Black People : From The Hood To Doing Good

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by cherryblossom, Apr 3, 2009.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Johnny Wimbrey: From the Hood to Doing Good

    Johnny Wimbrey is a best selling author, an international keynote/motivational speaker and a success coach and trainer. He’s also about to host his own television show—“The Johnny Show.” I spoke to Johnny Wimbrey about his road to success, his latest book From the Hood to Doing Good, and about being an entrepreneur.

    Young Money: Tell me about your life.
    Johnny Wimbrey: I just wrote a book about my life: From the Hood to Doing Good. My earliest memories are of a battered woman’s shelter, street violence and street life, and crazy stuff like smoking weed at age 8. My earliest memories are of being homeless, my abusive, alcoholic father, selling crack at age 14, people selling it for me at age 16.

    I was an entrepreneur without direction, a product of my environment. I made a lot of bad decisions, one of my friends murdered at 18—he was a junior in high school. He wasn’t my first friend to die but I knew the guy who murdered him. I went to his wake and had a gun in my pocket. I was going to pay my respects and retaliate. But my friend’s mother forgave the young man who had killed her son. I felt dumb because she had compassion, so I gave my gun to the preacher and I said I can’t live like this anymore. That was February1993. I focused on turning my life around and focused on beating the odds. According to statistics, I am supposed to be in prison, an alcoholic, but I wanted to beat the odds. I had mastered the art of taking risks in the street so when I got into the business world I didn’t lose my fight or my hustle. I brought my street mentality to my business mentality.

    I got involved in life insurance. I became Regional Vice President because I didn’t understand failure or how to give up. The state of Texas declined to give me an insurance license because I had a felony arrest. But I concentrated on becoming better instead of bitter, so I contacted the judge’s office who had given me the felony arrest, in Fort Worth, Texas. I told the judge that I was trying to change my life. I asked him if he could write a letter asking them to give me another chance. One week later my license came in the mail and I hit the ground running.

    At age 25 I got involved in Internet marketing. This is where my life was turned around. I was making residual income from the comfort of my home. I was in the top 1% of income in America.

    Becoming a speaker and a trainer came naturally to me. I refused to allow someone else’s opinion to become my reality. Most people are moving without purpose. They are moving to someone else’s beat, someone else’s passion. Who would have thought that I would have another chance, knowing that I should be dead or in prison?

    http://www.youngmoney.com/entertainment/personalities/Johnny_Wimbrey
     
  2. oldiesman

    oldiesman Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    a beautiful story of perserverance and the desire to be a success instead of a statistic.
     
  3. Kamau47

    Kamau47 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Though I have not read this, I must take exception to the word "hood" and the negative image it portrays in this title. It almost sounds as if there's nothing good in the "hood". If so, that is misrepresenting.
    Personally, I live in the hood (only 1 block from where I grew up). There's high unemployment, crime, drug use, broken glass, yards with no grass; the stereo-typical "hood".
    But in all this, there is beauty. There are children running around playing, brothers & sisters playing spades out back, young black teens (boys & girls) walking their babies, laughing, etc. In other words, in this "hood", there are signs of life, goodness and hope.
    I for one had the opportunity to leave long ago, but decided that this was home and that I would not give up on it. I have seen other cities, states, countries, and yet found no place else I'd rather be other than here. The hood is my home.
    I use to subscribe to the notion of nothing good in the hood until I watched tv. When I watch movies & tv shows showing South Central L.A., you see a section of L.A. that if you travel there, you see a different scene. I won't deny that it a rough city, but it's nothing like what is portrayed in the media. It's not all down & out.
    The "hood" is not all bad, just like the "suburbs" is not all good. That title is misleading.

    just my 2-cents worth.
     
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Yes, this is a showcase example that we are not merely identical reflections of our environments. I commend this young man for pulling himself up and for reaching back for others.
     
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