Black Education / Schools : Excellent African Language materials

Discussion in 'Black Education / Schools' started by skuderjaymes, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

    Country:
    Japan
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2009
    Messages:
    8,757
    Likes Received:
    5,870
    Occupation:
    independent thoughtist thinker, context linker
    Location:
    theory to application to discussion to percussion
    Ratings:
    +6,043
    The Foreign Service Institute has a wonderful repository of language resources freely avaliable @ http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.php The foreign service institute develops language programs for the department of state.. and as a result, these language courses are phenomenally detailed and thorough.. most of these language resources are in MP3 audio format with 200 - 400 page PDF guidebooks also.. I reccomend you download these language resources and add them to your personal library. These kinds of materials won't be available forever.

    Amharic is a Semitic language spoken in Ethiopia. It is the second most-spoken Semitic language in the world, after Arabic, and the official working language of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia.

    http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.php?page=Amharic

    The Fula or Fulani language is a language of West Africa. It is spoken as a first language by the Fulɓe (Fula or Fulani people) and related groups (such as the Tukulor in the Senegal River Valley) from Senegambia and Guinea to Cameroon and Sudan. It is also spoken as a second language by peoples in various areas of the region.

    http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.php?page=Fula

    Nyanja (chinyanja), also known as Chewa (chicheŵa) after the largest tribe speaking it, is a Bantu language spoken by over 15 million people in southern Africa

    http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.php?page=Chinyanja

    Hausa is the Chadic language with the largest number of speakers, spoken as a first language by about 25 million people, and as a second language by about 18 million more, an approximate total of 43 million people.[1] Hausa is one of Africa's largest spoken languages after Arabic, French, English, Portuguese and Swahili.

    http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.php?page=Hausa

    Igbo (Igbo: Asụsụ Igbo), or Igbo proper, is a native language of the Igbo people, an ethnic group primarily located in southeastern Nigeria. There are approximately 20 million speakers that are mostly in Nigeria and are primarily of Igbo descent. Igbo is a national language of Nigeria. It is written in the Latin script, which was introduced by British colonialists. Secret societies such as the Ekpe use the Nsibidi symbols which were invented by the Ejagham and were used to represent other languages like Efik

    http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.php?page=Igbo

    Kirundi, also known as Rundi, is a dialect of the Rwanda-Rundi language spoken by some 8.7 million people[citation needed] in Burundi and adjacent parts of Tanzania and Congo-Kinshasa, as well as in Uganda. It is the official language of Burundi. (The Kinyarwanda dialect is the official language of neighboring Rwanda.)

    http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.php?page=Kirundi

    Kituba is a widely used lingua franca in Central Africa. It is a creole language[1] based on Kikongo, a family of closely related Bantu languages. It is an official language in Congo-Brazzaville and Congo-Kinshasa.

    http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.php?page=Kituba

    Lingala, or Ngala, is a Bantu language spoken throughout the northwestern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Congo-Kinshasa) and a large part of the Republic of the Congo (Congo-Brazzaville), as well as to some degree in Angola and the Central African Republic. It has over 10 million speakers. It is classified C.36D under the Guthrie system for classifying Bantu languages and C.40 under the SIL system.

    http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.php?page=Lingala

    Ganda, or Luganda is the major language of Uganda, spoken by over sixteen million Ganda and other people mainly in Southern Uganda, including the capital Kampala. It belongs to the Bantu branch of the Niger–Congo language family.

    http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.php?page=Luganda

    Shona (or chiShona) is a Bantu language, native to the Shona people of Zimbabwe and southern Zambia; the term is also used to identify peoples who speak one of the Shona language dialects: Zezuru, Karanga, Manyika, Ndau and Korekore. (Some researchers include Kalanga: others recognise Kalanga as a distinct language in its own right.) Shona is a principal language of Zimbabwe, along with Ndebele and the official business language, English.

    http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.php?page=Shona

    Swahili or Kiswahili[3] (known in Swahili itself as Kiswahili) is a Bantu language spoken by various ethnic groups that inhabit several large stretches of the Mozambique Channel coastline from northern Kenya to northern Mozambique, including the Comoro Islands.[4] It is also spoken by ethnic minority groups in Somalia. Although only five million people speak Swahili as their mother tongue,[5] it is used as a lingua franca in much of East Africa, meaning the total number of speakers exceeds 60 million.

    http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.php?page=Swahili

    Akan, also known as Twi and Fante, is an Akan language that is the principal native language of Ghana, spoken over much of the southern half of that country, by about 52% of the population, and to a lesser extent across the border in eastern Côte d'Ivoire. Three dialects have been developed as literary standards with distinct orthographies, Asante, Akuapem (together called Twi), and Fante, which despite being mutually intelligible were inaccessible in written form to speakers of the other standards. In 1978 the Akan Orthography Committee established a common orthography for all of Akan, which is used as the medium of instruction in primary school by speakers of several other Akan languages such as Anyi, Sefwi, Ahanta as well as the Guang languages.

    http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.php?page=Twi

    Yorùbá (native name èdè Yorùbá, 'the Yorùbá language') is a Niger–Congo language spoken in West Africa by approximately 20 million speakers.[1] The native tongue of the Yoruba people, it is spoken, among other languages, in Nigeria, Benin, and Togo and in communities in other parts of Africa, Europe and the Americas. It is most closely related to the Itsekiri language spoken in the Niger-Delta and Igala spoken in central Nigeria. It is more widely related to other Nigerian Niger–Congo languages including Edo, Igbo and Nupe.

    http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.php?page=Yoruba

    [​IMG]
     
  2. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2009
    Messages:
    6,893
    Likes Received:
    3,608
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +4,095
    There was a question asked on another messageboard asking which one afrikan language, afrikan folk should use to communicate with afrikan folks throughout the continent and the diaspora. Someone asked, which of these languages has its own script. I figured that whichever language, it should have its own script.
     
  3. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

    Country:
    Japan
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2009
    Messages:
    8,757
    Likes Received:
    5,870
    Occupation:
    independent thoughtist thinker, context linker
    Location:
    theory to application to discussion to percussion
    Ratings:
    +6,043
    I think Africa is too big and diverse for it to be just one language. Maybe the question may have to be broken into regions. I met one of my Igbo brothers last night at a club, he said he spoke 6 languages. I actually went searching for these language resources to help me learn Igbo from him. I plan to spend some time with each of these languages.. And also Arabic, portuguese, French and chinese.. Those are all relevant languages on the continent of Africa.
     
  4. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2009
    Messages:
    6,893
    Likes Received:
    3,608
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +4,095
    Yeah, the continent is huge yet if we were to criss-cross and zigzag afrika, I'd bet at worse we'd be a few clicks away from someone who could speak english as prevailing as it is, then behind that french and or arabic. But hey, nothing speaks pan-afrikanism like a people agreeing to take one authentic afrikan language for afrikans throughout the afrikan world. ...With its own script, of course. The rest of the world would certainly take note.

    Easier said than done? Absolutely!

    In fact many years ago there was a conference in ghana, where afrikan heads of states attended. Among several issues to be addressed, these knuckle-heads were arguing over which one of their colonial masters' language should be used as a means for the afrikan throughout afrika to communicate with each other. Not and afrikan language. Not wolof or twi... nothing like that.

    However if man can create beef in a petri-dish, it is surely not out of the realm of possibility.
     
  5. SPEAKFREEDOMnet

    SPEAKFREEDOMnet Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2008
    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    147
    Ratings:
    +147
    BIG UPS 2U brotha skuderjaymes for sharing this!

    Uhuru sasa

     
  6. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

    Country:
    Japan
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2009
    Messages:
    8,757
    Likes Received:
    5,870
    Occupation:
    independent thoughtist thinker, context linker
    Location:
    theory to application to discussion to percussion
    Ratings:
    +6,043
    up... download these materials while they are still available.. things change.
     
  7. Aluku

    Aluku Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    Messages:
    344
    Likes Received:
    105
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +135
    Increasingly it's English. We in the West often can't understand the fact that Africa seems so "fractured", but it has always been like that. It is not wrong, as the Europeans want us to believe.

    That is why the borders imposed on most African countries rarely mean anything in real live for the people. A border isn't going to change who your great great uncle or auntie is :) It is the same among the Arabs as well. Each country is made up of various clans which are largely organized by bloodlines & alliances between different bloodlines!
     
  8. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2009
    Messages:
    6,893
    Likes Received:
    3,608
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +4,095
    Pardon me, but who is 'we'?

    The idea of finding a language that afrikans, home or abroad, can agree on and exercise speaks to realization
    of how "fractured" afrikans are... all over the world.
     
  9. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

    Country:
    Japan
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2009
    Messages:
    8,757
    Likes Received:
    5,870
    Occupation:
    independent thoughtist thinker, context linker
    Location:
    theory to application to discussion to percussion
    Ratings:
    +6,043
    English language is limited by the conceptions of the English. Their language comes with their mode of being.. And their way of seeing.
     
  10. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

    Country:
    Japan
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2009
    Messages:
    8,757
    Likes Received:
    5,870
    Occupation:
    independent thoughtist thinker, context linker
    Location:
    theory to application to discussion to percussion
    Ratings:
    +6,043
    I think we would have to create a new language and build the culture we wish to see into the language itself.
     
Loading...