Black Entertainment : ELEVATING TUPAC

Discussion in 'Black Entertainment' started by Isaiah, Jul 11, 2004.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Looking back on his life and career in the entertainment world, I often wonder what this young brother did besides be the son of a former Black Panther, that would make folk want to elevate him to the status of Black Leader???

    Granted, Tupac Shakur was a man of stupendous artistic talent and ability, and had the kind of looks that made the young ladies swoon, but none of that qualifies one as a leader... Cats who are weak in the flesh enough to allow a young woman to perform cunnilingus on a public dance floor as our leader??? I think we doth jest(smile!) Imagine what the F.B.I. and C.I.A. would present as temptations to sell his soul to a man like that???

    Yeah, the cat was a great lyricist, but I dug Chuck D. better, I dug KRS1 better, and I think both of them are far more principled, and circumspect in their behaviour... I think Talib Kwele, Most Def, Common, and The Roots, are also tremendous in their presentations of conscious music, and yet I aint following behind them either... Same with my girl, Lauryn Hill, who's a beautiful and conscious lady with troubles...

    But, back to Tupac... Prolific indeed he was, prodigiously gifted though he was... How do we fix our faces to mention his name in the same breath with Malcolm, Martin, Marcus, Frederick Douglass??? The template for Black Leadership, at one time, would not have allowed for that kind of getting things twisted...

    The Honorable Elijah Muhammad had his dalliances with those secretaries, and he was castigated and cursed... Martin Luther King, also, had his dalliances, but not on the freakin' dance floor for all the world to see... It is a given that men in powerful and prestigious positions get opportunities with women that the average cat doesn't... These two, as well as some others, have taken advantage of their positions of prestige, and were wrong, wrong, wrong to do so... By the same token, these men's accomplishments will live on in our history as being among some of the greatest contributions made to our struggles for human rights in America... Can we honestly say that about Tupac Shakur???

    Certainly, he was young, and had lots of room for growth, but so too was Malcolm(27)when he took over Temple #7 in Harlem is 1952, and within 5 years had established the Muhammad Speaks Newspapers, and built the Nations' membership to near 200,000 members... Dr. King was 26 years old when he took over the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and Kwame Ture, Jamil Al-Amin, Huey Newton, and Bobby Seale were all in their early twenties when they ascended to leadership... Youth aint no excuse!!!

    Overall, I think we jumped the gun on this guy before truly taking his temperature and temperment for leadership. Speaking fiery rhetoric, and flying off the handle on the authorities is nice imagery, but it don't qualify you as a leader(smile!) As an addendum to that, building a fine record company, and holding white parties on the Hamptons doesn't qualify you as a leader either... I just hope our young folks aren't fooled, tricked, duped, and bamboozled by the media imagery and photo ops...
    In short, don't choose your leaders from no slick brochures, and infomercials... Leaders are made by what they do at the grassroots level, long before they ascend to the spotlights...

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  2. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Brother Isaiah ... i'm just gonna move on out da way, so none of the bullets aimed at you, hit me ... (handing you a bullet proof vest, as i back slowly away) ... :)

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  3. Therious

    Therious Banned MEMBER

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    all i can say is that record companies, mtv, bet, and radio stations made tupac into a "voice' for the people. i must say first pac was a deep brother, who had a lot to say politically. however compared to other emcees(the ones isaiah mentioned and others) he was only a mediocre talent. but he was a talent,i was not a pac fanatic, but was a fan.

    i think people get it twisted when looking at pacs career, if u listen to his early albums -"2pacalypse now", "strikly for my n&&gas"," me against the world". then compare them with the last album before he died "all eyes on me " one can only conclude money took control of this guy. many hip hop hedz will tell you after pac signed w/ death row, he went from political to material.

    as for comparison to mlk, brotha x, ect. keep in mind pac came up in very different times. pac was a rapper from the reaganomics error, an error much more violent, and raw then the fifties, sixties or seventies(yes i am aware of the turbulant racial times,assinations, riots ect. back then) .

    An error where black people saw a vicious assault on inner city areas (and harassment of suburban blacks w/ random searches by police ect.)w/ c.i.a crack distrobution, manditory drug laws, the germ weapon-hiv/aids, gang wars, semi automatic weapons, ending of public/community programs, intense policing , just to name a few.

    as for him doing what he did on stage, like i said this error is much more raw, pacs generation (mine too) doesn't believe in fronting, also sex sells in the music industry.

    with that said people trying to make money off of pacs name is why he is being presented as a heroe. when i listen to pacs music I hear a revolutionary,as well as some ignorance(mostly on his later albums). again money took contol of his voice , and some say eventually got him killed.
     
  4. daroc

    daroc Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    im understandin what ur sayin isaiah... but im feelin wat therious is sayin as well...

    personally.. i value tupac cuz his poetry.. and like therious said.. his early albums.. but even his recent poetry deont reflect the concepts his recent albums have.

    i think allot of the time.. as for him being one of the best rappers.... many peole tend to jus say what they hear.. without often even listenin to his albums.. or judgin by jus one.. ..

    i dotn kno i9f u can place him in the category wit malcom and martin... that never crossed my mind. now his mother she may have more of a changce then him... but i like u said... it jus dont seem right

    wat im wonderin is where is all this money being made off his name going.... i kno he has kids.. and his moms... and she donates some.. but where is the rest.. why is there a need to still p4roduce and sell unrealeased records for a"dead' man... that is more known and "liked" now that he is dead. it5 jus seems odd
     
  5. MrBlak

    MrBlak Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Therious is so right that 2Pac's style changed in 96. His last 2 albums and the tidal wave of singles on movie soundtracks and compilations that he recorded after Me Against The World were in a different tone and style. I lost interest in him towards the end of his life and wont bother with all these remixed, made up songs they put out in CD after CD. His older material is excellent and he is in a way a leader in putting out the word. He is not as much as people make him out to be, but that is the nature of dying in the middle of a career. He is not the devil older folks make him out to be either, but that is the nature of doing something different from the "good old days".

    I guess I am in the middle on this topic.
     
  6. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    LOL! Destee! It's awight, brother Rev. Ike got his burnin' suit on today! I'm ready for all who wanna TESTIFYYYYYYYiYiYi! Kin ah git a few witnessesinthisyhyeahhousetoniiiiiite!(smile!)

    Brother Therious, how you, brother! Your last sentence is right on point, and I think THAT kind of unprincipled behaviour on our brother's part is what resoundingly disqualifies him from any consideration for a position of leadership - even dog-catcher... Living as we do, in a republic that boasts the strongest intelligence agencies in the world, such a man would set himself up to have the very same people following him, turn on him with a viciousness inconceiveable to a Dr. King or Malcolm X.

    By living a life as "raw" as you say he lived, the F.B.I. would make mincemeat of his credibility among the people, and as much as we like to say that we aren't influenced by the White Man's media, we most certainly are... Besides, these intelligence people have enuff of us in their employ to dress their bad intentions up in Black Face, so don't put it past them to exact maximum influence on a great many of us...

    Back in the day, young Fred Hampton, at 20 years of age, embodied all that we could only wish Tupac could've been... This guy was awesome, 6-foot-three and 240 pounds of muscle, and handsome and eloquent as they come... He single-handedly got the Blackstone Rangers, Chicago's roughest youth gang, to transform their directionless and violent gang into an organization for social change, and in so doing made himself a target for an F.B.I. assassination on December 4, 1969...

    He was the guy they thought they'd gotten rid of when they killed Malcolm and Martin, but younger!!! They wasted little time after discovering his power, charisma, and potential in putting him on ice... That's the way the game was played back then, when it appeared that all of the sophisticated dirty tricks in the world would not stop Africans from organizing for our freedom... Now, they just sit back and let us destroy ourselves... Sad, man...

    I'm hoping young folks will wake up, and study our past so that THEY can move us forward... Having a stiff neck to criticism - constructive criticism- will doom us to repeat the mistakes of the past... Choosing unprincipled people as our leadership, because they're cute, and talented, will doom us and them to failure... If it's ever to be Nation Time for Africans in America, then we gotta know what time it is, and that TIME cannot be found on P.Diddy's rolex, or in R. Simmons' rolodex. These cats don't wanna lead, they wanna party and B.S., and young peops, you got to know this, and act accordingly... There's better leadership in the young people who post to this board than can be seen on BET, MTV, or VH1... I believe that with all my heart...

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  7. daroc

    daroc Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    said it like it is....
     
  8. Therious

    Therious Banned MEMBER

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    right u r isaiah, i knew some blackstones from chi town, although they far from being activists-lol. just wanted to say p. diddy and russell simmons are organizing a rally in nyc on august 30th or 31st. they r protesting democrat john kerry and calling on him to speak more on and formulate a plan to get rid of new yorks med evil drug laws.. russell simmons has been working on drug law reform and registering voters as wll as p. diddy,however i dont know how much of that is sincere or for publicity. but those cats seem to be trying to make some noise. again if there foreal.
     
  9. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    pac was a brutha a voice of struggling speaking through his music
    a poetic voice touching inner lives in ways, he was one who stood
    up and face whatever came his way I never took him as a born leader
    but for what he was through his music & writting as a speaker for the
    people, in all means as speaker how he let it be known that we still
    face this struggle and he was the son of a BP member which was a strong
    organization PAC was a speaker sending the message out !
     
  10. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Daroc, your questions regarding Afeni Shakur's handling of Tupac's remaining catalogue are touchy, but quite interesting... I have to admit to some ruminating about Tupac's troubles with his financial decision-making, and where was Afeni when her son needed the guidance... Now she's all up in every courthouse trying to see to it that his affairs are straight... Hey, it's touchy because we'd all say that this is what a mother should do, and any parent would do... But where was Afeni when this young man was alive, and acting a fool out here??? Where was his dad, as well???

    I know some folks are gonna say I'm hard on his parents, that 25-year old men do what they wanna do, and my own experience tells me that's most true(smile!) But even as I've done what I wanted to do, my parents influence was never far from me... So a bunch a wiiiiiiild stuff I wanted to do back in the day, I didn't do, because I was taught that it was just WRONG.... That is how being reared a certain way, being influenced a certain way, works subliminally on a child even when they're an adult... I've seen it with my own babies, who are a bit too conservative for me at times(smile!) But interesting question Daroc, very interesting indeed...

    Brother Mr. Blak, we meet again(smile!) Listen my beautiful young brother, I feel you on the era in which you've come up in being different, but I sense that you feel it's been so much harder on this generation than others??? If I am wrong, correct me... I don't want to go off spieling on the hardships of past generations without clarification from you on this...

    I read a couple of books in 2003 that shall forever keep the hardships of African Americans in this generation in proper perspective... One is titled, Trouble In Mind:African Americans in the age of Jim Crow, 1865-1920, by Leon F. Litwack, and the other by Phillip Dray, titled At The Hands Of Persons Unknown: History of Lynching in America... I may have the subtitles wrong, but the authors of the books are correct... Man, our hardships under Jim Crow are heartwrenching, because the LAW of the land said that it was perfectly alright to treat our ancestors as less than dogs, so they had no legal recourse against the quite arbitrary depredations against their persons by white people - any white people... Racial Profiling and arbitrary Police actions and harrasment against African people started when we got off the boats here, so don't be misled...

    In the 1860's, following the end of Enslavement, the Black Codes were enacted, which were nothing more than laws designed to return us to slavery... Vagrancy and Contract Labor laws, which made being a black male over the age of 13, and unemployed, punishable by a prison sentence... What was done in those prisons??? Work farms, our bodies rented out to plantation owners, or government contractors building those courthouses and post offices down in the south... Clearly, the same stuff goes on today within the Prison Industrial Complex, though then our ancestors were literally worked to death for the "crime" of being unemployed...

    This generation needs to read and understand that things have been worse for us in this country, and in this world... The ancestors will inspire you with their courage and determination to weather the worst that was imagineable... I think of them, and what they endured when I am down, and feeling sorry for myself... It doesn't take long for me to get my head out of my backside, and put on my burnin' suit(Smile!) Thank you Ancestors for being so strong for me, thank you...(smile!)

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
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