouragement of a strong mentor, a teacher-friend she found online.

    "We need more women," she said. "You get discouraged around men all day and there's no one who looks like you do."

    Marcus Scott, 23, transportation director for the conference, hands a reporter his business card.

    A senior at the University of Pittsburgh, he was sold on the society when as a freshman he begged his parents for $80 to attend an NSBE convention in North Carolina. Impressed with the sense of camaraderie, and young people in leadership, he came back to Pitt and changed his major from computer science to computer engineering.

    "This is more than an organization," said Mr. Scott, "This is family."

    A family that is growing. About a year ago, CMU and Pitt revived their NSBE chapters and now they co-sponsor pre-college clubs at Peabody and Westinghouse high schools. The pre-college groups began in January, and once a week, they tutor about 30 students in math and science, hoping to light their fire for engineering careers.

    The biggest gift is they just show up, giving the high school students real-life models and showing them a palette of professional options from biomedicine to environmental and civil engineering.

    "The biggest barrier," said Ms. Drummond, "is that inner-city students often have no exposure to engineers and many times don't even understand what one does.

    "I tell them, you don't have to be a nerd, but you have to make decent grades and you can go to college."

    The students will be at the convention center, and in the spotlight, through Sunday. The stars of their own show.
     
  6. KWABENA

    KWABENA STAFF STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2004
    Messages:
    4,647
    Likes Received:
    363
    Occupation:
    Leader-Student-Teacher
    Location:
    Everywhere
    Ratings:
    +367
    Funny...I am working in the field of Engineering.

    CD
     
Loading...