Ghana : Empire of Ancient Ghana

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by ibrahim, May 13, 2006.

  1. ibrahim

    ibrahim Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    Ghana
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2005
    Messages:
    1,047
    Likes Received:
    122
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    Ghana, West Africa
    Ratings:
    +122
    Ancient Ghana derived power and wealth from gold and the introduction of the camel during the Trans-Saharan trade increased the quantity of goods that were transported. Majority of the knowledge of Ghana comes from the Arab writers. Al-Hamdani, for example, describes Ghana as having the richest gold mines on earth. These mines were situated at Bambuk, on the upper Senegal river. The Soninke people also sold slaves, salt and copper in exchange for textiles, beads and finished goods. They built their capital city, Kumbi Saleh, right on the edge of the Sahara and the city quickly became the most dynamic and important southern terminus of the Saharan trade routes. Kumbi Saleh became the focus of all trade, with a systematic form of taxation. Later on Audaghust became another commercial centre.

    The wealth of ancient Ghana is mythically explained in the tale of Bida, the black snake. This snake demanded an annual sacrifice in return for guaranteeing prosperity in the Kingdom, therefore each year a virgin was offered up for sacrifice, until one year, the fiancé (Mamadou Sarolle) of the intended victim rescued her. Feeling cheated of his sacrifice, Bida took his revenge on the region, a terrible drought took a hold of Ghana and gold mining began to decline. There is evidence found by archaeologists that confirms elements of the story, showing that until the 12th Century, sheep, cows and even goats were abundant in the region.

    The route taken by traders of the Maghreb to Ghana started in North Africa in Tahert, coming down through Sjilmasa in Southern Morocco. From there the trail went south and inland, running parallel with the coast, then round to the south-east through Awdaghust and ending up in Kumbi Saleh - the royal town of Ancient Ghana. Inevitably the traders brought Islam with them.

    The Islamic community at Kumbi Saleh remained a separate community quite a distance away from the King's palace. It had its own mosques and schools, but the King retained traditional beliefs. He drew on the bookkeeping and literary skills of Muslim scholars to help run the administration of the territory. The state of Takrur to the west had already adopted Islam as its official religion and established closer trading ties with North Africa.

    There were numerous reasons for the decline of Ghana. The King lost his trading monopoly, at the same time drought began and had a long-term effect on the land and its ability to sustain cattle and cultivation. Within the Arab tradition, there is the knowledge that the Almoravid Muslims came from North Africa and invaded Ghana. Other interpretations are that the Almoravid influence was gradual and did not involve any form of military takeover.

    In the 11th and 12th Century, new gold fields began to be mined at Bure (modern Guinea) out of commercial Ghana and new trade routes were opening up further east. Ghana then became the target of attacks by the Sosso ruler, Sumanguru. From this conflict in 1235 came the Malinke people under a new dynamic ruler, Sundiata Keita and soon became eclipsed by the Mali Empire of Sundiata.​
     
  2. I-khan

    I-khan Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2005
    Messages:
    1,344
    Likes Received:
    46
    Ratings:
    +47
    Thanks for the post on Ghana,but Ghana was ALWAYS powerfull in W.Afrika and has only been measured by the Arabs standards.Ghana was always rich since th prime reason the Arabs went there was for the riches themselves.




    HTP
     
  3. ibrahim

    ibrahim Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    Ghana
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2005
    Messages:
    1,047
    Likes Received:
    122
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    Ghana, West Africa
    Ratings:
    +122
    Hey there Brother I-khan.
    Ghana( the land of my birth) was always powerful and the introduction of the "desert horse" (Camel) made business easier. Arabs came to ancient Ghana to trade Gold through the barter system of Trade.
     
  4. Mad Skillz

    Mad Skillz Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Messages:
    604
    Likes Received:
    251
    Occupation:
    Real Estate
    Location:
    So. Cal by way of L.I., New York
    Ratings:
    +251
    Indeed the ancient empire of Ghana was marvelous during it's time and is now believed to have been much larger and influential than once thought.

    The rise of ancient Ghana is very significant and should be studied more closely for it's maritime expeditions which will tell us more about West Africa's contact with the Americas.

    In addition to hard evidence which already exist of ancient Ghana's seafaring expeditions to the Americas, a new archaeologist who's name escapes me at the moment conducts field research in the Mauritania/Senegal region in search of the type of vessel used during the era of ancient Ghana.

    Unfortunately much of the antiquities recovered from West African kingdoms have never been seen by the public which I'm certain
    the answer to many questions are hidden in the basement of European museums.
     
  5. militant

    militant Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2005
    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    3
    Ratings:
    +3
    Ummmm.....Not to burst your bubble, but the actual site of the Empire of Ghana and the country dubbed Ghana today are on different locations. Anyone born in Mali seems to be on the soil of most of the West African Kingdoms.
    http://encarta.msn.com/media_461516747/The_Great_West_African_Empires.html
     
  6. I-khan

    I-khan Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2005
    Messages:
    1,344
    Likes Received:
    46
    Ratings:
    +47
    I think what is being implied is that the Empire of Ghana was larger than modern his-storians would like to tell.just as Mad Skillz said.
     
  7. militant

    militant Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2005
    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    3
    Ratings:
    +3
    No offence to him. He is my brother. However, when I read a post, I read what was actually written, and not what I feel/thought should have been written. Tell me how difficult the following is to comprehend:
    And provide me evidence showing the Empire of Ghana was larger than given in the map!
     
  8. African_Prince

    African_Prince Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2005
    Messages:
    775
    Likes Received:
    48
    Ratings:
    +48
    How's it going, Militant? The modern country Ghana was named so because it is believed that the ancient migrants of 'Ghana' (the actual name was Wagadugu, 'Ghana' was the title of the kings ), located in parts of present day Mali,southern Mauritania and northern Senegal migrated into what is now Ghana and modern Ghanaians are their descendents. It lasted from the 7th to 11th century (although oral tradition claims origins from the 7th century BC ) before it was crushed by Almoravid Berber Muslims and again after 1180-1230 when the Soso briefly controlled a kingdom making up the southern portions of the Ghanaian empire.
     
  9. militant

    militant Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2005
    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    3
    Ratings:
    +3
    Thanks. Do you have a link showing thus?
     
  10. African_Prince

    African_Prince Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2005
    Messages:
    775
    Likes Received:
    48
    Ratings:
    +48
Loading...