Health and Wellness : EBOLA OUT BREAK SPREADS!

Kemetstry

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Preliminary evidence shows Ebola vaccine is 100% effective.





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Kemetstry

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WHO: Ebola survivors face lingering health complications



BB73tul.img
© Jerome Delay/AP Photo Nowa Paye, 9, is taken to an ambulance after showing signs of the Ebola infection in the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia.

Many Ebola survivors in West Africa are suffering from lingering health problems due to the virus, according to doctors working with the World Health Organization.

Half of survivors have joint pain, which can leave them too debilitated to work, said Daniel Bausch, a member of the WHO clinical care team and an associate professor at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in New Orleans. About 25% have eye complications, which can range from vision changes to uveitis, an inflammation inside the eye that can lead to blindness if not treated.

But treating Ebola-related eye problems isn't easy. Sierra Leone -- a nation of more than 6.4 million people -- has only two ophthalmologists, Bausch said.

Ebola survivors also have dealt with the psychological trauma of the disease, Bausch said.

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa, which began in December 2013, is the largest in history. More than 27,860 people have had Ebola in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone and 11,281 have died, according to the WHO. That leaves more than 16,000 survivors. The largest outbreak before this was in Uganda in 2000-2001, with 425 cases, only half of whom survived.

“The world has never seen so many survivors," said Anders Nordstrom, the WHO representative for Sierra Leone. "This is new, both from a medical point of view, but also from a societal point of view."

In some ways, everyone living in the three countries is a survivor. Virtually everyone knows someone who died from the virus, and everyone has lived with the effects of Ebola on the economy, health care system and society, Nordstrom said.

Doctors don't have enough experience treating Ebola survivors to know exactly what to expect.
But Alie Wurie, a doctor with the Ministry of Health and Sanitation in Sierra Leone, said he's concerned about what will happen when women who survived Ebola get pregnant. Doctors don't know how Ebola will affect pregnant survivors or their children.
Doctors do know that pregnant Ebola patients were at very high risk of death and very few gave birth to live children, Bausch said. Most babies were miscarried or stillborn. Many of the stillborn babies had major anatomical defects.

"We have very few kids who survived," Bausch said. The WHO plans to release guidelines related to Ebola and pregnancy next week, Nordstrom said.

Ebola cases have been declining in West Africa for the past three weeks, according to the WHO. There were two confirmed cases of Ebola in the week ending Aug. 2, with one each in Sierra Leone and Guinea. That's the lowest level of cases since March 2014. Liberia has had no Ebola cases since July.
Almost 2,000 contacts of Ebola patients are under observation in Sierra Leone and Guinea, according to the WHO.

This week was the first in three weeks with no new infections among health care workers, who have been hit hard by Ebola. The WHO has reported a total of 880 cases of Ebola in health care workers, along with 512 deaths.
Health professionals would be some of the first to be vaccinated against Ebola, if a working vaccine is approved.
Results from early tests of an experimental Ebola vaccine show that it is "highly effective," the WHO announced last week.





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Fine1952

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Kemetstry

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"Question Of Using Ebola Vaccine In Congo Becomes More Urgent"


An Ebola outbreak affecting up to 20 people in an extremely remote area in the Democratic Republic of Congo presents a high risk at a national level, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Thursday.
In an update on an outbreak that officials believe began in late April, the United Nations health agency said there were two confirmed and 18 suspected cases of Ebola infection.
Three people have died among the suspected and confirmed cases, including a 39-year-old man thought to be the first, or so-called "index" case.
Peter Salama, the WHO's executive director for health emergencies, said the agency's risk assessment on the outbreak was that it is high at a national level, medium at African regional level and low at global level.


However, he added: "We cannot underestimate the logistic and practical challenges associated with this response in a very remote and insecure part of the country.
"As of now, we do not know the full extent of the outbreak, and as we deploy teams over the next few weeks, we will begin to understand . . . exactly what we're dealing with," Salama told reporters on a telephone briefing.
He said the immediate priority would be to trace the around 400 recorded contacts of the suspected and confirmed cases.
This latest Ebola outbreak is Congo's eighth, the most of any country. The deadly hemorrhagic fever was first detected in its dense tropical forests in 1976 and named after the nearby river Ebola.
The WHO said the outbreak is centered in the Likati Health Zone in the remote province of Bas-Uele in northeastern Congo near the border with Central African Republic.
Salama described the area, which is around 1400 kilometers (870 miles)from the capital Kinshasa, as isolated and hard-to-reach, with virtually no functioning telecommunications and few paved roads.
Asked about the potential for using an experimental vaccine, Salama said the logistics were "complex" but that the WHO was working with Congo's government and regulatory authorities.


The vaccine, known as rVSV-ZEBOV and developed by Merck, is not yet licensed but was shown to be highly protective against Ebola in clinical trials published last December.
To use the vaccine, Salama said the WHO would need a fully-approved protocol signed off by regulators, the government and ethics committees, as well as the logistics in place to gain informed consent from all those offered it and to transport and store it at the required minus 80 degrees Celsius (-176 F).
"In an area without telecommunications, without road access, without large-scale electrification, this is going to be an enormous challenge," he said.
"But we are committed to working with . . . partner agencies to implement a vaccination campaign if the (Congo) government gives us a green light."
The three deaths so far are the "index" case - the man who fell sick and sought medical care on April 22 - a motorcycle rider who took him to hospital, and another person who cared for him en route.





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Kemetstry

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An Ebola case in a city of 1.2 million represents a dangerous new phase for the outbreak

  • There's been a disturbing new development in the ongoing Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
  • Health officials have confirmed that an infected person was found in a city of 1.2 million, meaning the disease spread beyond the town it was first spotted in.
  • This brings the total number of Ebola cases to 44, with 3 confirmed, 20 probable, and 21 suspected. There have been at least 23 deaths.
  • Ebola in an urban area is much more dangerous, as that dramatically increases the possibility that the disease could spread rapidly.




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