Black People : FAMOUS NAMES ON GHETTO STREETS...

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Isaiah, Jan 7, 2005.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    African folks, gotta bounce for the weekend, but I wanted to put this thought out there for everyone's opinion...

    I sometimes feel a sense of shame about putting Marcus Garvey, Malcolm's, and Adam Clayton Powell's names on some of the ugly streets in our neighborhoods... Martin Luther King Blvd in most African communities doesn't reflect the greatness and grandeur of the man... It is like a major smack in the face of all the great Africans who gave their lives for a bunch of chronic ghettoites who just don't care...

    Know I will receive some flack, but that is how I feel... Don't name no MO' failing ghetto school houses after my heroes... Carter G. Woodson elementary school where all the miseducated negroes are in special ed... Shameful@!

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  2. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    I feel you here like MLK blvd runs through the ghetto run down hoods
    but i have to say Malcolm-X-College 1900 W. Van buren hold top flight students
    Teachers and programs or the Carver high school or park name after F. Douglass
    where high crime take place so i know what you mean by using great names .
     
  3. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    You know Brother Isaiah, I never looked at it this way. What you expressed makes sense but if not there, then my fear is the leaders whose names grace these streets and schools will be lost forever. Maybe a better approach would be to hold the administrators of these schools and parents whose children attend these schools to a different set of expectations. The educational component can and should extend BEYOND the name on the street or the building.

    Maybe it's not so important what you call it , but more about what we know about these leaders, what they stood for and against, and the communities that support them actually demonstrating a healthy respect for their messages through daily living. We have to find a way to take the good from the past and make it real for us today. Marcus, Malcolm and Martin did their living and now it's up to us to demonstrate how we do ours.

    Queenie :spinstar:
     
  4. KWABENA

    KWABENA STAFF STAFF

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  5. CarrieMonet

    CarrieMonet Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Although part of Martin Luther King Way here in Seattle is a little run down (currently being remodeled), most of it is in nice areas. The Douglas Truth Library has been kept up and is slated to be remodeled soon. The Medgar Evers Swimming Center could use a little updating, but it's still not run down. Langston Hughes Theatre could be bigger...but it's still a nice arts center...

    I do agree with the overall concensus though...whenever I visit a city out of state, Martin Luther King streets are generally in black run down neighborhoods.
     
  6. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Cedric, you're on point as regards monuments that give honour and respect and majesty to our Great Ones, but it is not about WHO is in power as regards how we treat the streets we live on... BTW, African American activists and politicians are the ones who move to have these streets named in our heroes honor, not White Folks... They wouldn't dare live on a street so named - unless it was named before they got there...

    In Harlem, Lenox Avenue is now named after Malcolm X, 7th Avenue after Adam Clayton Powell, and 8th Avenue is named after Frederick Douglass, and none is worthy of those names - seriously... In Brooklyn, we've got Marcus Garvey Blvd and Malcolm X Blvd, and they both shoulda stayed Sumner and Reid Avenues as far as I am concerned... Ugly streets, ugly actions, ugly attitudes permeate and pervade the area, and I am not proud to have the names of these men plastered all over the street signs... There is an attempt to name Fulton Street here, Harriet Tubman Blvd... Nope, please, NO! This street is alright, and it is undergoing major changes at present... Wait until it has been cleaned up to adorn it with this great woman's name... That's my opinion...

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  7. KWABENA

    KWABENA STAFF STAFF

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  8. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    I guess in some states and cities many famous names on streets are in
    beat up run down areas but also you can fine in every state a nice clean place
    with a name of a street from a great famous person ..
     
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