Pan-Africanism : Father of Pan-Africanism; Kwame Nkhrumah

abdurratln

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
I do not see is as an "either-or". I think boths are fathers of Pan-Africanism in different senses of the word. Actually, it was not Blyden who invented the theory. I think Sylvestor-Williams deserves more credit for coining the word and developing the concept. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sylvester-Williams) Blyden took took more of a racial approach which inspires parallel theories that actually contradict Pan-Africanism. I have long believed that Pan-Africanism is more about geo-politics than it is about race or even culture. In fact, culture-based theories often lead away from Pan-Africanism rather than to it.

In the case of Blyden, I think he is a spolier used by the opponents of Pan-Africaanism much the way that Uncle Julius Nyerre is used against Pan-Africanism.

"According to historian, Hollis R. Lynch: "In 1845 a new and important influence came into Blyden's life when the Reverend John P. Knox, a white American, went to St. Thomas for reasons of health, and assumed the pastorship of the St. Thomas Protestant Dutch Reformed Church."[3] Blyden and his family lived near the church and Knox was impressed with the studious and pious boy of pious parents and became his mentor, encouraging his considerable aptitude for oratory and literature. Mainly because of his close association with the able and kindly Knox, Edward Wilmot Blyden decided to become a clergyman..." (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Wilmot_Blyden) So far, that does not seem like Pan-Africanism. It is anything but....

"Blyden supported the creation of a Jewish State in Israel and praised Theodore Herzl as the creator of "that marvelous movement called Zionism." (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Wilmot_Blyden). zionism is absolutely anthitheical to Pan-Africanism becuase it intejects a blocking entity between Africa and Arabia. This is the main pitfall of racism as opposed to geo-politcs.

Sylvestor-Williams, ont eh other hand, "formed the African Association which was to challenge paternalism, racism and imperialism. He stated that "the time has come when the voice of Black men should be heard independently in their own affairs". (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sylvester-Williams) So, while Blyden fell into the racism trap, Sylvestor-Williams fought racism from day one.

"When he formed the African Association, as it was first called, one of its aims was to "promote and protect the interests of all subjects claiming African descent, wholly or in part, in British colonies and other places especially Africa, by circulating accurate information on all subjects affecting their rights and privileges as subjects of the British Empire, by direct appeals to the Imperial and local Governments." (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sylvester-Williams) So, Sylvestor-Williams opposes British imperialism from day one, whereas Blyden supported the British creation of the zionist monstrosity called israel.

"...he loved, married and had children with a white English woman." Here we see more proof that he was not a racist, yet an African nationalist. Although he married a "white woman" he did not mazrry the white supramcy system and that is what matters most: "An interesting point is that in January 1890 Williams became a founding member of the Trinidad Elementary Teachers Union. The feature address was given by Chief Justice Sir John Gorrie, was in favour of reform in government and was constantly at odds with the white ruling class."

Instead of being mentored by "white preachers" he was influenced by African leaders. "Even at that time, there was in Trinidad an highly-educated, articulate (African) men, among them John Jacob Thomas, Maresse Smith, Mzumbo Lazare, C E Petioni, the Reverend Phillip Henry Douglin. Thomas particularly was famous for his book Froudacity (1889) in which he refuted and questioned the view espoused by Oxford historian James Anthony Froude that black people could not be entrusted with self-government. Thomas's ideas certainly inspired Williams. (Note that I had to edit out the racism to avoid confusing matters.) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sylvester-Williams)

In South Africa, it is likely that he was influenced by Gandhi. "He practised (law) around the same time as Mahatma Gandhi practiced as a lawyer. He wrote to newspapers and journals on matters touching on Pan-African interests and lectured publicly on related topics--a series of activities which led to his organising the first Pan-African Conference in 1900 and becoming its first General Secretary." (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sylvester-Williams)

"Williams' good friend, Trinidad attorney Muzumbo Lazare, who at the time was in London taking part in Queen Victoria's 60th anniversary celebrations as an officer of Trinidad Light Infantry Volunteers also met Kinloch and was appalled at the horrible treatment the Africans were receiving. (Williams' good friend, Trinidad attorney Muzumbo Lazare, who at the time was in London taking part in Queen Victoria's 60th anniversary celebrations as an officer of Trinidad Light Infantry Volunteers also met Kinloch and was appalled at the horrible treatment the Africans were receiving. (Williams' good friend, Trinidad attorney Muzumbo Lazare, who at the time was in London taking part in Queen Victoria's 60th anniversary celebrations as an officer of Trinidad Light Infantry Volunteers also met Kinloch and was appalled at the horrible treatment the Africans were receiving.)

"Williams did not make it to Parliament but was elected to the Marylebone Borough Council in 1906. However, service as a councillor did not take him away from his interest in and devotion to Africa. He became involved with Liberian affairs and went there in 1908 at the invitation of President Barclay. He died on March 26, 1911, at the age of forty-two." (Williams' good friend, Trinidad attorney Muzumbo Lazare, who at the time was in London taking part in Queen Victoria's 60th anniversary celebrations as an officer of Trinidad Light Infantry Volunteers also met Kinloch and was appalled at the horrible treatment the Africans were receiving.)

Be careful what you ask for. You just might get it.
 

abdurratln

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Edward Wilmot Blyden

http://www.blackpast.org/?q=gah/edward-wilmot-blyden-1832-1912

I do not see this as an "either-or". I think boths are fathers of Pan-Africanism in different senses of the word. Actually, it was not Blyden who invented the theory. I think Sylvestor-Williams deserves more credit for coining the word and developing the concept. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sylvester-Williams) Blyden took took more of a racial approach which inspires parallel theories that actually contradict Pan-Africanism. I have long believed that Pan-Africanism is more about geo-politics than it is about race or even culture. In fact, culture-based theories often lead away from Pan-Africanism rather than to it.

In the case of Blyden, I think he is a spolier used by the opponents of Pan-Africaanism much the way that Uncle Julius Nyerre is used against Pan-Africanism.

"According to historian, Hollis R. Lynch: "In 1845 a new and important influence came into Blyden's life when the Reverend John P. Knox, a white American, went to St. Thomas for reasons of health, and assumed the pastorship of the St. Thomas Protestant Dutch Reformed Church."[3] Blyden and his family lived near the church and Knox was impressed with the studious and pious boy of pious parents and became his mentor, encouraging his considerable aptitude for oratory and literature. Mainly because of his close association with the able and kindly Knox, Edward Wilmot Blyden decided to become a clergyman..." (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Wilmot_Blyden) So far, that does not seem like Pan-Africanism. It is anything but....

"Blyden supported the creation of a Jewish State in Israel and praised Theodore Herzl as the creator of "that marvelous movement called Zionism." (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Wilmot_Blyden). zionism is absolutely antitheical to Pan-Africanism becuase it intejects a blocking entity between Africa and Arabia. This is the main pitfall of racism as opposed to geo-politcs.

Sylvestor-Williams, on the other hand, "formed the African Association which was to challenge paternalism, racism and imperialism. He stated that "the time has come when the voice of Black men should be heard independently in their own affairs". (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sylvester-Williams) So, while Blyden fell into the racism trap, Sylvestor-Williams fought racism from day one.

"When he formed the African Association, as it was first called, one of its aims was to "promote and protect the interests of all subjects claiming African descent, wholly or in part, in British colonies and other places especially Africa, by circulating accurate information on all subjects affecting their rights and privileges as subjects of the British Empire, by direct appeals to the Imperial and local Governments." (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sylvester-Williams) So, Sylvestor-Williams opposes British imperialism from day one, whereas Blyden supported the British creation of the zionist monstrosity called israel.

"...he loved, married and had children with a white English woman." Here we see more proof that he was not a racist, yet an African nationalist. Although he married a "white woman" he did not mazrry the white supramcy system and that is what matters most: "An interesting point is that in January 1890 Williams became a founding member of the Trinidad Elementary Teachers Union. The feature address was given by Chief Justice Sir John Gorrie, was in favour of reform in government and was constantly at odds with the white ruling class."

Instead of being mentored by "white preachers" he was influenced by African leaders. "Even at that time, there was in Trinidad an highly-educated, articulate (African) men, among them John Jacob Thomas, Maresse Smith, Mzumbo Lazare, C E Petioni, the Reverend Phillip Henry Douglin. Thomas particularly was famous for his book Froudacity (1889) in which he refuted and questioned the view espoused by Oxford historian James Anthony Froude that black people could not be entrusted with self-government. Thomas's ideas certainly inspired Williams. (Note that I had to edit out the racism to avoid confusing matters.) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sylvester-Williams)

In South Africa, it is likely that he was influenced by Gandhi. "He practised (law) around the same time as Mahatma Gandhi practiced as a lawyer. He wrote to newspapers and journals on matters touching on Pan-African interests and lectured publicly on related topics--a series of activities which led to his organising the first Pan-African Conference in 1900 and becoming its first General Secretary." (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sylvester-Williams)

"Williams' good friend, Trinidad attorney Muzumbo Lazare, who at the time was in London taking part in Queen Victoria's 60th anniversary celebrations as an officer of Trinidad Light Infantry Volunteers also met Kinloch and was appalled at the horrible treatment the Africans were receiving. (Williams' good friend, Trinidad attorney Muzumbo Lazare, who at the time was in London taking part in Queen Victoria's 60th anniversary celebrations as an officer of Trinidad Light Infantry Volunteers also met Kinloch and was appalled at the horrible treatment the Africans were receiving. (Williams' good friend, Trinidad attorney Muzumbo Lazare, who at the time was in London taking part in Queen Victoria's 60th anniversary celebrations as an officer of Trinidad Light Infantry Volunteers also met Kinloch and was appalled at the horrible treatment the Africans were receiving.)

"Williams did not make it to Parliament but was elected to the Marylebone Borough Council in 1906. However, service as a councillor did not take him away from his interest in and devotion to Africa. He became involved with Liberian affairs and went there in 1908 at the invitation of President Barclay. He died on March 26, 1911, at the age of forty-two." (Williams' good friend, Trinidad attorney Muzumbo Lazare, who at the time was in London taking part in Queen Victoria's 60th anniversary celebrations as an officer of Trinidad Light Infantry Volunteers also met Kinloch and was appalled at the horrible treatment the Africans were receiving.)

Be careful what you ask for. You just might get it.
 

Omowale Jabali

The Cosmic Journeyman
MEMBER
I do not see is as an "either-or". I think boths are fathers of Pan-Africanism in different senses of the word. Actually, it was not Blyden who invented the theory. I think Sylvestor-Williams deserves more credit for coining the word and developing the concept. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sylvester-Williams) Blyden took took more of a racial approach which inspires parallel theories that actually contradict Pan-Africanism. I have long believed that Pan-Africanism is more about geo-politics than it is about race or even culture. In fact, culture-based theories often lead away from Pan-Africanism rather than to it.

In the case of Blyden, I think he is a spolier used by the opponents of Pan-Africaanism much the way that Uncle Julius Nyerre is used against Pan-Africanism.

"According to historian, Hollis R. Lynch: "In 1845 a new and important influence came into Blyden's life when the Reverend John P. Knox, a white American, went to St. Thomas for reasons of health, and assumed the pastorship of the St. Thomas Protestant Dutch Reformed Church."[3] Blyden and his family lived near the church and Knox was impressed with the studious and pious boy of pious parents and became his mentor, encouraging his considerable aptitude for oratory and literature. Mainly because of his close association with the able and kindly Knox, Edward Wilmot Blyden decided to become a clergyman..." (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Wilmot_Blyden) So far, that does not seem like Pan-Africanism. It is anything but....

"Blyden supported the creation of a Jewish State in Israel and praised Theodore Herzl as the creator of "that marvelous movement called Zionism." (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Wilmot_Blyden). zionism is absolutely anthitheical to Pan-Africanism becuase it intejects a blocking entity between Africa and Arabia. This is the main pitfall of racism as opposed to geo-politcs.

Sylvestor-Williams, ont eh other hand, "formed the African Association which was to challenge paternalism, racism and imperialism. He stated that "the time has come when the voice of Black men should be heard independently in their own affairs". (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sylvester-Williams) So, while Blyden fell into the racism trap, Sylvestor-Williams fought racism from day one.

"When he formed the African Association, as it was first called, one of its aims was to "promote and protect the interests of all subjects claiming African descent, wholly or in part, in British colonies and other places especially Africa, by circulating accurate information on all subjects affecting their rights and privileges as subjects of the British Empire, by direct appeals to the Imperial and local Governments." (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sylvester-Williams) So, Sylvestor-Williams opposes British imperialism from day one, whereas Blyden supported the British creation of the zionist monstrosity called israel.

"...he loved, married and had children with a white English woman." Here we see more proof that he was not a racist, yet an African nationalist. Although he married a "white woman" he did not mazrry the white supramcy system and that is what matters most: "An interesting point is that in January 1890 Williams became a founding member of the Trinidad Elementary Teachers Union. The feature address was given by Chief Justice Sir John Gorrie, was in favour of reform in government and was constantly at odds with the white ruling class."

Instead of being mentored by "white preachers" he was influenced by African leaders. "Even at that time, there was in Trinidad an highly-educated, articulate (African) men, among them John Jacob Thomas, Maresse Smith, Mzumbo Lazare, C E Petioni, the Reverend Phillip Henry Douglin. Thomas particularly was famous for his book Froudacity (1889) in which he refuted and questioned the view espoused by Oxford historian James Anthony Froude that black people could not be entrusted with self-government. Thomas's ideas certainly inspired Williams. (Note that I had to edit out the racism to avoid confusing matters.) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sylvester-Williams)

In South Africa, it is likely that he was influenced by Gandhi. "He practised (law) around the same time as Mahatma Gandhi practiced as a lawyer. He wrote to newspapers and journals on matters touching on Pan-African interests and lectured publicly on related topics--a series of activities which led to his organising the first Pan-African Conference in 1900 and becoming its first General Secretary." (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sylvester-Williams)

"Williams' good friend, Trinidad attorney Muzumbo Lazare, who at the time was in London taking part in Queen Victoria's 60th anniversary celebrations as an officer of Trinidad Light Infantry Volunteers also met Kinloch and was appalled at the horrible treatment the Africans were receiving. (Williams' good friend, Trinidad attorney Muzumbo Lazare, who at the time was in London taking part in Queen Victoria's 60th anniversary celebrations as an officer of Trinidad Light Infantry Volunteers also met Kinloch and was appalled at the horrible treatment the Africans were receiving. (Williams' good friend, Trinidad attorney Muzumbo Lazare, who at the time was in London taking part in Queen Victoria's 60th anniversary celebrations as an officer of Trinidad Light Infantry Volunteers also met Kinloch and was appalled at the horrible treatment the Africans were receiving.)

"Williams did not make it to Parliament but was elected to the Marylebone Borough Council in 1906. However, service as a councillor did not take him away from his interest in and devotion to Africa. He became involved with Liberian affairs and went there in 1908 at the invitation of President Barclay. He died on March 26, 1911, at the age of forty-two." (Williams' good friend, Trinidad attorney Muzumbo Lazare, who at the time was in London taking part in Queen Victoria's 60th anniversary celebrations as an officer of Trinidad Light Infantry Volunteers also met Kinloch and was appalled at the horrible treatment the Africans were receiving.)

Be careful what you ask for. You just might get it.
I agree with the highlighted part of the statement above because zionism is not only racism but imperialism and a form of apartheid as well.
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
In the Spirit of Sankofa and Real Truth!

I am on dial-up

unable to get links,
but please explain your position and opinion



Ankhur,

Welcome back! Sorry about the dial-up situation, hopes it gets better. I don't really have a position or opinion; both men have been raised to that level, and perhaps there are more. Here is a snippet from the link:

"Edward Wilmot Blyden, widely known as the father of Pan-Africanism, was born on August 3, 1832 in Saint Thomas, in what are now the U.S Virgin Islands. Blyden was the third of seven children and was born to Romeo and Judith Blyden, a tailor and schoolteacher, respectively. The family lived in a predominantly Jewish and English speaking community, and attended church at the integrated Dutch Reformed Church. Blyden’s parents were free and literate at a time when most blacks on the islands were enslaved and illiterate. In 1842, the family moved to Porto Bello, Venezuela where Blyden first discovered his facility with languages. He also found that black free Venezuelans performed much the same menial labor as enslaved blacks in the Virgin Islands."



 

Clyde C Coger Jr

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
In the Spirit of Sankofa and Real Truth!

I do not see is as an "either-or". I think boths are fathers of Pan-Africanism in different senses of the word. Actually, it was not Blyden who invented the theory. I think Sylvestor-Williams deserves more credit for coining the word and developing the concept. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sylvester-Williams) Blyden took took more of a racial approach which inspires parallel theories that actually contradict Pan-Africanism. I have long believed that Pan-Africanism is more about geo-politics than it is about race or even culture. In fact, culture-based theories often lead away from Pan-Africanism rather than to it.

Be careful what you ask for. You just might get it.



abdurratln,

Neither do I, both men have been raised to that level, and perhaps there are more. Here is a snippet from the self-supporting link...showcasing Edward Wilmot Blyden, which status cannot be taken away, at least not by this Discussion Forum:


"Edward Wilmot Blyden, widely known as the father of Pan-Africanism, was born on August 3, 1832 in Saint Thomas, in what are now the U.S Virgin Islands. Blyden was the third of seven children and was born to Romeo and Judith Blyden, a tailor and schoolteacher, respectively. The family lived in a predominantly Jewish and English speaking community, and attended church at the integrated Dutch Reformed Church. Blyden’s parents were free and literate at a time when most blacks on the islands were enslaved and illiterate. In 1842, the family moved to Porto Bello, Venezuela where Blyden first discovered his facility with languages. He also found that black free Venezuelans performed much the same menial labor as enslaved blacks in the Virgin Islands."


 

Ankhur

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
I appreciate the input but

abdurratln,

Neither do I, both men have been raised to that level, and perhaps there are more. Here is a snippet from the self-supporting link...showcasing Edward Wilmot Blyden, which status cannot be taken away, at least not by this Discussion Forum:


"Edward Wilmot Blyden, widely known as the father of Pan-Africanism, was born on August 3, 1832 in Saint Thomas, in what are now the U.S Virgin Islands. Blyden was the third of seven children and was born to Romeo and Judith Blyden, a tailor and schoolteacher, respectively. The family lived in a predominantly Jewish and English speaking community, and attended church at the integrated Dutch Reformed Church. Blyden’s parents were free and literate at a time when most blacks on the islands were enslaved and illiterate. In 1842, the family moved to Porto Bello, Venezuela where Blyden first discovered his facility with languages. He also found that black free Venezuelans performed much the same menial labor as enslaved blacks in the Virgin Islands."


My concept of a father is the man who takes the idea and manifests it , or seminates and produces, and I could be presumptious but I think the members of the AU would , give some credit to Blyden but would give the title of father to Nkhrumah.

I'm not sure Blyden ever actually lived on the continent, or saw post colonial Africa and as said before long, before the raid on Entebbe the majority of revolutionaries were vehemently against Zionism, particularly due to it's involvement colonization, in South Africa, and in the Congo regarding diamond exploitation.
(Kwame Toure' speaking on world Zionism
Source URL http://video.google.com/videosearch?sourceid=ie7&q=wole soyinka&rls=com.microsoft:*:IE-SearchBox&oe=UTF-8&rlz=1I7GGLL_en&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wv#q=stokely+carmichael&hl=en&emb=0&start=10 )
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
In the Spirit of Sankofa and Real Truth!

I appreciate the input but ...Thank You


My concept of a father is the man who takes the idea and manifests it , or seminates and produces, and I could be presumptious but I think the members of the AU would , give some credit to Blyden but would give the title of father to Nkhrumah.

I'm not sure Blyden ever actually lived on the continent, or saw post colonial Africa and as said before long, before the raid on Entebbe the majority of revolutionaries were vehemently against Zionism, particularly due to it's involvement colonization, in South Africa, and in the Congo regarding diamond exploitation.
(Kwame Toure' speaking on world Zionism
Source URL http://video.google.com/videosearch?sourceid=ie7&q=wole soyinka&rls=com.microsoft:*:IE-SearchBox&oe=UTF-8&rlz=1I7GGLL_en&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wv#q=stokely+carmichael&hl=en&emb=0&start=10 )



Ankhur,

In my view, the title...Father of Pan-Africanism...is not in dispute, just being shared, based on the record. As previously stated, I have no dog in this hunt and respect both Brothers equally.


 
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