Beauty - Hair Care - Fashion : "Good Hair" - Chris Rock

Discussion in 'Beauty - Black Hair Care - Fashion' started by cherryblossom, Nov 10, 2009.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/zorianna-kit/chris-rocks-good-hair-doc_b_316952.html

    Zorianna Kitwww.zoriannakit.tv
    Posted: October 11, 2009 09:45 PM

    Chris Rock's Good Hair Documentary: Something to Talk About

    Hair. No matter what ours is, we wish is was straighter, darker, lighter, thicker, thinner, more curly. Whatever it isn't, is what we want it to be. It's a life-long battle, struggle, love-and-hate relationship.

    And yet, it's only hair.

    And yet, it's everything.

    That is why comedian Chris Rocks' documentary Good Hair -- about black women's issues with their hair -- is sure to spark discussion and debate, no matter what color or race the viewer may be.

    Rock takes us on a fascinating journey through hair weaves, relaxers and the amount of money black women spend on hair. Eye-opening facts emerge, including that there are practically no African-American owned hair product companies: they're mostly Asian. We're also treated to a scientific experiment showing that hair relaxers have enough chemicals to completely dissolve a Coke can.

    When Rock learns that much of the hair used for creating extensions for black women comes from India, he travels there and discovers it is actually one of India's largest exports. He visits a Hindu temple where more than 10 million people -- most of them poor -- sacrifice their hair to God in a religious ceremony. Ironically, once cut, religion goes out the window and a multi-million dollar industry rears it's head: the sacrificed hair is processed and sold to hair dealers around the world who, in turn, sell it to local dealers who, in turn, sell it to salons and hair vendors.

    The documentary is interspersed with interviews with such celebrities as Nia Long, Ice-T, Raven Simone, Dr. Maya Angelou, Salt 'n Pepa, Eve, Tracy Thomas, and Reverend Al Sharpton. All of them offer up personal stories and observations about black women and hair. ("Relaxed" hair makes white people feel relaxed, they joke.)

    Rock also visits high schools, salons, barbershops and hair dealers in places like New York, Atlanta, Birmingham and Dallas to interview local black teens, women, children and men about black women's hair.

    Bottom line -- hair is big business and women are willing to spend hundreds and thousands on it to look good, even if in this flailing economy.

    The film's weakest part is a through-line featuring a hair battle at the Bronner Bros. Hair Show. Watching stylists cut and shape hair on a stage with loud music and flashy costumes may be a spectacle, but ultimately uninteresting and not insightful compared to the rest of the movie.

    Additionally, Rock's strength is not that of an interviewer and his voice-overs can get a little annoying. He's best taking the viewer into that world and then standing back to let us observe. Still, his name is clearly the drawing power to get viewers to board this fascinating ride because without him, the journey may not have even started.

    And with this journey, the conversations about hair begin. At a recent press day, many journalists -- black, white, men and women had plenty to discuss with Rock.

    Several journalists in the group wanted to know why Rock didn't explore the flip side of relaxers and showcase more black women who choose the keep their hair natural.

    "That would be like doing a story on 'Hey, there's no toxins in the water,'" said Rock. "Or 'Let's do a story on people who didn't get murdered yesterday.'"

    When one black, male journalist wanted to know why Rock didn't travel to Africa and show the origins of black women and their "natural" hair," Rock shot back: "That's Soledad O'Brien's job."

    Good Hair is not hard-hitting like a 20/20 or 60 Minutes-type of piece. With Rock's name on it, you're bound to have comedy. Yet the film is at its best when it touches on those more serious issues which are then hilariously deflected by Rock.

    "I want (viewers) to remember that they laughed," said Rock. "I'm a comedian. I make comedies. If they learn something (from this film), that's great, but I'm here to make people laugh."

    Still, after Rock left the interview room, the young black man remained frustrated at the film's message he felt Rock was putting out -- "that black women don't have good hair." He and a black female reporter with natural hair in braids discussed how Rock should have done a fictional comedy film about this issue instead, or a stand-up comedy concert film dealing with hair -- just not a documentary.

    Rock's co-star came to his defense.

    "This movie is not about the 'natural' part about hair," said Raven Symone (College Road Trip, Cheetah Girls). "It's the fact that we put in fake hair to make it look natural."

    Symone also felt that Rock didn't "have to put everything on the table" and whatever viewers feel was not addressed "should be talked about at home."

    And talking about this issue is no doubt what Rock intended.
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Chris Rock being Sued...

    Bad day: Chris Rock is sued over ‘Good Hair’
    Filmmaker claims comedian saw her film, ‘My Nappy Roots,’ and copied it

    updated 7:17 p.m. CT, Tues., Oct . 6, 2009
    LOS ANGELES - Chris Rock’s new film, “Good Hair,” is having a bad day.

    The funnyman is being sued over his new movie, a documentary which looks into the lengths members of the black community go to in order to change their hair, by a filmmaker who claims a film she made — and allegedly screened for the actor — is similar enough to Rock’s movie to be considered copyright infringement to the tune of at least $5 million.

    According to the lawsuit filed by Regina Kimbell in United States District Court, Central District of California, Kimbell claims Rock’s new film is very similar to her own film, “My Nappy Roots: A Journey Through Black Hair-itage.”

    COMPLETE ARTICLE: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33200833/ns/entertainment-access_hollywood/
     
  3. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I hope to have time to see this film. I feel that no matter who puts out this kind of film, whether it's Chris or the person that is suing him (in your following link), this subject should always be on the table. I think we need to come face-to-face with the kind of programmers that have deceived us about our hair and a continual communication is a way to solve this problem.

    It's unfortunate that a TV personality gets more attention for addressing a serious deception about 'Black Hair' more so than the person that is distraught over the possibility that her film was copied. But, if her intentions are good then she will soon be rewarded for her efforts anyway.
     
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    ^^^Yes, Sister Chevron, I, too, hope this lawsuit has a just outcome.


    And I hear ya too on the glaring difference in media attention between the two!
     
  5. Bootzey

    Bootzey Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I saw it this past weekend. It wasn't bad. It was funny. Just what I expected. Sit any cross section of Black women down in a room and you will find that each of us has a hair story to tell. In that we are the same. So for him being sued, I just don't see how the sister is gonna be able to distinguish her story from Chris'.


    Peace
     
  6. tay_tay225

    tay_tay225 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I saw this with my mother and step father at the theater. All I really gathered was "weave=good."

    I disagree. There are lots of cool things we can do with our hair. Pam Grier made me a fan of afros (did she rock that stuff or what?) and I love getting my hair put in cornrows during the summer.

    It is difficult to manage, though. My mom told me that she tried to deal with an afro back in the '70s and it was too difficult to comb, so she straightened it.

    I think straightening hair and using weave became the "in thing" because so many people were doing it since weave/straightening seems so much easier.
     
  7. warriorprincess

    warriorprincess Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I saw the film when it came out.

    I tried not to expect too much from it, but I was still thrown off my the emphasis on weave. I thought it was gonna atleast touch down on hair texture....

    Oh well, it got a lot of tongues wagging so thats a good thing.

    He also spoke about weaves from an economical standpoint....getting them from outside of our community...The thing is....where else would we get the weaves from? I dont think black women who have long hair would be willing to sell it.

    Ahhh nevermind, I forgot not all documentaries are solution oriented.
     
  8. Black Squared

    Black Squared Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I refuse to see it because I've seen several clips from it, all of which show woman making excuses for wearing weaves/wigs. After all the excuses are gone even my own mother admitted the reason black women wear fake hair is a self esteem issue. Our natural hair is beautiful as it is and we need to go back to embracing that and NOT STOP DOING SO.
     
  9. medusanegrita

    medusanegrita Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Just seen it!

    Actually, I'm watching it as I type.

    At first, I didn't want to see it either because I thought the only people he was gonna talk too were weaved women and relaxed women, and you know they were gonna espouse weaves and relaxers.

    Yeah, it was that.


    But a little more. The most GASPING thing I learned about this was how harsh the relaxer chemical sodium thyglyceride is. They put a drop on a chicken skin, and it ate it way through the chicken skin! Seriously, I didn't know it was that potent! Then they showed a soda can in the chemical and after 3 hours, it dissolved the entire soda can. I watched this with my 12 year old, whose never had a relaxer or weave, and she was like HELL NALL (she didn't actually say that, but those were her sentiments) 'I am never getting that! I don't want my skin burned off!'

    And working class black women paying $1000 for weaves and upward? Wow. I didn't even know they could be that much for people who were not stars.

    I gonna finish watching it, and read the rest of the thread afterwards. If I have anything more to add, I will. Thanks for the thread.

    Oh yes... about 50 minutes into it, and he STILL hasn't talked to one nappy headed black woman yet (nappy - natural haired).

    I can say one good about weave exportation tho - it contributes to helping people eat in India. I like India - because most of the people are brown and black. But they don't get much, and thus get cheated. They were even shaving off the babies hair. That part was interesting.

    He wasn't so much glamorizing the weaves and relaxers, but mainly talking about the hair industry, from the shaved heads in India, processed and manufactured, to the Bronners Brothers hair show in Atlanta, to the beauty supply.

    The funny and sad part was when Rock tried to sell black afro-textured hair to the beauty supply stores and NOBODY wanted it. It wasn't worth anything.


    One thing I found irritating... Ice T. Does Ice T really have any sayso about this since he is dating Coco? I think not. Get him outta there.

    It was informative, amusing, and a bit sad really, but worth a look-see. I give it a B.
     
  10. MsInterpret

    MsInterpret Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Oh but what about Chris Rock's wife? Look at her hair! I wonder if he told her to go natural.
     
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