Black People : Gary Tyler's Quest for Justice

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by oldsoul, Oct 2, 2007.

  1. OldSoul

    OldSoul Permanent Black Man PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Gary Tyler's Quest for Justice


    The history of the American legal system is scarred with instances of injustice: the Haymarket martyrs, Sacco and Vanzetti, the Scottsboro Boys, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. Add to this list the case of Gary Tyler, convicted of murder at the age of 16. Tyler's case was remarkable because at the time of his 1975 conviction, he was the nation's youngest death-row inmate. The spotlight dimmed when his sentence was commuted to life without the possibility of parole in 1977, a year after the US Supreme Court declared Louisiana's death penalty unconstitutional.
    Tyler, now 48, is living out his days in Louisiana's notorious Angola prison. A former slave plantation, Angola is home to 5,000 prisoners, 75 percent of whom are black. He has now spent years of his life behind bars because he was the wrong color in the wrong place at the wrong time.
    National interest in Tyler's case was revived by a recent series of articles by New York Times columnist Bob Herbert. In 1974 Tyler was on a school bus filled with African-American students who attended the formerly all-white Destrehan High School in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana. A white mob attacked the school bus. As Gary's brother Terry recalled years later to journalist Adam Nossiter in a piece published in The Nation, "They were on the attack, man. It was panic."
    Witnesses at the time said someone on the bus pointed out the window and yelled, "Look at that white boy with that gun." After several pops, a 13-year-old white student, Timothy Weber, lay wounded on the ground. Weber's cousin, Deputy Sheriff V.J. St. Pierre, rushed the boy to the hospital, where he later died from a gunshot wound. Later, white supremacist David Duke came to Destrehan to fan the flames of racial hatred.
    Herbert wrote, "That single shot in this rural town about 25 miles up the Mississippi River from New Orleans set in motion a tale of appalling injustice that has lasted to the present day." The police came onto the bus and Tyler was dragged off. Then came the beatings. As Juanita Tyler, Gary's mother, told Herbert, "One of the deputies had a strap and they whipped him with that. It was terrible. Finally, when they let me go in there, Gary was just trembling. He was frightened to death. He was trembling and rocking back and forth. They had kicked him all in his privates. He said, 'Mama, they kicked me. One kicked me in the front and one kicked in the back.' He said that over and over. I couldn't believe what they had done to my baby." An all-white jury found Tyler guilty of first-degree murder. Since his conviction, the four witnesses against him have recanted their testimony.
    The murder weapon, as Herbert reported, had been "stolen from a firing range used by the sheriff's deputies." It appeared out of nowhere as the murder weapon. The gun has since magically disappeared from the evidence room...
    ...In 1989, Louisiana Board of Pardons (LBP) voted 3 to 2 to commute Tyler's sentence from life to sixty years, making Tyler eligible for a speedy release from prison. But Louisiana Governor Charles "Buddy" Roemer, a Democrat facing an electoral challenge from David Duke, refused to issue a pardon....

     
  2. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

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    Is this not reason to take decisions like this out of the hands of politicians? Stanley "Took" Williams is dead because Arnold Swat a ni gger was facing re-election. And now this thing with Tyler.

    This generation of Blacks coming up now is unlike any in the past. Since whites are teaching us that we cannot expect to find justice in the courts our children will execute it in the streets. Whites think they can lock a few of us up like they did Michael Bell and the rest will cow into submission. Let them keep thinking that.
     
  3. Sami_RaMaati

    Sami_RaMaati Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Louisiana's criminal just-us system is inherently unfair to Black people.

    I heard an interview on Al Sharpton's show last week with a Black attorney who is currently trying a murder case in Louisiana. He also practices law in California. Some of the things he mentioned were:

    In the criminal courts in Louisiana, the defendants are overwhelmingly Black. In the civil courts in Louisiana, the defendants are overwhelmingly white.

    In criminal trials in Louisiana (majority Black defendants), the prosecutor is allowed to hide exculpatory evidence from defense attorneys. In Cali (as well as in my home state Illinois) it is illegal and unethical for prosecutors to do this. In civil cases (with majority white defendants), they are not allowed to do this.

    In Cali criminal trials, the jury is allowed to take notes and refer to them when deliberating on a verdict. This is important due to the fact that a large number of witnesses can be called and it's important to be able to sort out who said what. This is not allowed in Lousiana in criminal trials (with majority Black defendants), but is allowed in civil trials (with majority white defedants).

    In criminal trials California jurors can also request that relevant transcripts be read back to them during deliberations as an aid to ascertaining the truth. In Louisiana, this is not allowed in criminal trials (majority Black defedants) but is allowed in civil trials (majority white defendants).

    Other things brought up were:

    The jury that convicted Mychal Bell was all white, raising a serious constitutional issue (not tried by a jury of his peers). Nothing more to be said here.

    Mychal Bell was misrepresented by a negro public defender who didn't call any defense witnesses or cross examine the prosecution witnesses. Thus, Mychal Bell was denied effective legal representation. This is a serious constitutional issue.

    Next move should be to overhaul the criminal just-us system in Louisiana.
     
  4. Sami_RaMaati

    Sami_RaMaati Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Agreed.

    White racists don't care about guilt or innocence. They want someone Black -- any Black person will do -- to pay for the killing of a white person. They've been showing us that for how many decades? That's why they continue their obsession with OJ.

    Off topic a bit, but could you repost the url for the website you created for people who've left Christianity and needed a resource to deal with repercussions from fire and brimstone family members?
     
  5. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

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    No problem. Look in my signature and click on Ebony Botunde

    Why do you think they call it the 'criminal' justice system? Because there's something criminal about this just us system.

    But don't get the wrong impression about California. I lived there for 22 years and I know. They have all those laws and programs because they are not the kind of people who will do the right thing if there's not a law saying they have to and they are very skillull at getting around the law.
     
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