Black People : George Bush ok's execution of Black GI

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by THE-GOD, Jul 29, 2008.

  1. THE-GOD

    THE-GOD Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Jul 9, 2008
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    President Bush could have commuted the death sentence of Ronald A. Gray, a former Army cook convicted of multiple rapes and murders.
    But Bush decided Monday that Gray's crimes were so repugnant that execution was the only just punishment.


    Bush's decision marked the first time in 51 years that a president has affirmed a death sentence for a member of the U.S. military. It was the first time in 46 years that such a decision has even been weighed in the Oval Office.
    Gray, 42, was convicted in connection with a spree of four allegend murders and eight rapes in the Fayetteville, N.C., area between April 1986 and January 1987 while he was stationed at Fort Bragg. He has been on death row at the U.S. Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., since April 1988.
    "While approving a sentence of death for a member of our armed services is a serious and difficult decision for a commander in chief, the president believes the facts of this case leave no doubt that the sentence is just and warranted," White House press secretary Dana Perino said
  2. MysteryDoors

    MysteryDoors Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Mar 4, 2008
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    Death sentences imposed by court-martial

    Bush OK's U.S. soldier's execution
    Gray was first tried by a civilian court in North Carolina and pleaded guilty to two murders and five rapes. He was sentenced to three consecutive and five concurrent life terms.

    He was then tried by a general court-martial at Fort Bragg. In April 1988, the court-martial convicted him of two murders, an attempted murder and three rapes. He was unanimously sentenced to death.

    Gray has unsuccessfully appealed his case through the military justice system. In 2001, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear the case.

    Bush received a recommendation in late 2005 from the secretary of the army to approve Gray's execution. Since then, it's been under review by the administration, including White House legal counsel.

    Gray has been on death row at the U.S. disciplinary barracks at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., since April 1998.

    It's not clear where the death sentence will be carried out. Military executions are handled by the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

    The military has also asked Bush to authorize the execution of army private Dwight J. Loving, who has been at Fort Leavenworth since 1989. He was convicted of killing two taxicab drivers while he was stationed at Fort Hood, Texas.

    The White House declined to discuss that case.
  3. Prizmm

    Prizmm Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Dec 1, 2007
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    +22 / -0

    Isn't it ironic.
    This piece of s**t president has the blood of more innocent people on his hands than either of these convicted felons has.
    On his direct orders literally hundreds of thousands of 'innocent civlilians' have lost their lives through, bombings, beatings, and gunfire.
    Yet he portends to care about law and justice....while scooter goes free, and Karl Rove ain't even an amerikkkan, can't be, not even the congress of this united states (Brother Conyers does not want to reveal how little power he really has other wise he would have that chump arrested) can bring this man to justice! These people and this administration has shown us that laws in amerikkka only apply to black men and women (Arthur White, NY/ Joe Horn, Tx) This is visual proof that the change so vociferously declared to have arrived in amerikkka is just words. When a known murderer, can authorize the death of a convicted murderer we have to ask ourselves...What is this truly about?
    Amazingly Bush has no clue how this looks, and in his position as the most powerful racist on earth, he is showing each of us that the constitution is below him and his cronies! For those who didn't know, no more excuses.