Health and Wellness : Fried Fish May Explain 'Stroke Belt' Mystery

Discussion in 'Black Health and Wellness' started by Amnat77, Dec 24, 2010.

  1. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    MyHealthNewsDaily Staff Writer
    LiveScience.com rachael Rettner
    myhealthnewsdaily Staff Writer
    livescience.com – Thu Dec 23, 8:50 am ET

    Too much fried fish may contribute to the high rate of stroke in America's "stroke belt," according to a new study.

    The results showed that people living in the stroke belt - including residents of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas and Louisiana - were about 30 percent more likely to eat two or more servings of fried fish every week than those living in the rest of the country, the researchers said.

    And blacks who are known to have an increased risk of stroke regardless of where they live, were more than 3.5 times more likely to eat two or more servings of fried fish per week than whites.

    Inhabitants of the stroke belt are 20 percent more likely to die from stroke than those living in the rest of the country. And those in the stroke "buckle" - an area of the stroke belt that includes the coastal plains of North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia - are 40 percent more likely to die from stroke, said study researcher Fadi Nahab of Emory University in Atlanta.

    Fried fish, Nahab said, may be contributing to these racial and geographic disparities.

    [Related: Demanding relatives may raise heart risks in middle age]

    Eating fish can be healthy - fish are key sources of omega-3 fatty acids, which previous studies have shown to be associated with reduced risk of heart attack and stroke. The American Heart Association recommends people consume at least two meals containing fish per week.

    However, there is evidence that frying fish reduces their amount of omega-3 fatty acids, Nahab said. Frying is also associated with an increase in the food's fat and calorie content.

    Nahab and his colleagues examined the fish intake of 21,675 people living in the stroke belt, stroke buckle and rest of the United States.

    Overall, just 23 percent of participants ate the recommended two or more servings of non-fried fish per week. Residents of the stroke belt were 17 percent less likely to adhere to these recommendations than people in the rest of the country, the researchers said. Blacks ate more fish on the whole compared with whites, and they consumed higher amounts of fried fish.

    "The differences in dietary fish consumption, and specific cooking methods - frying - may contribute to the higher rates of stroke among those who live in the stroke belt and among African-Americans," Nahab told MyHealthNewsDaily.

    By eating more non-fried fish, especially fatty fish that have higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids, or taking fish oil supplements, some cases of stroke could be prevented, Nahab said.


    The study is published online today (Dec. 22) in the journal Neurology. The work was funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the National Institutes of Health, and the Department of Health and Human Services. General Mills provided funding for coding of the food-frequency questionnaire completed by study participants.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/friedfishmayexplainstrokebeltmystery
     
  2. Full Speed

    Full Speed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Very informative. I live and work in the stroke belt and believe this report to be on point. We love our fish frys, myself included. But, there are times when we have stroke patients one after another, after another, after another. The racial difference is also noticable. We see more Black stroke victims than White...guestimate about 10 - 15% more Blacks than Whites, but thats just a guestimate.

    When my family eat fish at home, it's always baked. When I cook fish at work, I always bake it as well. But, at family gatherings, community "cook outs", or work gatherings, the fish is ALWAYS fried.

    I wonder if the type of fish makes a difference?? Around here, the fish frys are ALWAYS catfish and/or crappie. At home or work, I eat Salmon or tilapia.
     
  3. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Yeah the type of fish matters. This is one thing a nutritionist explains to diabetics. Catfish and shellfish are bottom feeders and should be avoided. Salmon and Halibut are preferred. Part of the problem is the type of cooking oil used. I know some black people who still cook with Crisco. This is why I cant eat some of my older relatives cooking. Diabetes is prevalent in my family. When I talk to some of them they tell me I'm not supposed to cook/fry with olive oil. But that's not what my nutritionist told me when I was living in Texas.
     
  4. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Same here, diabetes runs in my family and my father died of a stroke....

    what rationale did they give regarding the the olive oil thing?
     
  5. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    The only rationale is that they tell me they were told that we are not supposed to cook with olive oil. I have been to many of a Greek/Mediterranean restaurant in my day and they have told me otherwise.

    As the following suggests, I tend to use olive oil (when I am able) for frying and when grilling because of its effect on lowering high triglyceride levels.

    http://www.oliveoilsource.com/page/diabetes
     
  6. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Check out this article.

    http://www.palestineoliveoil.org/faq/recipes/fryingwitholiveoil.htm

    "Recent investigations have shown that frying is beneficial to the organism, particularly from the physiological point of view. Because of this, it has extended to areas where formerly it was not as popular. Whether the food fried is digested easily or lies heavily on the stomach depends to a great extent on the type of oil used, the temperature of the oil and the manner in which the food was fried. Studies undertaken on healthy subjects and patients with gastroduodenal problems (gastritis, ulcer, liver and biliary complaints) have shown that there is no relationship between food fried in olive oil and these illnesses."


    Olive oil is ideal for frying. In proper temperature conditions, without over-heating, it undergoes no substantial structural change and keeps its nutritional value better than other oils, not only because of the antioxidants but also due to its high levels of oleic acid.
     
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