Amun-Ra : Fight to the Death

Discussion in 'Amun-Ra' started by Amun-Ra, Nov 8, 2001.

  1. Amun-Ra

    Amun-Ra Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Does anybody remember why they Palestinians and the Israelis are fighting? Do they even remember why they are fighting? More importantly, does anyone really care?

    These are not questions to be taken lightly although it seems that it no longer makes a difference. Unfortunately, the reason for the seemingly endless struggle may be locked away in hate-fogged memories and myopic views of revenge and retaliation, or it may have been forgotten altogether in the endless bloodshed and carnage.

    It seems that the same conflict has been going on forever. Has there ever been peace in the Middle East? Even since Biblical times there has been constant turmoil and war with no end in sight. Why is peace an anathema to the Middle East? What ever the answer, it is long past due as that same unrest is now seeping into the rest of the world with Islamic extremist bent on bringing the world to war.

    Perhaps, it is far past time to reevaluate of relationship with Israel and it seems that the United States is doing just that after the September 11 World Trade Center catastrophe. We have been one of the Israelis staunchest allies and they have been ours, but is it time to reevaluate the alliance? According to Israel, they don’t plan on having a solution at their expense and of course neither do their Arab neighbors.

    Whatever the answer, we can no longer ignore the Middle East as it has come to our doorstep and knocked the door down after terrorists crashed passenger jets into the Pentagon and the World trade Center Towers last month. Still, why are these people fighting? What are they fighting for or against?

    As a journalist I am tempted to research the subject, but instead I decided to rely on my feelings about it rather than dig back through the dusty news reels, yellowed newsclips and forgotten UN resolutions. I have lived with the fighting in the Middle East for as long as I can remember and I still don’t know for sure what it is about and at this point I really don’t care.

    That is not a cavalier attitude speaking but rather a pragmatic view of a situation that has not changed for ages. It is the sarcastic spouting of a soul that thinks “just let them fight it out and whoever wins becomes our new best friends.” There have been attempts at peace and all have failed and the fighting has continued. Both sides are caught in a closed-loop of revenge, retaliation and reliving the past. No new ground has been broken, nor will it be broken as long as minds continue to live in the past with no thought for the future. At what point does man weary of war? Or, does the constant fighting make it seem that life is meant to be lived that way?

    We cannot abandon our allies nor can we allow this fighting to continue endlessly until it spills over the brim and the whole world is at war. It is past time that we get the Israelis and the rest of the Middle East to stop and if that means angering the Israelis then let them be angry. If it means angering the Arabs states, let them be angry, but let them stop fighting and start thinking about moving into the 21st century.

    A real effort needs to be made to resolve the real issues that afflict most of the Middle East. We have stood idly by and done nothing for so long as it stayed in the Middle East. That time is past and if we don’t want to become embroiled in the same endless war, it is time we stepped on a few toes, bent a few stiff backs and made the peace table a number one priority—or—give everyone guns and bombs and let them fight until there is no one standing, then we will declare peace.

    Exasperated

    :mad:
     
  2. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    Ra......

    I have no clue
    no answers yet i
    watch close
    what have our world came too!?
    the world is headed for self destruction!:(
     
  3. Amun-Ra

    Amun-Ra Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Don't Know

    It just seems like there is no real effort toward peace--none--this has been going on since Biblical times it seems--I, for one, am tired of it andjust about everyone involved.

    Ra
     
  4. epiphany

    epiphany Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Amun-Ra

    Amun_ra, before September 11, I can honestly say I wasn't interested in matters of the middle east, I would see it on the
    news, but I never bothered to find out why.
    Now, with everything happening and the different viewpoints
    concerning the United States policies and Israel, I must admit
    it began to peak my interest. Yes, I think it is very important that
    we know whats going on over there, because it may in the long run impact us more then even... we know. It is another example of people being oppressed by a political bully, in a country that doesn't even belong to them.
    When I checked out this thread, I decided to do a little research of my own, to try to get an idea of whats behind all the animosity.
    It was a very interesting read. Unfortunately, I couldn't get all the information, but I did get the most important. I would like to share
    it with you and others.




    The conflict between the Palestinian Arabs and the Jews
    is a modern phenomenon, which began around the turn
    of the 20th century. Although, these two groups have different religions (Palestinians include Muslim, Christian
    and Druze), religious differences are not the cause of the
    conflict......it is the struggle over the land. Until 1948, the area that both groups claimed was known internationally
    as Palestine. Following the war of 1948-1949, this land
    was divided into three parts.the state of Israel, the West
    Bank ( of the Jordan River) and the Gaza strip.

    Jewish claims to this land are based on the biblical promise
    to Abraham and his decendants, on the fact that this was the historical site of Israel and on the Jews need for haven from European anti-Semitism. The Palestinian Arabs claims to the land are based on continuous residence in the country for hundreds of years and the fact that they represent the demographic majority. The Arabs maintained that since they are the decendants of Abraham's son Ishmael, then the promise also includes them as well.
    They felt they should not have to forfeit their land for injustices put upon the Jews by the Europeans. The Jews wanted a land where they could be identified as a race. They chose Palestine as the site of Jewish origin. The Zionist movement began in 1882
    with the first wave of European Jewish immigration to Palestine.

    In short, Jews took occupation over Palestine. In 1948,
    ( there was a lot of info between, I just got the jist of it)British evacuated Palestine, and Zionist leaders proclaimed the state as Israel. Neighboring Arab states (Egypt, Syria, Jordan, and Iraq) then invaded Israel claiming to "save" Palestine from the Zionist.

    In fact, the Arab rulers had territorial designs on Palestine and were no more anxious to see a Palestinian Arab state emerge than the Zionist. In June of 1948, The Arab-Israel war was in doubt, Czechoslovakia shipped arms to Israel and with the weapons superiority gain control over the territories, Israel and beyond the state. In 1949, the war between Israel and the Arabs states ended with the signing of an armistice agreement. The country once known as Palestine was now
    divided into three parts, each under separate political control. The State of Israel encompassed over 77 percent
    of the territory. Jordan occupied East Jerusalem and the
    hill country of central Palestine (The West Bank)
    Egypt took control of the coastal plain around the city
    of Gaza (the Gaza Strip). The Palestinian Arab state envision by the Un partition plan was never establish.
    As a result of the fighting in Palestine/Israel between 1947
    and 1949 over 700,000 Palestinian Arabs became refugees.
    After the Israeli occupation, 75% of refugees were expelled through Israeli military actions, psychological campaigns
    aimed at frightening Arabs into leaving, and direct
    expulsions. There are well-documents cases of massacres and atrocities that led to large-scale flight.
    The most infamous atrocity occurred in Deir Yasin a village
    near Jerusalem, where estimates of the number of Arab
    residents killed in cold blood by Israeli fights range from about 125 to over 250.

    Amun-ra, as I typed this, I was soooo angry, because it has been this kind of devastation, that these people have wreaked
    all over this world on people of color. This is what I mean about educating ourselves, we cannot rely on the US media
    to be honest with whats really going on. I have heard bits and pieces of what this war was all about basically from Israel's perspective.

    The standpoint of the Palestinian, some experts have come on
    and spoke of the atrocities that Israel inflicts on Palestinians
    and it is a drop in the bucket compared to what these people
    are dealing with in a land that belongs to them. Its the
    same old story of taking something that doesn't belong
    to them and wanting the whole pie, at the expense of the
    indigenous inhabitants. It was done to the Aborigine, the
    American Indian, The South American Aztecs were completely eliminated. We should not be so comfortable to realize, that it is (in a much smaller scale) and could happen to us. As usual, the United states is backing Israel in this interest........and thats why, they are hated.

    Not to be alarming, but I think that we have so become accustom to the lies, all of us...black and white...that we don't even search
    for the deeper reasoning.....I wouldn't be surprise, if we delve deeper to find that those countries were all a part of Africa...millions of years ago.... so we could be ancestrally related. They are being oppressed by the same regime as we are and have been. To not see that is a oversight and the best policy used
    for division.........through that division, who can really see the truth, until you stop and think....to begin peeling off the layers of
    deception to see the naked and rotten truth.


    If you are interested in reading the complete story...

    the link is www.merip.org/palestine-israel_primer/intro-pal-isr-primer.html

    I think you will find it interesting, informative and sad.



    Epiphany :heart:
     
  5. dnommo

    dnommo Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    In 1947 the United Nations (UN) adopted a resolution to partition the disputed region of Palestine into Jewish and Arab states. Arabs rejected the plan but Jews accepted it, declaring the independent state of Israel in 1948. War broke out between Arabs and Jews after the creation of Israel. When the fighting ended in 1949, Israel had gained more land than had been allocated to it by the UN resolution. After armistice agreements, Egypt (which had fought on the side of the Palestinians) retained control of the Gaza Strip (an area just north of Egypt), and Jordan (also a Palestinian ally) kept the West Bank, a territory west of the Jordan River that it annexed in 1950. Palestinians in the West Bank thus became Jordanian citizens, and those who stayed in Israel eventually became Israeli citizens. Palestinians who stayed in the Gaza Strip or fled to other countries became refugees.

    In June 1964 the PLO was founded at a summit meeting of the Arab League, an association of Arab-speaking countries, in Jerusalem. The PLO was established to provide a more legitimate and organized channel for Palestinian nationalism than was offered by independent Palestinian guerrilla groups. Later some of these groups would join the PLO, including Fatah, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP), Saiqa, and the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine (DFLP). Professional, labor, and student groups also joined the PLO, but over time the fedayeen proved dominant. The PLO was dedicated to organizing Palestinian people “to recover their usurped homes” and, according to its charter, to replacing Israel with a secular Palestinian state. The PLO's fedayeen were divided between those who, like Fatah, thought these goals should be achieved by Palestinians only and others who, like the PFLP, believed Arabs from all parts of the Middle East should unite to liberate Palestine.

    In its early years the PLO was based mostly in Jordan, and it sponsored many guerrilla and terrorist acts both in Israel and internationally. Although proven otherwise, the PLO denied, however, taking part in some dramatic terrorist raids by Arab fedayeen, such the murder of 11 Israeli athletes at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, Germany. In March 1968 PLO fedayeen won fame by repelling an Israeli attack on the PLO's Jordanian bases, less than a year after Arabs had suffered a devastating defeat by losing control of the West Bank, Gaza Strip, and the Golan Heights region of Syria to Israel during the Six-Day War. In 1969 Yasir Arafat, the leader of Fatah, was elected chairman of the PLO. PLO raids into Israel drew increasingly devastating reprisals on Jordan, and by late 1970 Jordan and the PLO entered a short, bloody war, after which most PLO fedayeen fled to Lebanon. As in Jordan, the PLO soon became a state within a state, raiding Israel and heightening tensions that culminated in the Lebanese Civil War (1975-1990). Syria, originally supportive of the PLO, feared that a victory by Lebanon's radical Muslim left (with whom the PLO was allied) would provoke Israel and lead to a full-scale Arab-Israeli war. Wanting to prevent regional warfare, Syria invaded Lebanon in 1976, attacking the Muslim-PLO forces. As a result, the PLO was often on the defensive throughout the late 1970s.

    The PLO did, however, achieve several diplomatic victories. In 1974 Arab nations at an Arab League summit meeting in Rabat, Morocco, recognized the PLO as the “sole legitimate representative of the Palestinian people.” Previously the Arab countries had considered themselves the Palestinians' representatives. In another important victory, in December 1974 Arafat addressed the United Nations (UN), where the PLO was granted status as an observer despite the objections of Israel.

    In 1982 Israel invaded Lebanon to stop PLO raids across its northern border. The invasion severely weakened the PLO, intensified splits among its factions, and forced some 12,000 PLO members in Beirut to flee once more, this time to several Arab countries. PLO members loyal to Arafat made their headquarters in Tunis, Tunisia, where an Israeli bombing raid severely damaged the main buildings in October 1985. After the 1982 invasion, several thousand Palestinians, including members of the PLO, stayed in Lebanon in refugee camps. After Israel withdrew most of its forces from Lebanon in 1985, some of these Palestinian refugees and other Palestinians who returned to Lebanon tried to reestablish a foothold for the PLO there. These efforts led to several confrontations between the PLO and Muslim forces loyal to Syria.

    In 1987 Palestinians in the Gaza Strip began a spontaneous uprising, known as the intifada, against Israeli occupation. The PLO and other groups supported the uprising, which quickly spread to the West Bank. At the same time several events led the PLO to reverse its call for the end of Israel. First, the United States, which had led several peace efforts in the Middle East, reiterated that before it would include the PLO in peace talks, the PLO would have to accept Israel's existence and renounce terrorism. Second, in 1988 Jordan's King Hussein relinquished to the PLO all claims to the West Bank, which Jordan had lost to Israel in 1967. Arafat seized the opportunity to call for a Palestinian state in the Occupied Territories (the West Bank and Gaza Strip) and Jerusalem (a city that straddles the border between the West Bank and Israel). Arafat did not call for a Palestinian state in Israel itself, which was seen as an important shift in PLO objectives. In November 1988 the PLO's assembly, the Palestine National Council, officially recognized the sovereignty of Israel, and the following month Arafat renounced the use of terrorism, in keeping with U.S. demands. The United States and the PLO could thus begin direct “diplomatic dialogue,” the first step toward a negotiated settlement with Israel and the first step toward Palestinian self-rule. In the meantime, the intifada had intensified. On the one hand, this created pressure for Israel to negotiate with the PLO. On the other, the clear demonstration of Palestinian unrest gave several fundamentalist Islamic groups, such as Hamas and Islamic Jihad, a powerful position from which to accuse Arafat of making too many concessions.

    In early 1991 the PLO's relations with the United States and pro-Western Arab states deteriorated when Arafat publicly supported Iraq during the Persian Gulf War. When a U.S.-led international coalition defeated Iraq, the PLO lost some of its bargaining power. Arab states in the Persian Gulf region withdrew financial support for the PLO and deported many Palestinians as punishment for Arafat's support of Iraq, causing severe financial difficulties for thousands of individual Palestinians and the PLO. In July 1991 the PLO's negotiating position was further weakened when the Lebanese army, backed by Syria, forced the PLO to abandon its strongholds in southern Lebanon near Israel's border. Secret negotiations between the PLO and Israel began in late 1992 following an Arab-Israeli peace conference in Madrid, Spain, in 1991 and during further talks in Washington, D.C. In January 1993 Israel, in a major policy shift of its own, repealed its ban on official contact with the PLO.

    Several months later Arafat and Israeli prime minister Yitzhak Rabin concluded a surprise accord. Signed in Washington, D.C., in September 1993, this accord, known as the Declaration of Principles, opened the way for limited Palestinian self-government in the Gaza Strip and the West Bank town of Jericho. The declaration also established the interim Palestinian National Authority, headed by Arafat and staffed with many PLO members, to administer self-rule. Many Palestinian nationalists objected to the PLO's recognition of and negotiations with Israel. In November 1994 the police force of the PNA clashed with and killed at least 12 Muslim fundamentalists who were protesting further talks with Israel. Fundamentalists responded with several terrorist actions against Israel over the next several months, to which Arafat responded by arresting numerous suspected terrorists.

    In September 1995 the PLO signed a second agreement with Israel extending Palestinian self-rule to almost all Palestinian towns and cities in the West Bank. The agreement also provided for the PA's first elections, which were held in January 1996. Arafat was elected president by a wide margin; Hamas and other fundamentalist groups boycotted the elections. In April 1996 Arafat led the Palestine National Council in voting to abolish the sections of the PLO's charter calling for Israel's destruction. However, removal of these sections was delayed after peace negotiations stalled following Benjamin Netanyahu's election as Israel's prime minister in May. Netanyahu's call for fewer compromises with the Palestinians—as well as continued Palestinian terrorist attacks, and tensions surrounding continued Jewish settlements in the Occupied Territories—caused a drastic slowdown in negotiations over implementation of the Declaration of Principles and its subsequent agreements.

    In July 1998 the UN, over the objections of Israel and the United States, voted by a wide margin to upgrade the status of the Palestinian delegation, known officially as Palestine since 1988. Seen largely as a symbolic step toward statehood, the new status allows the Palestinians to participate in UN General Assembly debate and to cosponsor draft resolutions on Middle East issues. In December, as part of an accord providing for further Israeli withdrawals from the West Bank in return for Palestinian security guarantees, the Palestinian National Council removed from its charter the sections calling for Israel's destruction. Nevertheless, that same month Israel froze the implementation of the accord, claiming that the Palestinians had not met other conditions of the accord.

    Epiphany, you gave some informative works there but you made a statement that is incorrect. The whole premise of this battle is not just over land but over land promised in part to religious beliefs. Therefore, religious differences was the root of the problem. The land that was intially discussed was land promised to the Children of Israel in the Old Testament. This had been an ongoing battle for centuries but it was not until the statehood of israel was established that it became more of a political struggle. The problem today is simple. The United Nations was in support of making Palestin ad statehood which would remove the Israeli's from the land they considered promised the them. The U.S. was very careful in it's approach to this situation for it doesn't want to confuse the people surrounding it. But since 9/11/01, President Bush has admitted that he was in support of Palestine reciveing statehood. This has caused a rift in the political process...
     
  6. dnommo

    dnommo Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    more information

    Land was and still is the core of the Arab-Israeli conflict in Palestine. Even prior to the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, the Zionist movement invested intensive efforts to obtain land from its Arab owners. The Jewish National Fund (Keren Kayemeth le-Yisrael), for example, was established with the sole aim and role of buying land from the Arabs. Yet, in spite of these efforts, only a small percentage of land passed into Jewish lands, mostly by Arabs who at the time lived in neighboring Arab countries, such as Lebanon and others.

    When the UN General Assembly passed Resolution 181 of November 29, 1947, calling for the partition of Palestine, only 7 percent of the land was in Jewish hands; Palestinians owned the remaining 93 percent. In the wake of the Arab defeat in the 1948 war, the State of Israel was established on 78 percent of the total area of the land of Palestine, leaving the west bank of the River Jordan together with the Gaza Strip to Jordan and Egypt,
    respectively.

    Immediately after the end of the 1948 war, Israel's campaign for the acquisition of Palestinian land took new shape. Instead of buying the land from its Palestinian owners, the newly created Jewish state passed laws which would enable it to obtain land through "legal" means. Accordingly, the 1948 Land Law was passed, which stipulated that any land not in active cultivation for three years, was considered "neglected" (matruk) and, upon the authority of the Ministry of Agriculture, its ownership was passed on to another party. This procedure was made possible through a unique cooperation between the Ministry of Agriculture and the Israeli Military Administration. The Palestinians who had not fled or had not been expelled during the 1948 war, but remained on their land within the Israeli state, were placed under administrative detention by the Israeli Military Administration. They were denied freedom of movement and were thus kept from cultivating their lands. These lands would later be declared "neglected" by the Ministry of Agriculture and would pass into Jewish ownership.

    When the UN General Assembly passed Resolution 181 of November 29, 1947, calling for the partition of Palestine, only seven percent of the land was in Jewish hands

    In 1950, Israel passed the Law of Absentee Property, which enabled it to expropriate millions of dunums (four dunums equal one acre) of Palestinian land and to pass them to the control of the Minhal Mekarkaei Yisrael (The Israel Lands Authority). Part of these lands belonged to Palestinians who had fled the country and had become refugees, but part also belonged to those who had remained in what became the State of Israel, but were moved by the Israeli authorities from their villages of origin and concentrated into other ones, where they would be under the tight control of the Israeli Military Administration. This earned them the status of "absentees"!

    Subsequently, the Development Authority was founded in 1951. It had for role the exploitation of the lands of absentees, and was given the authority to transfer these lands to Keren Kayemeth or the State of Israel--- but never to non-Jews. Indeed, to this day, Keren Kayemeth, the Israel Lands Authority, Amidar, and other bodies dealing with land go by one rule: no land can be transferred to non-Jews.

    Unequal Shares

    Today, the total area of the State of Israel is approximately 20 million dunums. Of this, 92 percent is totally closed to non-Jews. Furthermore, the Palestinian Arabs who remained in what became the State of Israel constituted 18 percent of the population and owned 25 percent of the land at the time of the establishment of the state. Today, they still make up 18 percent of the population--- because the natural population growth among them is balanced by Jewish immigration into the country--- but they hardly own 4 percent of the land. Accordingly, the share of every Jewish citizen within the State of Israel is 4.2 dunums, while that of Palestinians is 0.7 percent of a dunum per person.

    Following its occupation of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip in 1967, Israel used similar methods and tactics to expropriate Palestinian land and to transfer it to Jewish ownership. In the occupied territories, however, Israel does not enjoy the status of a state. It is an occupying power and has no right to claim unto itself the ownership of what is considered "state land." Legally, these lands belong either to Jordan, which was the ruling state there prior to 1967, or to the Palestinian people and the future State of Palestine.

    This, however, has not ended the conflict over land and, clearly, has not stopped the Israeli authorities from grabbing more and more of it. They are proceeding with the expansion of existing Jewish settlements on Palestinian land, and with the extension of their fences to include additional land. Bulldozers work day and night to change the topography of the land and to create new facts on the ground. Zoning plans are drawn periodically, and fraudulent deals are still carried out for the buying of Palestinian property. All this raises a major question: What is the use of obtaining more and more land here and there? How can this Israeli policy be viewed as compatible with all the efforts that are being exerted for the achievement of peace between Israelis and Palestinians? Where does the problem between the two peoples really reside? Is it in who will have more land or who will feel more victimized? Or does it rather lie in how to realize justice for both peoples and to convince them that there is yet a chance for them to live in peace side by side?

    One also questions the absence of equal justice for both peoples. What legal or moral grounds, for example, give a Jew, any Jew from any part of the world, the right to settle and live in occupied Palestinian land, while Palestinians are denied reciprocity, including the right to live even in Arab East Jerusalem? In fact, Israel considers the Palestinian population in East Jerusalem as foreigners who need residence permits to live in their own hometown. These can be arbitrarily revoked, leading to the expulsion of their holders from their city.


    Burning Questions


    These questions and many others are constantly raised and engender fear and bitterness among the Palestinian population. It is becoming increasingly obvious to them that they are being faced with a racist regime whose aim is to uproot them from their land and to replace them with Jews. The experience of the Arab Bedouins, who in 1950 were expelled from their own lands in the Negev and relocated to another spot in the occupied territories, is a striking evidence of this policy.

    Today, the total area of the State of Israel is approximately 20 million dunums. Of this, 92 percent is totally closed to non-Jews

    The Israeli people must come to terms with the fact that, on this land, another people is entitled to the same rights. The expropriation of more Palestinian land and the settling of Jews deep in the heart of the occupied territories will only complicate the situation by making impossible any geographical separation between Israel as a Jewish state (with a Jewish majority), and Palestine as a non-Jewish majority.

    The current policy of the Israeli government will, in the long run,
    lead to a situation whereby, in the occupied territories, a majority of Palestinians will be ruled by a minority of Jews. This cannot be viable. It will be replaced by a binational state--- but only after a protracted, painful and bloody struggle, causing great suffering on both sides.


    The time has come to pause and question: Why all this suffering? Should not human lives be more valued than "one dunum here and one dunum there"? Unfortunately, this is becoming increasingly difficult with the wave of right-wing Jewish fundamentalism poisoning hearts and minds and undermining the forces of peace and moderation. Only a shock can bring people to their senses. Or a firm international stand.


    need any more let me know....
     
  7. epiphany

    epiphany Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    My dear Mr Dnommo.......

    I appreciate your added infomation,
    it was very informative also, I see you
    went more in depth.....good for you.....
    you are soooooo wise...
    However, anyone who wants to go deeper
    and check for themselves can go to the
    link that was provided at the bottom
    of the page.
    No thank you, for your assistance I am
    a very intelligent woman quite capable
    of researching my own information
    and typing what I see with my own eyes.

    You jump in anytime and help with your
    research perhaps, sometimes you can
    add pertinent information we all can use.....
    Good for you....you go!

    I ain't mad at ya........


    epiphany :heart:
     
  8. dnommo

    dnommo Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    while i thank you for your permission to post i was answering the question Ra asked. I did mention a statement you made simply for factual understanding. The rest of the post was pertaining to Ra's question. I would normally ask for forgiveness of onbe who may take my comments personally but at this point i shall not for the information was not addressed to you. If you find my comments threatening to you, might i suggest you be a little thicker in skin before assuming someone is attempting to make you look unintelligent. This was Amun-Ra's question not your so let's be mature and deal wiht the question. I have posted here long before you decided to interject do before you start being condonscending about your comments, leave thme for your own "self=proclaimed pity-party". Your information was not the only information posted and what i enetered was not done to donwgrade yours, but anyone who know has read me would know that if i meant it for you i would have simply stated it. I mentioned your comment but quickly moved away from it.

    For the record, if you assume that i think you are unintelligent then that is your own closed minded concept but if this is how i felt then trust me i would definitely mention it.

    Let's keep the sarcasm for the ladies room and not a forum that doesn't deal wiht such an issue. If you have an issue with me feel free to email me so that i may sit back, read and laugh it all the way to the delete pile...

    Too sensitive for no reason...wipe your sleeve...it's crying...
     
  9. epiphany

    epiphany Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Mr. Dnommo.......

    Did it hurt....did it hurt........


    epiphany :heart:
     
  10. dnommo

    dnommo Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    not at all but i would ask you the same question...

    such sarcasm...i would never expect it from a lady...

    tag you're it...
     
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