Black Spirituality Religion : Forest pygmies heed spirit world

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by panafrica, May 7, 2006.

  1. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/4978034.stm
     
  2. Moorfius

    Moorfius Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    TWI people were the Origenal builders of so-called Kemet*

    Hotep

    The corrupt word that the TWI people take offence to is a european word derogatory in nature as all other names given to the people in Africa. The so-called Pygmies call them self "Baka" (people of the African rain forest) which means "Soldier" or Worrier. BA-KA are both very ancient Kemetic words that has to do with the spirt and soul and further evidence of the origens of this very ancient African people. The Baka are known as "The Old Ones" by all other so-called Africans. http://www.tehutionline.com/newpage1.htm
    http://www.aldokkan.com/egypt/menes.htm

    Ase`

    Note: The passages in the pyrimids forces the average hight person to bow and stoop down to enter...it is said that the BaKa can walk through standing up because of them being just right for entery into the passageways beneaith these structures built by the ancient ones.
     
  3. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

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    I have to agree, pygmie is a very derogatory moniker. It carries with it the connotation of a people who are subhuman. Maybe three-fifths humanLOL.

    I'm just thankful that they are able to hold on to their beliefs without the infiltration of "missionaries" trying to "save" them.

    Thanks Pan and welcome to this part of the woods.
     
  4. Alexandra

    Alexandra Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Old Ones indeed. I have always held the belief that my Ancestors, the Bushpeople were the original Africans. I am still searching for a satisfactory explanation that will explain the vast physical differences between the Africans in the West and those further down South. The Western ones tend to be very tall, and very dark which is in complete contrast to their lighter skinned, much shorter counterparts in the South.

    Alexandra
     
  5. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    The Aka or Bayaka[1] are a nomadic Mbenga pygmy people who live by hunting. Although the Aka people call themselves BiAka, they are also known as Babenzele in Western Central African Republic and Northwest Congo (RPC).
    They live in a variety of terrains in southwestern Central African Republic and northern Congo (Brazzaville region), in 11 different ecological zones of the Western Congo Basin. They are a related, but distinct, people from the Baka people of Cameroon, Gabon, northern Congo, and southwestern Central African Republic.
    The BiAka have a high predominance of the L1 genetic haplotype, which is believed to be the most divergent human dNA haplotype. It is believed that the modern human ancestor developed in the East Africa area, where the Efé (and other Mbuti) and the Hadzabe of Tanzania also exhibit the L1 haplotype. During a period of "interglacial optimum" weather, the Sahara became lush and green, allowing easy migration along its southern border. It is theorized that during this period, migration of early man occurred from the Eastern Congo basin to the Western Congo basin. The BiAka therefore represent some of the most distinct existing modern humans.
    They were featured in the July 1995 National Geographic article "Ndoki: the Last Place on Earth".[2]

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    The Aka tribe gain sustenance from 63 plant species, 20 insect species, honey from 8 species of bees, and 28 species of game. They also trade with their farmer neighbors for agricultural goods and, more recently, often plant their own small seasonal crops.
    These hunter-gatherers have a symbiotic market relationship with neighboring villagers (collectively known as Ngandu). While the Ngandu are primarily farmers, they will also occasionally hunt for bushmeat, and also keep domesticated livestock. They exchange their village goods, including crops of manioc, plantain, yams, taro, maize, cucumbers, squash, okra, papaya, mango, pineapple, palm oil, and rice for the bushmeat, honey, and other forest products the Aka collect. There are over 15 different village tribes with whom the approximately 30,000 Aka associate.
    Their hunter-gatherer lifestyle exposes them to blood of jungle fauna, thus they have among the highest rates of seropositivity for Ebola virus in the world.[3]
    Fathers of the Aka tribe spend more time in close contact to their babies than in any other known society. Aka fathers have their infant within arms reach 47% of the time and have been described as the "best Dads in the world."[4] Males unable to obtain multiple wives as a result of belonging to the lowest rungs of the economy substitute resources for parental obligations. It has been observed that they pick up, cuddle, and play with their babies at least five times as often as fathers in other societies. It is believed that this is due to the strong bond between Aka husband and wife. Throughout the day, couples share hunting, food preparation, and social and leisure activities. The more time Aka parents spend together, the greater the father's loving interaction with his baby.[5]
    Unlike the Mbuti pygmies of the eastern Congo (who speak only the language of the tribes with whom they are affiliated), the Aka speak their own language along with whichever of the approximately 15 Bantu peoples they are affiliated.
    In 2003, the oral traditions of the Aka were proclaimed one of the Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aka_people
     
  6. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    The Baka, known in the Congo as Bayaka (Bebayaka, Bebayaga, Bibaya),[1] are an ethnic group inhabiting the southeastern rainforests of Cameroon, northern Republic of Congo, northern Gabon, and southwestern Central African Republic. They are sometimes called a subgroup of the Twa, but the two peoples are not closely related. Likewise, the name "Baka" is sometimes mistakenly applied to other area peoples who, like the Baka and Twa, have been historically called pygmies (the term is no longer considered respectful).

    The Baka live relatively symbiotically with their Bantu neighbours. They often set their camps along roadsides to better facilitate trade; the Baka provide forest game in exchange for produce and manufactured goods. Nevertheless, exploitation of the Baka by other ethnic groups is a grave reality, especially since the Baka are still largely unaccustomed to the cash-based economy. Non-Baka sometimes hire Baka as labourers, for example, but pay them virtually nothing for a full day's work. Or, conscious of the tourism potential, some non-Baka arrange visits or stays in Baka villages or arrange Baka guides for visitors to forest reserves, often with little compensation to the Baka. Rates of Baka-Bantu intermarriage are also on the rise. Baka who marry outside their ethnic group typically adopt the lifestyle of their non-Baka spouse. The Baka are among the oldest inhabitants of Cameroon and the neighbouring countries. Their semi-nomadic lifestyle has persisted largely unchanged for thousands of years, despite the fact that during colonialism, the Baka's prowess at elephant hunting prompted ivory-hungry German and French overlords to force them to settle in roadside villages where their talents could be more easily exploited. The government of Cameroon, while stopping short of forced settlement, has attempted to maintain this policy through government incentives and regulations such as mandatory schooling for all children. However, the Baka largely resist. Today, the greatest threat to their way of life comes from competition for the forest. This is from multinational logging, mining and plantation interests; expansion of plantations due to a growing population of refugees and unemployed migrant workers. As the forests disappear, the animals and plants upon which the Baka rely vanish as well, yet so far the work of conservation groups such as WWF has worsened the situation by not taking into account the Baka's role in maintaining forest diversity and turning groups of Baka subsistence hunters into persecuted poachers.

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baka_(Cameroon_and_Gabon)
     
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