Black Spirituality Religion : Gelede Egbe: Yoruba Women's Sacred Society

Sekhemu

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QyAccording to Gelede in the Yoruba tradition, it is believed that older women have powers that are equal to or greater than those of the Orisha. The women are referred to as the "mothers" and are elders, ancestors and deities that have special spiritual powers that can be both beneficial, by providing fertility and health, and harmful by causing disaster, which is why the Gelede performances occur. The great grandmothres are also called Orisa Egbe, which means "gods of society." The term egbe also refers to the society of women who can turn into birds and hold secret meetings or observe secret meetings, whether it be secret male initiaion rituals or people in the community.

This concept of "mothers" is fundamentally important in Yoruba society, because without "our mothers," the Yoruba community would not exist in the world. Also, because of their ability to give birth, it is believed that women know the secret of life, therefore possessing the power to bring life into the world, and consequently take it out. This is the female form of Ase which is the power to bring things into existence.

http://academics.smcvt.edu/africanart/Arianne/Gelede%20history%20and%20power.htm
 
Sekhemu said:
According to Gelede in the Yoruba tradition, it is believed that older women have powers that are equal to or greater than those of the Orisha. The women are referred to as the "mothers" and are elders, ancestors and deities that have special spiritual powers that can be both beneficial, by providing fertility and health, and harmful by causing disaster, which is why the Gelede performances occur. The great grandmothres are also called Orisa Egbe, which means "gods of society." The term egbe also refers to the society of women who can turn into birds and hold secret meetings or observe secret meetings, whether it be secret male initiaion rituals or people in the community.

This concept of "mothers" is fundamentally important in Yoruba society, because without "our mothers," the Yoruba community would not exist in the world. Also, because of their ability to give birth, it is believed that women know the secret of life, therefore possessing the power to bring life into the world, and consequently take it out. This is the female form of Ase which is the power to bring things into existence.

http://academics.smcvt.edu/africanart/Arianne/Gelede%20history%20and%20power.htm

Ase!!!! Sekhemu

Long time no see. Thank you for info on Gelede egbe and the Iyaami, elder brother.

Blackbird
 
One thing we need to understand is the wisdom of our ancestors is immense. They have lived on this Earth for thousands of years and were able through those millennia, to establish, perfect and refine a system of living that brought balance and order to their lives. Sometimes, when we look at their system of living from indocrinated, albeit weary Western eyes, we oftimes miss the wisdom inherent. We pick apart certain components in their society, whether it be the Egungun, the Ogboni or even the Babalawos and we assume that our folks saw things through a masculine perspective and flavor. We miss the wealth of examples inherent, in the Yoruba society, for society that refutes any inclination we may have to assume men held an undecidedly higher position. One of my African mentors once remarked, "How can I be better than my own mother?"

Blackbird
 
Blackbird said:
One thing we need to understand is the wisdom of our ancestors is immense. They have lived on this Earth for thousands of years and were able through those millennia, to establish, perfect and refine a system of living that brought balance and order to their lives. Sometimes, when we look at their system of living from indocrinated, albeit weary Western eyes, we oftimes miss the wisdom inherent. We pick apart certain components in their society, whether it be the Egungun, the Ogboni or even the Babalawos and we assume that our folks saw things through a masculine perspective and flavor. We miss the wealth of examples inherent, in the Yoruba society, for society that refutes any inclination we may have to assume men held an undecidedly higher position. One of my African mentors once remarked, "How can I be better than my own mother?"

Blackbird

Well said brotha

The more I learn it seems the less I know.

I'm sure you can appreciate the understanding that the Orishas (male and female) exist inside of us.

That as Eniyan (human beings) we strive to live a life of balanced and gentle character (iwa pele).

Naturally this would include the recognition of the assimilaton and balancing of complimentary forces in nature.

As the saying goes, no nation can rise higher than the status of it's women, or something like that lol
 

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