DUKE ELLINGTON'S WASHINGTON D.C., THE HISTORIC SHAW DISTRICT

Discussion in 'Honoring Black Ancestors' started by Isaiah, May 31, 2006.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
    Messages:
    3,210
    Likes Received:
    62
    Ratings:
    +62
    http://www.pbs.org/ellingtonsdc/vtOtherLandMarks.htm

    GREAT PAGE, THOUGH SOME OF THESE FOLKS AREN'T WASHINGTONIANS, LIKE THURGOOD MARSHALL, A BALTIMOREAN, OR JELLYROLL MORTON, A NEW ORLEANIAN, OR MARY MCLEOD BETHUNE, A FLORIDIAN, OR PAUL ROBESON, AN NEW JERSEYEAN...(SMILE!)




    At the dawn of the 20th century, before the Harlem Renaissance, Duke Ellington's Washington was the social and cultural capital of Black America. From 1900 to 1920, it was this country's largest African American community. Anchored by Howard University and federal government jobs, this community became a magnet for African American intellectuals and sent a stream of shining talents to the nation for generations. It developed a prosperous black middle class which forged a strong society of churches, newspapers, businesses and civic institutions. Its businesses were black owned and run; its buildings, designed, built and financed by blacks; its entertainment, by and for African Americans. This was a proud and elegant community that flourished despite, or perhaps even because, of Jim Crow, the oppressive segregation that forced blacks to create their own separate destiny.

    Noted Black Washingtonians

    Pearl Bailey, singer
    Mary McLeod Bethune, civil rights advocate
    Ed Brooke, US Senator
    Louis N. Brown, musician
    Sterling Brown, poet
    Ralph Bunche, UN Secretary
    Anna J. Cooper, author and educator
    Benjamin O. Davis, Sr., US Army General
    Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., Four-Star US Air Force General
    Dr. Charles Drew, developer of the blood bank
    Frederick Douglass, aboitionist
    Paul Laurence Dunbar, poet
    Billy Eckstein, musician
    Henry Grant, musician
    Frederick Gregory, astronaut
    Charles H. Houston, lawyer
    Langston Hughes, poet
    Georgia Douglas Johnson, writer
    Sam Lacy, sports writer
    Alain Locke, author
    Thurgood Marshall, US Supreme Court Justice
    Robert H. McNeill, photographer
    Jelly Roll Morton, musician
    Oliver "Doc" Perry, musician
    Hough Price, President of the National Urban League
    Addison Scurlock, photographer
    Dr. Billy Taylor, musician
    Mary Church Terrell, abolitionist
    Carter Woodson, historian
    Davey Yarborough, musician Shaw Neighborhood Landmarks

    African American Civil War Memorial
    Armstrong Manual Training High School
    Ben's Chili Bowl
    Bohemian Caverns
    Dunbar High School
    Ellington Mural
    The Howard Theater
    Howard University
    Industrial Bank
    Lincoln Theater and Colonnade
    The Reeves Center
    Remembering U Street Sidewalk Exhibit
    Republic Gardens
    State of the Union
    True Reformers' Hall
    12th Street YMCA
    U Street/Cardozo Metro Station
    The Whitelaw Hotel



    PEACE!
    ISAIAH
     
  2. oldiesman

    oldiesman Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2006
    Messages:
    1,539
    Likes Received:
    119
    Ratings:
    +120
    duke ellington's washington d.c.

    very nice post,growing up in dc i remember all of these landmarks and what was in the place of afew before such as where the reeves building stands was once a peoples drugstore and the high school for the performing arts that is named for the duke was once western high school built in 1890 in georgetown,at one time i lived next door to the famed whitelaw hotel[although at that time it had seen better days]ben's chili bowl has been there forever it seems and the howard is being restored[talk about legendary]two other legendary movie house sadly have been razed[the booker t-the republic]growing up in dc in the fifties and sixties was a blast,black people stuck together in those days[yes we raised the devil,but it seems a day or two later nobody could remember what the beef was about and we didn't dwell on it either]i lived all over the city and had fun at every stop.
     
  3. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
    Messages:
    3,210
    Likes Received:
    62
    Ratings:
    +62
    Actually Oldies, I've been familiar with the whole D.C. history for a long time... As the opening paragraph states, D.C. was probably one of the very first meccas for Black people outside of the south, so a there's a lot of great history with Chocoalate City... I think Gil Scott-Heron made his home there, and Marita Golden, a great, great writer is from there...

    Many years ago, I read a book about Evelio Grillo, an African Cuban from Tampa who got into Dunbar HighSchool with the help of African American school teachers, who felt he could make something of himself by going to the best African Aemrican HS in the nation at that time... This documentary is wonderful, in that it tells the story of Dunbar HS, and the African community in Washington... It's wonderful - as is all of our very colorful history in every state in the United States....


    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  4. OmowaleX

    OmowaleX Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2002
    Messages:
    2,414
    Likes Received:
    39
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Educator
    Location:
    Aztlan
    Ratings:
    +42
    Duke Ellington-Perdido

     
Loading...
Similar Threads - DUKE ELLINGTON'S WASHINGTON
  1. Liberty
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    142
  2. AACOOLDRE
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    182
  3. AACOOLDRE
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    410
  4. CosmicMessenger
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    369
  5. Kemetstry

    Black Entertainment : R.I.P. GEORGE DUKE

    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    826