Black People : Face of US poverty: These days, more poor live in suburbs than in cities

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Clyde C Coger Jr, Sep 11, 2013.

  1. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Face of US poverty: These days, more poor live in suburbs than in cities

    The rise in suburban poverty reflects long-term demographic shifts – America is more than ever a suburban nation – as well as economic changes.



    Marcus Thomas, a lanky, unemployed construction worker, says he moved out of Roseland, a poor neighborhood on Chicago's South Side, because it had become too dangerous.
    "I couldn't walk down the street without someone pulling out a gun on me," he says.
    "It's better than the city," he says. "There's not too much violence."
    Suburbs are increasingly becoming the address of America's poor. Suburban poverty across the country grew 53 percent between 2000 and 2010, more than twice the rate of urban poverty, according to a recent report by the Brookings Institution. For the first time, more poor people live in the suburbs than in cities.
    "I think suburban poverty is here to stay," says Alan Berube, one of the authors. "It's not going to revert back to the cities."

    suggested reading:
    http://news.yahoo.com/face-us-poverty-days-more-poor-live-suburbs-124134292.html
     
  2. WhatNeedsToBeDone

    WhatNeedsToBeDone Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    It's really hard for me to believe. I think a breakdown based on percentage than raw numbers would paint a MUCH more *accurate* picture.

    In some cities like DC and a couple others; the poor are being pushed into further out areas which can be less expensive sometimes. In DC, many of the poor are being pushed into Prince Georges County which is a suburban county known for black success. I have nothing against poor people but unfortunately, this will likely lower the household income and increase the crime rate of the county; which is very sad.

    As for the NYC area, much of the poverty is being pushed further out into the outer-boroughs but it won't reach the suburbs due to it having extremely high taxes and poor public transportation. The only suburbs of NYC that are susceptible to this are some New Jersey suburbs like the Newark-E.Orange, Paterson and Jersey City areas; but these particular areas are already poor so there wouldn't be much of a change in culture.
     
  3. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    ... Believe it:


    By official measures, poverty has risen dramatically in the United States. Between 2000 and 2011, the nation's poor increased from 33.9 million to 46.2 million. As of 2010, 55 percent of the poor in major metropolitan areas were living in the suburbs. Among the "near poor" – those with incomes as much as twice the poverty level – 63 percent were living in the suburbs. (The poverty threshold for a family of four is currently $23,550.)
     
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