Black People : DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. - HIS IMAGE IN YOUR MIND...

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Isaiah, Jan 14, 2005.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I thought I would create a thread that would allow us as African people to give our impressions of one of the great men of the 20th Century... It seems he has been reduced to his I Have a Dream speech, and yet he was so much more than that... He was, in addition to being a powerfully eloquent orator, a clergymen, an author, a mentor to many of the leaders who followed him, a father of 4, and a husband...

    Because so many of us have failed to read any works on his life, as well as the worrks he wrote himself, we do not realize that there is a hidden story about this man, and those African people who CHOSE him to be their leader, that is far more poignant and majestic than the events which followed his transcendent speeches...

    For one, Martin "Mike" King chose his middle name from the English religious leader, Marther Luther, and was just 26 years old when he was "selected" as the man who would be best suited to carry through the aims of the Montgomery Improvement Association... He was selected by Mr. E.D. Nixon, the President of the Montgomery, Alabama NAACP, and a former head of the PullMan Porters Union, because he was not an entrenched member of the Montgomery Clergy, and it's elite community. Mr. Nixon understood that Martin could be "controlled" by himself, and the community, and not by those HNIC handkerchief head elitists who had kept Black aspirations in check for their white masters... So Dr. King's ascendency to the head of the Movement was a bit of prescient and profound strategy on the part of Mr. E.D. Nixon, for which he is never credited...

    Another part of the hidden history of Dr. King's rise is "his Victory" down in Birmingham, Alabama... No one ever bothers to mention why, after his victory in Montgomery, Alabama, it took 8 years for him to get back to Alabama to win Birmingham??? Truth is, the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth implored Dr. King to come to Birmingham for all of those years as a board member of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and even taunted King as being "scared of Birmingham." Shuttlesworth was a man of legendary courage, a man who braved iron pipes, brass knuckles, and industrial-strength steel chains to register his daughters in Highschool, and had survived several bombings of his home, and his church... He had even driven his car at break neck speed to cut off a Birmingham City Bus that routinely drove his children more than a mile past their stop in front of the church, and demanded the bus driver turn around a drop the children off where they belonged... His struggle, for 7 long and lonely years down in Birmingham, had cemented him a place of respect among activists around the country, as well as, from his and Dr. Kings' main nemesis, Eugene Theophilis "Bull" Connor, Birmingham's public safety director...

    Shuttlesworth had even suffered 3 broken ribs after having fire hoses turned on him as he attempted to disperse African children following the Project "C" demonstrations... While in the hospital bed, Shuttlesworth learned that King had negotiated an agreement to end all demonstrations with Birmingham's white businessmen, and got out of his sick bed to reject, both, the agreements, and what he felt was Martin's disrespect of the sacrifices so many had made for so long in fighting injustice down in Birmingham... It has been said and the story corroborated, that Rev. Shuttlesworth actually cursed Dr. King out, referring to him as Martin Luther Sh@! for not consulting with him about those agreements...

    My questions to Forum members are as follows:

    What are your personal feelings about Dr. King, and why???

    Do you feel Comparisons between Dr. King and Malcolm X are fair, and Why???

    What do you really KNOW about Dr. King beyond the sound bytes presented of him??? Have you read his own books, as well as those of others???

    Do you Believe that Dr. King has largely been forgotten by my generation of African American, and not respected by the young generation of African Americans???

    How do you, personally, celebrate Dr. King's life and Legacy???

    Happy Birthday, Dr. King!

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  2. PositiveMindset

    PositiveMindset Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I'm glad U started this.

    If more would remember his legacy & teachings, this world would be a much better place.

    But as we all know, all good things must come 2 an end, so do good beliefs.

    The groups that were so prevalent then is few & far between now, even though there are many of them. (Cuz they don't believe what they preach).

    37 years later, situations still exist that he spoke against.

    And nothing's being done.

    I wonder how it would be if he was still alive.
     
  3. daroc

    daroc Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    What are your personal feelings about Dr. King, and why???
    i think at times he doesnt recieve enuf credit... or not the right kind.... but also receives too much sometimes..

    i respect him for what he did... but at times i feel like he gets too much light... when there are too many people that did just as much....he's often the face of the moevemnt and there are others who deserves just as much credit....king was chosen by the mia, sclc, and invited to bham...he was a face for the people just as much as malcom and huey... a face for the people not one for the movement: so many other things/peolple need shine as well....

    i hate the fact that ppl dont know about his failures as much as they proclaim to kno about his triumphs... about how he failed in albany.. or sclc fights wit sncc... or king's willingness to try to persuade others to calm down cuz da prez askd..... i mean we r all human.. and have our failures and down falls...the only way for us to truely value what king did and other alike.. would be to kno the tru story.. or have more than just the info your history teacher planted....he more than just one speech..

    What do you really KNOW about Dr. King beyond the sound bytes presented of him??? Have you read his own books, as well as those of others???

    wat do really kno about anything... if we werent there... we can read the books.. hear stories.. have talks... and learn.. but ultimately we still cook up our own opinions and views... all that stuff do was make me look at king in a whole new light....

    Do you Believe that Dr. King has largely been forgotten by my generation of African American, and not respected by the young generation of African Americans???

    ofcourse.. i mean if we really understood./respected/aprreciate the struggle of our ancestors, martyrs and leaders.. things would be different... but everything has its time.. and takes time.. and one day i believe later on after our time... things will start to come around....hopefully

    i mean while in school... in my civil right class... kids( yes white kids...) were amased by details of the movent and the actions of bull, kennedy, nixon, king, shuttle... and everyone else- "the enemies and the heroes". i can recall one day where i just like the world is so ignorant- when a student asked how long - how many days did the march on washington last- my teacher- she was white- looked at them like they was crazy.....

    How do you, personally, celebrate Dr. King's life and Legacy???

    personally, to be honest....i dont do much...i mean i've been to museaum in atl... been to montgomery and bham.. seen his house... but as for his bday...prolly this year ill go watch the parade.. and that cuz in ny we aint have one.... but i think allot of the reason i havent dun much for him... or any leaders for that matter in the past - is b/c im just starting to appreciate them- im jsut starting to learn more and truely value my history...
     
  4. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

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    peace,

    I feel Dr. King was a great man & a great orator. Yet, I have never been able to agree with non-violence as a strategy against a violent enemy unless as he said your God steps in to fight your battle for you which did not happen. With this approach he caused more violence than that of the approach of El-hajj-Malik-el-shabazz.

    Just as Jesus & Muhammad, I feel these two were actually one! They fought the same oppressor, stood up for the same people & were both trying to find a portion of peace, but as today their RELIGIONS stood in the way.....

    I don't feel the comparisons of black leaders will ever be fair if it leaves the mouths of white people. & most blacks only parrot what tehy see on tv or on the radio....they were scared to death of Malcolm and of the FBI's own records they worked to separate him from Malcolm & Elijah....notice, that when El-hajj left the nation & started his own movement he sought to work with King & unite our people in Africa with America & was not so coincidentally gunned down. The same happened to King when. That one picture where Malcolm & King were photographed together for the first time sent a shock wave thru white america.

    For his born day, I study as he did.....

    I think the late great John Hendrik Clarke summed it up best in the documentary moderated by Westley Snipes when asked about Dr. King he said "I think we should be slow to criticize Dr. King, for he gave his life for what he believed in & we are still here talkin'. I think that is enough proof to prove his bravery over ours"..............
    my final thoughts "any black woman or man willing to go against the grain of society is walking in, or has walked in the footsteps of Jesus."

    I leave u in peace
     
  5. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  6. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  7. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Happy Martin Luther King's Day !!! :birthday:
    Peace!
     
  8. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I have a very similar viewpoint in that "I feel these two were actually ONE"!

    Ase'
     
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