Black People Politics : Freedom Rider: Wilson Goode, Barack Obama and the Good Negro

Discussion in 'Black People Politics' started by RAPTOR, Sep 27, 2013.

  1. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    by BAR editor and senior columnist Margaret Kimberley
    In the documentary Let the Fire Burn, former Philadelphia mayor Wilson Good comes off as the hollowest man, dissembling, changing his story and evading questions but ultimately admitting that he approved the horrific plan which killed little children.” He ordered the burning of MOVE because he believed in “the natural order of white people being on top and killing black people if they choose to.”
    Imagine a black man leading a lynch mob and you have a good assessment of Wilson Goode’s behavior.”
    On May 13, 1985, the mayor of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, allowed a lynch mob comprised of the police and fire departments to kill eleven black people, including five children. He also allowed them to burn 61 houses to the ground which left more than 200 people homeless. Wilson Goode was that city’s first black mayor but being mayor was not his top priority. More than anything else he wanted to be a good negro and earn a stamp of approval from white people. Therein lies a cautionary tale which we would do well to remember today.

    A new documentary, Let the Fire Burn, tells the story of the assault on a home occupied by men, women and children who were members of the group MOVE. The extra judicial murders took place nearly 30 years ago but offer lessons for black people who support and excuse any horror committed by the first black president, Barack Obama.

    Let the Fire Burn assembles archival film footage showing the numerous confrontations that took place between MOVE and the police over many years. When an attempt to arrest MOVE members resulted in the death of a police officer in 1978, Delbert Africa was savagely beaten in full view of the public and the media. He and eight others were convicted of murder and sentenced to prison terms ranging from 30 to 100 years. Police surveillance of MOVE never stopped, and the group’s conflicts with their neighbors resulted in the 1985 decision to evict them from a house located at 6221 Osage Avenue.

    Not only the cops on the beat but officials at the highest levels of city government had nothing but contempt for black life.”

    No one watching Let the Fire Burn has to be told that the same police officers who beat Delbert Africa in 1978 and who were then permitted to take part in the 1985 eviction were racist to the core. The expressions of hatred are plain enough to see. Not only the cops on the beat but officials at the highest levels of city government had nothing but contempt for black life and their decision to drop a bomb in a residential neighborhood proves it.

    Despite the obvious hatred of the white men in the police force, it is Wilson Goode who emerges as the villain in this story. Goode comes off as the hollowest man, dissembling, changing his story and evading questions but ultimately admitting that he approved the horrific plan which killed little children. He waffled between taking responsibility, claiming he didn’t know a bomb would be dropped, to saying that snow on his television gave him the impression that the fire was being extinguished.

    The commission findings and the pontification ultimately meant very little. The MOVE members died and their neighbors lost their homes because they were black.Those homes were rebuilt but so shoddily that they were once again abandoned. Wilson Goode knew the rules. He may have been elected with strong support from black voters but he knew he was not supposed to change what has become the natural order of white people being on top and killing black people if they choose to.

    Imagine a black man leading a lynch mob and you have a good assessment of Wilson Goode’s behavior. His complicity in killing the MOVE men, women and children didn’t hurt his prospects the way it should have. In 1987 he was re-elected when he ran against Democrat turned Republican Frank Rizzo. That former mayor’s open racism and switch to the Republicans allowed Goode to once again win black votes despite his awful actions.
    Read more:http://www.blackagendareport.com/content/freedom-rider-wilson-goode-barack-obama-and-good-negro
     
  2. Khasm13

    Khasm13 STAFF STAFF

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    i remember this...smh

    one love
    khasm
     
  3. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Democracy Now - "Today marks the 30th anniversary of a massive police operation in Philadelphia that culminated in the
    helicopter bombing of the headquarters of a radical group known as MOVE. The fire from the attack incinerated six adults
    and five children, and destroyed 65 homes. Despite two grand jury investigations and a commission finding that top
    officials were grossly negligent, no one from city government was criminally charged. MOVE was a Philadelphia-based
    radical movement dedicated to black liberation and a back-to-nature lifestyle. It was founded by John Africa, and all its
    members took on the surname Africa. We are joined in Philadelphia by Linn Washington, an award-winning journalist,
    professor and former columnist for The Philadelphia Tribune who has covered MOVE since 1975."
    http://www.democracynow.org/2015/5/13/move_bombing_at_30_barbaric_1985
     
  4. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Move Incident in Philadelphia / Radical African American group
    MOVE is an organization formed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1972 by John Africa (born Vincent Leaphart) and Donald Glassey described by CNN as "a loose-knit, mostly black group whose members all adopted the surname Africa, advocated a back-to-nature lifestyle and preached against technology." The dreadlocked members also disrupted meetings and lectures.


    Supposed co-founder of MOVE and purchaser of home that was eventually demolished.
    Donald Glassey


    PHOTO ESSAY

    The 1985 Move Incident



    What is Glassey up to these days?


    He's a Yoga/Meditation Instructor


    Meditation Instructor, Brother DONALD J. GLASSEY, MSW, DC, LMT

    Dr. Glassey graduated from Michigan State University in 1968, the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Work in1970, and Pennsylvania College of Chiropractic in 1982. He began his Kriya Yoga spiritual path after reading Autobiography of a Yogi by Paramahamsa Yogananda. Dr. Glassey met his teacher, Roy Eugene Davis, a direct disciple of Parmahamsa Yogananda in 1983. Dr. Glassey is a certified meditation teacher who has been teaching meditation for over twenty years. In 2009 he was ordained by Mr. Davis to initiate students into Kriya Yoga. He currently teaches meditation techniques for two YTT 200 programs. In addition to teaching meditation, he also instructs the students in Anatomy and Physiology, offers a “Meditation Teacher Training Certificate Program” and conducts Kriya Yoga Initiations at Yoga Loft.


    Guess sharing his connection with MOVE doesn't fit with his current resume?


    But though I share sympathies with the ideologies the group had/has, how were they "going off the grid", while still technically being on the grid, and bringing attention to it?

    Many, if not most groups or people that desire to be left alone, find an isolated area (which doesn't help that much either when the nosy bloodhounds come). But my point is, was the organization really an organization about disconnecting themselves from government oversight and control, or were they misguiding into something other than that which could have had more of a practical and sustainable effect?

    Do we learn from our mistakes?
    Was this a mistake to team up with a "white" man, that purportedly turned and testified against them?


    Images of John Africa and Glassey

    Read this article on Donald Glassey, so called co-founder of MOVE

    "They could come and kill me. They're raving lunatics,"
    -MOVE co-founder, Donald Glassey commenting on the group after May 13th 1985

    Was this or was this not the co-founder of MOVE?
    And why is the "white" man supposedly behind MOVE rarely, if ever mentioned?
     
  5. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  6. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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