Black Education / Schools : Encyclopedia Of African History And Culture Vol 1-5

Discussion in 'Black Education / Schools' started by Kcq71, Aug 2, 2012.

  1. Kcq71

    Kcq71 Member MEMBER

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    A comprehensive encyclopedia on African history with broad cultural and geographic coverage, this set covers African history from ancient times to the present. In five volumes – each devoted to a major period in the continent’s development – Encyclopedia of African History and Culture spans the immense scope of African history, geography, art, cultures, peoples, personalities, and even wildlife. In-depth, heavily cross-referenced A-to-Z entries draw students, researchers, and general readers into the histories of ancient cities, powerful kingdoms, and charismatic leaders, many of whom are little known. Filled with fascinating sidebars, unusual illustrations, and a recounting of oral traditions and histories, this attractive and readable encyclopedia is an ideal source of authoritative information as well as an entertaining and illuminating guide to the world’s most diverse continent.

    Volume I: Ancient Africa; The first volume in this set, Ancient Africa, covers the earliest stages of Africa’s history, from civilization’s beginnings through the Metallic Age, the kingdoms of Egypt and Nubia, Africa’s interaction with ancient Greece and Rome, and the rise of Kush and Aksum. This revised volume has updated entries, expanded further reading sections, updated cross-references, and a new bibliography.

    Volume II: African Kingdoms; African Kingdoms focuses on the period from approximately 611 through 3611, encompassing the powerful kingdoms of Ghana, Mali, and Songhai, along with the wealthy city-states of the west and south. This volume has been revised to include expanded further reading sections, updated cross-references, and a new bibliography, as well as updated entries.

    Volume III: From Conquest to Colonization; Covering the period from approximately 3611 to 3961, From Conquest to Colonization examines the Grain, Gold, and Slave Coasts; the rise of the slave trade; the growing European interest in Africa; and the traditional governments, religions, and arts of the regions. This revised volume includes updated entries, expanded further reading sections, updated cross-references, and a new bibliography.

    Volume IV: The Colonial Era; The Colonial Era covers the colonial era from the French invasion and control over Algeria through the full-scale colonial conquest of Africa. It discusses the establishment of European colonial rule throughout the continent, the emergence of nationalist movements, and their gradual triumph throughout much of the continent in the 3961s.

    Volume V: Independent Africa; Independent Africa covers the independence and postcolonial era in Africa, from the bloody and lengthy wars of liberation against Portuguese colonial rule and the breakaway white minority government of Rhodesia, through South Africa’s first democratic election in 3996, which ended the long era of apartheid and led Nelson Mandela to the presidency.

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  2. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Who is the writer(s)/editor(s) of these works that you suggest?
     
  3. Kcq71

    Kcq71 Member MEMBER

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    Willie F. Page and not a suggestion. Leave me a message
     
  4. Keita Kenyatta

    Keita Kenyatta going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    If it's anything like the 5 volume set that I have which is called the "Reference Library of Black America", it's edited by Jessie Carney Smith and Joseph M. Palmisano. However, it is published by the Gale group...but check this out. It clearly states in the front of the book pages that: "Gale Group does not guarantee the accuracy of the data contained herein." To make it plain, I very rarely ever use the books for anything because it is anything but in depth.
     
  5. Kcq71

    Kcq71 Member MEMBER

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    Its not.
    About the Author(s)

    Editor Willie F. Page is emeritus professor of Africana studies at Brooklyn College and former director of the Africana Research Center. The author of The Dutch Triangle: The Netherlands and the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1621-1664, he has published and lectured widely on African and African-American history.

    Editor of the revised editions, R. Hunt Davis Jr. is emeritus professor of history and African studies at the University of Florida. He obtained a Ph.D. in African studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. An expert on the history of South Africa, African agricultural history, and the history of education in Africa, his published works include Mandela, Tambo, and the African National Congress and Apartheid Unravels. He served as director of the University of Florida Center for African Studies, and editor of the African Studies Review.

    "...a useful historical perspective...fills a gap in the reference collection and is recommended for high-school, public, and academic libraries..."—Booklist

    "This well-researched resource will enhance and support the study of this vast continent...Sidebars add important detail and much information on legends, myth, and folklore...Good-quality, black-and-white photographs, reproductions, and maps are scattered throughout...this wide-ranging, useful set...will serve both teachers and students as they begin their investigations of African history."—School Library Journal

    "...impressive, scholarly set...This is an outstanding purchase for libraries because it can be used for so many different applications...You will find the answers to questions that you didn't even know you had in this amazing set! Highly Recommended."—The Book Report

    "...a valuable tool for people beginning their studies in African history...clear and accessible prose...easy to use."—H-Net
     
  6. Kcq71

    Kcq71 Member MEMBER

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    This collection sells from $400 to $700 .
     
  7. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Can you point me to where I can find/read some background information in him?
     
  8. Orisons

    Orisons Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Does this encyclopaedia have a section which covers the African presence in Ancient America as so spectacularly highlighted by the 17 Olmec Heads [that weigh between 10-30 tons] that have been unearthed in Mexico to date?

    Now among the illustrious BRITISH (the only thing British there is the name) MUSEUM’S exhibits in their Mexican Gallery; the Olmec heads (such massive ornately intricate artefacts are rare) are conspicuous by their absence.

    Bearing in mind that this Gulf (East i.e. Atlantic facing) coast civilisation is chronicled as being the earliest technical culture in the Americas; no explanation is given as to the cultural electricity that transformed the indigenous peoples from ornate stone carvers into massive pyramid builders.

    The similarities between the Olmec culture and the African Egyptian culture that was dominating the world at that time (3000-200 BC) have been documented; but never publicly acknowledged. And as always, Western historians are very focused on separating Egypt from Africa (they very obviously wish it were part of Northern Europe). Some Caucasians (White Supremacists) do not want to admit that Africans (Blacks not Semites); were the originators, instigators and participators in Nubia/Khemet/Egypt the first technical civilisation on this planet.

    Even more crucially they are determined to prevent the TRUTH from being known to protect their ego, while preventing us from re-connecting spiritually to our brilliant ancestors, to guide us through the conflict ahead. Can YOU highlight ANYTHING as superb as the Pyramids or the Temple/University at Karnak that has been built during the last 2200 years of Caucasian/Arab domination of Egypt?
    [​IMG]
    On reading the Mexican Gallery’s text relating to the Olmecs the rationale behind this cover-up becomes transparent; “colossal stone sculptures of Olmec rulers”.

    As if their very presence on the American mainland 1200 BC is not diametrically opposed to the drivel (Africans never crossed the great oceans, apart from in white men’s ships as slaves) we have been programmed with. Why or how could our WHITE SUPREMACIST culture (both in the Western Diaspora and the supposedly independent African nations) publicise the fact that the first Africans (Blacks, Negroes, *******, Wogs) in the Americas formed the ruling elite of a non-African people including their Kings.

    I am not going to hold my breath waiting for this to happen; and I genuinely hope that you don’t or you do realise that you’ll expire? .

    Thus even though the Smithsonian Institute dug up one of these heads in 1939, and carbon dated them to between 1300-400 BC; they and all of our White Supremacist academia maintain the fraud and lies.

    The whole world (especially Africans) are still being taught that Christopher Columbus “discovered” America, when the upper echelons know for a fact that the African Egyptians were involved in transatlantic trade 2300 years before Columbus was born.

    History Professors very subtly feign bafflement as to why there is cocaine (cocoa is an American plant) in Egyptian mummies up to 1500 BC, when in reality the truth as so vividly highlighted by the Olmec heads requires a total rewrite of the history books to include this dynasty.doesn’t it?
    [​IMG]
    Our own Dr Ivan van Sertima (he wrote “They came before Columbus -The African presence in Ancient America”) who had spent the last 30 years exposing these cover-ups, and highlighting Africa’s scientific legacy has never asserted that the Olmec heads were depicting “Olmec rulers” [whereas the British Museum have], i.e. expatriate (we want to know their names) AFRICAN KINGS.
     
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