Black People : Electoral College and Voting

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by tyab14, Aug 15, 2008.

  1. tyab14

    tyab14 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Dec 15, 2007
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    What exactly is the electoral college and how much power does it have in the scheme of things?

    An electoral college is a set of electors who are empowered to elect a candidate to a particular office. Often these electors represent different organizations or entities, with each organization or entity represented by a particular number of electors or with votes weighted in a particular way. Many times, though, the electors are simply important persons whose wisdom, it is hoped, would provide a better choice than a larger body. The system can ignore the wishes of a general membership, whose thinking need not be considered.

    Reading through U.S. history and the beginning of the United States we see the founding father establish an electoral college and the reason verbatum is "because the common folk may not be able to choose a leader". If we check the constitution we can see the real deal with the electoral college and its connections to voting in our present time.

    Some say that no American has EVER voted a President into office at least not since the constitution of the United States was adopted. Lets check it out.
    Constitution Article II, Section 1, Clauses 1-3:

    Clause 1:

    The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America. He shall hold his Office during the Term of four Years, and, together with the Vice President, chosen for the same Term, be elected, as follows:

    Clause 2:

    Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.

    Clause 3:

    The Electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by Ballot for two Persons, of whom one at least shall not be an Inhabitant of the same State with themselves. And they shall make a List of all the Persons voted for, and of the Number of Votes for each; which List they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the Seat of the Government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate. The President of the Senate shall, in the Presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the Certificates, and the Votes shall then be counted. The Person having the greatest Number of Votes shall be the President, if such Number be a Majority of the whole Number of Electors appointed; and if there be more than one who have such Majority, and have an equal Number of Votes, then the House of Representatives shall immediately chuse by Ballot one of them for President; and if no Person have a Majority, then from the five highest on the List the said House shall in like Manner chuse the President. But in chusing the President, the Votes shall be taken by States, the Representation from each State having one Vote; A quorum for this Purpose shall consist of a Member or Members from two thirds of the States, and a Majority of all the States shall be necessary to a Choice. In every Case, after the Choice of the President, the Person having the greatest Number of Votes of the Electors shall be the Vice President. But if there should remain two or more who have equal Votes, the Senate shall chuse from them by Ballot the Vice President.

    It looks as though the constitution grants the election of a President to the State Electors. The state governers are the highest officials in the nation to be selected by popular vote.

    Are things still like this or has some ammendment been passed whereas the power of the electoral college was lessoned?