Black People : FARRAKHAN Hands Over The Reins...?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by SAMURAI36, Oct 6, 2006.

  1. SAMURAI36

    SAMURAI36 Banned MEMBER

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    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/...00.story?coll=chi-news-hed&ctrack=1&cset=true

    Nation of Islam leader calls illness 'serious'

    By Margaret Ramirez
    Tribune religion writer
    Published September 22, 2006, 9:52 PM CDT


    Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan released a letter Friday urging the organization's executive board to solve the group's problems without him while he is being treated for "serious infection and inflammation."

    In a letter dated Sept. 11 and published in the current edition of the Nation of Islam's newspaper, The Final Call, Farrakhan said he has been in pain since earlier this year and has symptoms similar to those he experienced during his 1998 battle with prostate cancer.

    Nation of Islam officials did not return calls for comment. But some religious leaders and others familiar with the organization said they don't think the announcement signals that he is about to step down from leadership of the group after almost 30 years.

    "I will be available to give guidance in any major situation that may arise, but I would prefer that the Executive Board of the Nation of Islam help to solve the problems of the Nation, without asking me," Farrakhan wrote.

    Farrakhan, 73, was treated by his doctors at Howard University Hospital in Washington, D.C., and is now recuperating at his home in Michigan. On a trip to Cuba in March, Farrakhan visited doctors who discovered an ulcer in the anal area.

    He describes his illness in the letter as a test for himself and the organization.

    "In this period of testing, you can prove to the world that the Nation of Islam is more than the charisma, eloquence and personality of Louis Farrakhan," he wrote, "... and that it will live long after I and we have gone."

    Islamic expert Aminah McCloud, a religious studies professor at DePaul University who has studied the Nation of Islam, said the tone of the letter was similar to his correspondence when his cancer brought him close to death.

    "When he was put in the hospital and diagnosed, his communication to the community was equally somber and serious," she said. "The direction of the Nation is one of moving forward and I assume that is what they will do. By moving forward, I mean that they are avid students of Islam without any cultural overlays and they still have at the core of their movement, a focus on bettering the black community."

    Muslim leaders like Imam Gha-is Askia expressed concern. Askia said religious leaders have been invited to an upcoming prayer vigil at Farrakhan's Michigan residence.

    But Askia said he was not alarmed that Farrakhan had handed over the reins during his recovery and did not see it as a step toward succession. "When you're going to be sick for a while, the show goes on," Askia said.

    Farrakhan was born May 11, 1933, in the Bronx, New York, only three years after the start of the religious movement he would eventually lead.

    The Nation of Islam was founded in 1930 by Wallace D. Fard, an Arab man who preached in Detroit about the link between black nationalism and the Islamic faith. His most dedicated student, Elijah Muhammad, assumed leadership of the movement in 1934, taking it to national prominence. In 1955, Farrakhan joined the Nation of Islam.

    When Muhammad died in 1975, he was succeeded by his son, W.D. Mohammed, who moved away from black nationalism toward traditional Islam. Farrakhan separated from the group in September 1977 and announced that he was re-creating the Nation of Islam based on the original teachings of Elijah Muhammad.
     
  2. spicybrown

    spicybrown Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Hmmm... I wonder who will be Farrakhan's successor.
     
  3. King Tubbs

    King Tubbs Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    An excerpt from Xyborg's site I tend to agree with almost 100%

    The Deluge?

    Minister Louis Farrakhan’s paranoid and conspiratorial cast of mind was strikingly expressed in the closing words of his recent September 11th letter where he admonished his followers to be “ever watchful for any smart, crooked deceiver and hypocrite who would create confusion over my present condition”. This at a time when the Nation of Islam (NOI) is in dire need of fresh and radical new ideas for its post-Farrakhan future. It represents precisely the sort of retarding mentality that saps the motivation and discourages the NOI’s best and brightest from stepping forward with ground-breaking proposals for the organisation’s future. How on Earth are they to ever meet the NOI leader’s own challenge that they prove to the world that their movement is “more than the charisma, eloquence and personality of Louis Farrakhan” if any display of initiative and imagination on their part places them at risk of being accused of steering the NOI in a Wallace Muhammad-like “new direction” and, by inference, serving an anti-Elijah/COINTELPRO-type “agent” agenda aimed at the NOI’s destruction? What is particularly tragic is that this regressive tone is being set by the ailing leader himself.

    Whatever Farrakhan may say, it will be the Black people he leaves behind who will have to pick up the pieces in the wake of his imminent demise and they must begin to think outside of their epistemological boxes in order to reinvent the NOI for the 21st century. This organisation - and the Black world it continues to inspire - cannot endure as a Farrakhanite personality cult built solely around a charismatic charmer with precious little institutional substance - even though such a hypnotic leader-figure will forever remain absolutely indispensable to the NOI as the principal electromagnetic driver through which to attract, excite and engage the imaginations of our people.

    During his 15 October 2005 ‘Millions More Movement’ Jeremiad in Washington DC, Farrakhan called for the establishment of a network of ministries as part of his goal of transforming Black America into something resembling an actual nation-state. Conspicuously absent from this and other similar nation-building exhortations he has made in the past was the establishment of an NOI congressional, senatorial or parliamentary process through which he and his cohorts could be held accountable by the very people they purport to lead.

    In its entire history the NOI has never held anything like a “National Congress” at which NOI delegates could gather from all over America and the world and address, in the most direct and forceful terms, the internal failings of their own organisation and hold to account the corrupt ministers and other functionaries and bureaucrats who bear responsibility for such failures. Farrakhan rattled off a seemingly endless series of quasi-governmental bodies that he would like to see come into being but adroitly sidestepped the creation of any type of representative electoral and legislative organ through which he and the NOI’s leadership cadre could be held answerable if this were ever required.

    Even the African, Asian, Arab and Latin American dictatorships with which he has long been associated (like those in Libya, Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Saddam’s Iraq and elsewhere) have long practiced a far greater degree of regime accountability than has ever existed in the NOI. It is this singular failure to create within itself any mechanism of checks and balances which accounts for the NOI’s inability to translate its considerable organisational energy and charismatic allure into a fiscally-sound and institutionally self-sustaining global power.

    This must be the first reform the organisation enacts in the event of Farrakhan’s passing. The NOI should hold its first ever National and International Congress which, unlike the annual 'Saviours Day' conventions that are devoted to little more than leader cult-worship, will resemble the United Kingdom’s recently-concluded Labour Party conference during which the rank-and-file were able to have a real voice and a direct impact on the running of the party to which they belong. The pressures these delegates brought to bear forced the Labour Party leader (and British Prime Minister) Tony Blair’s decision to step down at the next general election and was a powerful display of the kind of institutional democracy the NOI should begin to practice within its own fold.

    As things stand, Farrakhan is the sole person empowered to appoint and remove the various local, regional and national ministers in the NOI - a plainly unsatisfactory state of affairs as evidenced by the various NOI-related online chat-rooms in which the level of disaffection amongst the organisation’s “Believers” is palpable but can never be openly expressed lest it be branded “hypocrisy” - with all of the murderous consequences which can ensue.

    Fidel Castro, with whom Farrakhan parallels his own plight, moved swiftly to broadcast photos and video of himself in his hospital bed meeting with Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez and other dignitaries when rumours began to swirl about the exact state of the Cuban generalissimo’s health. Even the elusive leaders of Al Qaeda and Hezbollah have proven much more agile and media savvy than the lethargic NOI when the urgent need arose to release information and imagery to counter American disinformation concerning their whereabouts and ultimate fate. The NOI needs to upgrade its phlegmatic and amateurish PR operation when it comes to the regular and rapid release of information relating to Farrakhan’s condition and his organisation’s activities. The movement should immediately upload to Google Video, You Tube and its own website the most up-to-date still and video imagery of Farrakhan’s current condition if people are to be kept from assuming that the NOI leader has already expired.

    Indeed, it wasn’t until ‘The Afristocrat’ posted Farrakhan’s letter on September 21st that the NOI moved to post the same document on its own website the following day even though the letter had already appeared at least a week earlier in the organisation’s newspaper, The Final Call. Why a letter dealing with so grave a matter was not immediately published to the worldwide web on the very day on which it is dated (September 11th) - and coupled with a comprehensive press briefing detailing the full extent of Farrakhan’s infirmity along with his movement’s plans going forward - is a mystery and just so typical of the paranoid secrecy and institutional anaemia the NOI desperately needs to cast off in the post-Farrakhan era.

    Concerning the NOI’s future leadership: Each time the health of the movement’s head becomes a news story a number of names are quickly touted as possible heirs to the throne in the event of Farrakhan’s demise. Most of them are ageing Farrakhan stalwarts who have always struck me as eminently unqualified to fill the NOI leader’s alligator-skin shoes.

    His chief-of-staff Leonard Farrakhan Muhammad (LFM) is one name that often crops up. I met LFM briefly in Los Angeles in February 2002 during the making of a British television documentary on the NOI movement, sized him up and was left distinctly underwhelmed. He carries himself with a ponderous conceit, is waaaaay too heavy at the mid-section and, quite frankly, reeks of NOI corruption. I’ve never considered him to be a serious contender where the succession of Farrakhan is concerned, owing largely to his age. More than likely, in the event of the NOI leader’s departure, LFM will take the proverbial money and run. Farrakhan’s Ghana-based international representative Akbar Muhammad (AKM), through whom I arranged my February 1998 Dubai interview with the NOI leader, seems like a decent-enough, cerebral chap (and is apparently engaged in the drafting of Farrakhan’s official autobiography which, like the 'Autobiography of Malcolm X', is sure to be a landmark event in American literary history) but appears to lack the fire and charisma the NOI will require to continue to surge itself onwards and upwards.

    Farrakhan’s assistant minister Ishmael Muhammad (ISM) is, like so many of the NOI leader’s gauleiters, an utterly uninspiring, robot-like automaton whose rigid mimicry of Farrakhan’s oratorical mannerisms and inflections is annoying to the point of distraction. This son of Elijah Muhammad (EJM) probably feels “entitled” to Farrakhan’s seat and may eventually evolve into an able leader in his own right but is nowhere close to it at this point. Neither is Farrakhan’s biological son (and NOI Supreme Captain) Mustapha Farrakhan (MST) who evidences no particularly noteworthy intellectual or organisational abilities, which is quite surprising given the close proximity he has maintained to his exceptional father’s every global move - a giftedness that doesn‘t appear to have rubbed off on MST.

    NOI health minister Dr. Alim Muhammad (ALM) is another equally bland and unremarkable technocrat as is the NOI’s New York Minister, Kevin Muhammad (KVM). The latter, KVM, has a quality about him that is eerily reminiscent of Temple No.7’s Malcolm-era thug-in-chief Captain Joseph/Yusuf Shah which would appear to further militate against his already poor succession prospects.

    The only person who ever came anything like a close second to Farrakhan was the late Dr. Khallid Muhammad (KLM) but he was always too crude and vulgar for my taste (though I did admire his militancy). Some of the NOI’s women are quite impressive personalities, most especially Minister Ava Muhammad (AVM) of Atlanta who has always struck me as Farrakhan’s most obvious interim/care-taker successor before a more permanent replacement emerges. The NOI also has a burgeoning international presence, most notably here in England which has long had a number of impressive London-based ministers like Michael Muhammad (MCL), Leo Muhammad (LHM) and Hilary Muhammad (HLM) - any of whom may eventually emerge as worthy contenders for Farrakhan’s throne.

    Even more important than who the NOI self-selects as Farrakhan’s institutional successor will be whether the wider Black world embraces that individual as the new standard bearer of global Black personhood and existential leadership. It is the Black world outside of the NOI that will ultimately coronate Farrakhan’s true and permanent heir - in the same way that they eventually picked Farrakhan over EJM’s designated 1975 successor, Wallace D. Muhammad.

    Never has the Black world been in greater need of a supernatural leader-figure who will go far past Farrakhan and actually deliver us to a world beyond our seemingly endless state of existential crisis. As Farrakhan nears his end one thing comes ever more crisply into view: He has, thus far, failed to realise the prediction which EJM made of him that “through you I will get ALL of my people”. Barring some unforeseen or “Wheel”-related cosmic occurrence, Farrakhan looks set to leave this world having falsified (rather than fulfilled) that particular prophecy.

    Farrakhan’s demise will nonetheless leave a gaping and painful hole at the heart of the Black world and severely destabilise the delicate existential balance between the races that his presence had long held in place. Whatever one may think of Farrakhan he did emerge to create and occupy a novel space on America’s ethno-political stage and did, however intangible it may seem, have a hugely empowering effect on the Black world through the way in which they found themselves able to mobilize on an unprecedented scale through him and present themselves with a spectacle of just what it was they were capable of achieving in response to his battle cry.

    There will always be a need for an individual or institution in the Black world that enjoys this level of trust and confidence and is a global repository of our collective personhood as well as being able to move us by our millions and point us in a particular direction (even though Farrakhan and his NOI have proven maddeningly frustrating in their abject failure to deliver in any substantive way once we actually got there). Whenever the Black world found itself confronted by a localised or global emergency like the Katrina cataclysm, the OJ Simpson verdict, the Rodney King affair (as well as the various recurring crises in Africa and other parts of the Black Diaspora) it was always comforting to know that we had a “911” of sorts in the person of Farrakhan who could always be relied upon to present our most forceful and uncompromising response to, and repudiation of, any encroachments upon our humanity and self-worth.

    Whatever strides forward we make in our development as a global people we must always have this “911” on permanent stand-by and will forever have Farrakhan to thank for his having stood up when he did and pointed us towards himself as the person on whom we could always depend in moments of such need. He never let us down because he, in turn, could always count on our unwavering support and readiness to go to war were he to ever be molested by the Black world’s existential enemy, the US Government and its Oval Office occupant.

    The strategic post-Farrakhan aim of the criminal regime in Washington DC will be to ensure that, in the event of his passing, no Black leader should ever again be permitted to emerge and assume the level of fearlessness, popularity and autonomy which Farrakhan displayed and enjoyed. For this reason the Black world must swiftly mobilize itself on a global scale to ensure that we translate the independence and power that Farrakhan symbolised into a concrete network of inviolable institutions and global alliances such that when he does pass on, either into retirement or the next world, his departure will constitute no “event” at all.

    As things presently stand the Black world hasn’t even begun to ready itself for the cataclysm of sorts that will be the departure of Farrakhan. No matter how blasé people may feign their response to his current plight, the passing of Farrakhan will be the landmark - and potentially catalysing - event of modern Black (as well as American) history. It could very well become “the New 9/11”. This development is going to be a much bigger ‘deal’ than people have fully prepared themselves for. No recent occurrence will have generated more public discussion than that which is set to ensue over the legacy and meaning of Farrakhan and therein looms a very grave danger.

    For, should his passing elicit callous, derogatory and disdainful “farewells” from white (and especially Jewish) observers and commentators, those reactions could trigger a severe and violent counter-reaction from a Black world that has deeply admired him and one which could plunge America into a bloodbath. This will be no ordinary exit. Nothing will underscore Farrakhan’s global significance quite like the varied and voluminous responses to his eventual passing. The blogosphere has already begun to fill up with some truly offensive and sickening gloating over his current plight and one doesn’t need to be a clairvoyant to foresee severe racial strife if these obscene and depraved responses are played out in global radio and televisual fora like The Rush Limbaugh Show and its recklessly idiotic televisual twin, the FOX News Network.

    Even more foreboding will be the response of that Stetson-wearing imbecile in the White House. Should President George W. Bush strike even the slightest hint of the wrong note and dismiss Farrakhan as a “divisive hater” or anything along those lines he could very well open up an unbridgeable chasm between the races and trigger a full-scale civil war in the United States. Never before has such a thermonuclear ticking time-bomb hovered over the heads of the American people. These are very dangerous times indeed. If you thought the OJ Simpson and Michael Jackson trials were divisive just you wait for this to go down. How America responds to his departure will decide the fate of that entire nation and Farrakhan could very well succeed in finally uniting the entire Black and Muslim worlds (and fulfilling the EJM “get all my people” prophecy) with his death than he was ever able to achieve in life.

    - XYBØRG
    28 September 2006

    from http://afristok-7.blogspot.com/
     
  4. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Unfortunately, much of what this article calls for is much too late. The need for "global alliances" is something I have personally tried to emphasize long before even the deaths of Kwame Ture and Khalid Muhammad, who spent a great deal of their latter years trying to accomplish this same task.

    Farrakhan is indeed the 'Final Call' on this one but Black folks still ain't having it.

    Minister Farrakhn for years has described hiself as a "time bomb ready to go off".

    His death, which is no doubt eventual, and may come sooner than we think, for sure may resonate globally more than any of us are ready for. (Personally, I will soon be getting my passport and possibly heading for anywhere other than the US)
     
  5. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    It doesn't really matter because he has described hiself as the LAST Prophet of Elijah Muhammad who is Allah's LAST Messenger.

    According to this, there is to be no Prophet after the LAST.
     
  6. SAMURAI36

    SAMURAI36 Banned MEMBER

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    That does not mean that leadership is not necessary for the Nation. Even in traditional Islamic legacy, a successor was chosen as a Shakyh, Imam, Mullah, etc. after the "last Messenger".

    PEACE
     
  7. KWABENA

    KWABENA STAFF STAFF

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    ...Who are you telling...

    My 'inner-being' always gives me a Strange feeling when I utter spending the rest of my life in this KKKountry. As a matter of fact, I am moreso looking to own property out of this "place" than within.

    KD
     
  8. uplift19

    uplift19 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  9. uplift19

    uplift19 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Well, currently the Executive Council seems to be holding things down. I think ultimately one person cannot be a "successor" just as Min. Farrakhan does not see himself as the "successor" of Elijah Muhammad.
     
  10. oldiesman

    oldiesman Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    farrakhan...

    i guess this means that there won't be anymore millon dollar[opps]million man marches anytime soon.
     
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