Black Spirituality Religion : Greek/Khemetian Philosophy

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by Nisa, May 6, 2005.

  1. Nisa

    Nisa Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,512
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    MICHIGAN
    Ratings:
    +31
    I was reading Stolen Legacy....and I came across this...
    The term Greek philosophy to begin with is a misnomer,for there is no such philosophy..The Greeks made the best of their chance to lean all they could about Khemetian culture,some students received instructions directly from the Khemetian culture;most students received instructions from Khemetian Preists,but after the invasions by Alexander the Great,the Royal temples and libraries were plundered and pillaged,and Aristotles school converted the library at Alexandria into a research cente. There is no wonder then, that the production of the unusually large number of books ascribed to Aristotle has proved a physical impossibility,for any single man within a life time..

    :jawdrop:
     
  2. Nisa

    Nisa Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,512
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    MICHIGAN
    Ratings:
    +31
  3. Nisa

    Nisa Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,512
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    MICHIGAN
    Ratings:
    +31
    Greeks 'borrowed Egyptian numbers'

    By Paul Rincon
    BBC Science



    The astronomers, physicists and mathematicians of ancient Greece were true innovators.

    Ancient Greeks used letters and extra symbols to represent digits
    But one thing it seems the ancient Greeks did not invent was the counting system on which many of their greatest thinkers based their pioneering calculations.

    New research suggests the Greeks borrowed their system known as alphabetic numerals from the Egyptians, and did not develop it themselves as was long believed.

    Greek alphabetic numerals were favoured by the mathematician and physicist Archimedes, the scientific philosopher Aristotle and the mathematician Euclid, amongst others.

    "Egyptians used hieratic and, later, demotic script where the multiple symbols looked more like single symbols," said Professor Joyce.

    "Instead of seven vertical strokes, a particular squiggle was used. That's the same scheme used in the Greek alphabetic numerals."

    Traditionally, the system is thought to have been developed by Greeks in western Asia Minor, in modern day Turkey.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3109806.stm
     
  4. Nisa

    Nisa Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,512
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    MICHIGAN
    Ratings:
    +31
    Dr. Kwame Nantambu of Kent State University, USA had read the works of Lefkowitz (Not Out of Africa: How Afrocentrism Became an Excuse to Teach Myth as History), Dr. Theophile Obenga (A Lost Tradition: African Philosophy in World History), Aristotle (Metaphysics)and other ancient thinkers, and gathered some information on Kemetian Philosophy that appear to have inspired many not only from within, but also outside its borders.
    According to Nantambu, Eyptian education embodied the strive to "become like God", "one with God", or "to become godlike through the revision of one's own 'Neter' of how god is revealed in the person.". For a commoner, the highest status of achievement was reflected in the ability of a son to become one of the "guardians of the state", which is what the Priests represented. Priesthood signified a "caste of brilliant thinkers". In this respect, these folks had the priviledge of high education, learning Grammar, Arithmetric, Geometry, Astronomy, Engineering, Sculpture, Metallurgy, Agriculture, Mining, Forestry, Music, Art, Carpentry, Magic, Masonry, Rhetoric and Dialectic. A student was referred to as a "Neophyte", and he was disciplined in the follow manner:




    Control his thoughts

    Control his actions

    Have devotion of purpose

    Have faith in the ability of his master to teach him the truth

    Have faith in himself to assimilate the truth

    Have faith in himself to wield the truth

    Be free from resentment under the experience of persecution

    Be free from resentment under experience of wrong

    Cultivate the ability to distinguish between the real and the unreal ( he must have a sense of values)

    Cultivate the ability to distinguish between right and wrong

    These seem to parallel the Plato's three "cardinal virtues". For instance, "Control of thoughts and action" parallels Plato's "virtue of wisdom", "freedom from resentment under persecution" parallels Plato's "virtue of fortitude", "the ability to distinguish between right and wrong, and between the real and unreal" parallels Plato's "virtues of justice and temperance."

    As Nantambu put it, the "Hippocrtic Oath" portrays Hypocrates as "father of medicine", when history tells us that Imhotep was worshiped by the Greeks as the "God of Medicine" 2,000 years before the birth of Hypocrates.

    Indeed this Greek worship of Imhotep is mentioned elsewhere
    " Imhotep:

    Of the non royal population of Egypt, probably one man is known better then all others. So successful was Imhotep (Imhetep, Greek Imouthes) that he is one of the world's most famous ancients, and his name, if not his true identity, has been made even more famous by various mummy movies. Today, the world is probably much more familiar with his name then that of his principal king, Djoser. Imhotep, who's name means "the one that comes in peace". existed as a mythological figure in the minds of most scholars until the end of the nineteenth century when he was established as a real historical person.
    He was the world's first named architect who built Egypt's first pyramid, is often recognized as the world's first doctor, a priest,. scribe, sage, poet, astrologer, and a vizier and chief minister, though this role is unclear, to Djoser (reigned 2630–2611 BC), the second king of Egypt's third dynasty. He may have lived under as many as four kings. An inscription on one of that kings statues gives us Imhotep's titles as the "chancellor of the king of lower Egypt", the "first one under the king", the "administrator of the great mansion", the "hereditary Noble", the "high priest of Heliopolis", the "chief sculptor", and finally the "chief carpenter"…

    Imhotep may have been born in Ankhtowë, a suburb of Memphis early in Egyptian history. However, other classical writers suggested that he was from the village of Gebelein, south of ancient Thebes. His father might have been an architect named Kanofer. His mother could have been Khreduonkh, who probably belonged to the province of Mendes, and he may have had a wife named Ronfrenofert but none of this is by any means certain. As a commoner at birth, he rose through the ranks quickly due to his genius, natural talents and dedication…

    He was later even worshipped by the early Christians as one with Christ. The early Christians, it will be recalled, adapted to their use those pagan forms and persons whose influence through the ages had woven itself so powerfully into tradition that they could not omit them.

    He was worshiped even in Greece where he was identified with their god of medicine, Aslepius. . He was honored by the Romans and the emperors Claudius and Tiberius had inscriptions praising Imhotep placed on the walls of their Egyptian temples. He even managed to find a place in Arab traditions, especially at Saqqara where his tomb is thought to be located.

    Imhotep lived to a great age, apparently dying in the reign of King Huni, the last of the dynasty. His burial place has not been found but it has been speculated that it may indeed be at Saqqara, possibly in an unattested mastaba 3518." - Courtesy of touregypt.net

    Phrases like "man know thyself" were known to the Greeks (in Greek, qnothiseauton) from Socrates, however these words appear on the outside of Kemetian temples for the benefit of the neophytes.

    This too has been referenced elsewhere:

    "Below are some of the powerful teachings proverbs found in the temples of Luxor.

    - The best and shortest road towards knowledge of truth is Nature.

    - For every joy there is a price to be paid.

    - If his heart rules him, his conscience will soon take the place of the rod.

    - What you are doing does not matter so much as what you are learning from doing it. · It is better not to know and to know that one does not know, than presumptuously to attribute some random meaning to symbols.

    - If you search for the laws of harmony, you will find knowledge.

    - If you are searching for a Neter, observe Nature!
    Exuberance is a good stimulus towards action, but the inner light grows in silence and concentration.

    - Not the greatest Master can go even one step for his disciple; in himself he must experience each stage of developing consciousness. Therefore he will know nothing for which he is not ripe.

    - The body is the house of God. That is why it is said, "Man know thyself."

    - True teaching is not an accumulation of knowledge; it is an awaking of consciousness which goes through successive stages.

    - The man who knows how to lead one of his brothers towards what he has known may one day be saved by that very brother…"
     
  5. Nisa

    Nisa Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,512
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    MICHIGAN
    Ratings:
    +31
    Source: http://www.aldokkan.com/art/proverbs.htm

    The aforementioned phrase itself doesn't appear only once in these texts of Nile Valley temples.

    Another saying, "eat, drink and be merry, for tomorrow we shall die" which Socrates used, was actually coined by Imhotep, "the world's first recorded multi-genuis".
     
  6. Nisa

    Nisa Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,512
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    MICHIGAN
    Ratings:
    +31
    The Keys of Ra is an exercise in applied philosophy using Ancient Egyptian concepts of Truth and the power of Naturu (God) mixed with modern day thought processes to create a system for self perfection (healing) that radiates out into the world. Based on the world view represented in the sacred hieroglyphs of the Ancient Egyptians, this course is accompanied by a class manual for personal use to do self-study and to continue learning outside of class. The basic premise behind the course is to give the student an opportunity to open communication with his or her own higher self (or selves as the Egyptians believed). In so doing, the student learns how to receive and amplify energy from God, how to direct energy with proper intention, and how to instruct others.

    http://www.keysofra.com/
     
  7. Nisa

    Nisa Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,512
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    MICHIGAN
    Ratings:
    +31
  8. Nisa

    Nisa Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,512
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    MICHIGAN
    Ratings:
    +31
    Did ancient Greek religion and culture derive from Egypt?

    The idea that Greek religion and philosophy has Egyptian origins derives, at least in part, from the writings of ancient Greek historians. In the fifth century BC Herodotus was told by Egyptian priests that the Greeks owed many aspects of their culture to the older and vastly impressive civilization of the Egyptians. Egyptian priests told Diodorus some of the same stories four centuries later. The church fathers in the second and third centuries AD also were eager to emphasize the dependency of Greece on the earlier cultures of the Egyptians and the Hebrews. They were eager to establish direct links between their civilization and that of Egypt because Egypt was a vastly older culture, with elaborate religious customs and impressive monuments. But despite their enthusiasm for Egypt and its material culture (an enthusiasm that was later revived in eighteenth and nineteenth-century Europe), they failed to understand Egyptian religion and the purpose of many Egyptian customs.

    Classical scholars tend to be skeptical about the claims of the Greek historians because much of what these writers say does not conform to the facts as they are now known from the modern scholarship on ancient Egypt. For centuries Europeans had believed that the ancient historians knew that certain Greek religious customs and philosophical interests derived from Egypt. But two major discoveries changed that view. The first concerned a group of ancient philosophical treatises attributed to Hermes Trismegistus; these had throughout the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance been thought of as Egyptian and early. But in 1614 the French scholar Isaac Casaubon demonstrated that the treatises were actually late and basically Greek. The second discovery was the decipherment of hieroglyphics, the official system of Egyptian writing, completed by 1836. Before decipherment, scholars had been compelled to rely on Greek sources for their understanding of Egyptian history and civilization. Once they were able to read real Egyptian texts, and could disregard the fanciful interpretations of hieroglyphics that had been circulating since late antiquity, it became clear to them that the relation of Egyptian to Greek culture was less close than they had imagined. Egyptian belonged to the Afroasiatic language family, while Greek was an Indo-European language, akin to Sanskrit and European languages like Latin.

    On the basis of these new discoveries, European scholars realized that they could no longer take at face value what Herodotus, Diodorus, and the Church fathers had to say about Greece's debt to Egypt. Once it was possible to read Egyptian religious documents, and to see how the Egyptians themselves described their gods and told their myths, scholars could see that the ancient Greeks' accounts of Egyptian religion were superficial, and even misleading. Apparently Greek writers, despite their great admiration for Egypt, looked at Egyptian civilization through cultural blinkers that kept them from understanding any practices or customs that were significantly different from their own. The result was a portrait of Egypt that was both astigmatic and deeply Hellenized. Greek writers operated under other handicaps as well. They did not have access to records; there was no defined system of chronology. They could not read Egyptian inscriptions or question a variety of witnesses because they did not know the language. Hence they were compelled to exaggerate the importance of such resemblances as they could see or find.
    http://www.wellesley.edu/CS/Mary/Not_Out_of_Africa.html
     
  9. Nisa

    Nisa Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,512
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    MICHIGAN
    Ratings:
    +31
  10. Nisa

    Nisa Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,512
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    MICHIGAN
    Ratings:
    +31
Loading...

Users found this page by searching for:

  1. Khemetian philosophy