Black People : Dr. Barashango on European Holidays, Black Women...

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Chevron Dove, Oct 27, 2010.

  1. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Dr. Barashango on European Holidays, Black Women...


    http://destee.com/forums/showpost.php?p=614553&postcount=141
    http://destee.com/forums/showpost.php?p=614557&postcount=143
    http://destee.com/forums/showpost.php?p=614722&postcount=148


    Sister...have you read any of Barashango's work? What do you think of it?
    http://destee.com/forums/showpost.php?p=615524&postcount=192

    This is one of his books. Now, where you two would line up in
    terms of your research, I don't know. But, it may be another resource nonetheless. Unfortunately, he's an ancestor now.

    http://destee.com/forums/showpost.php?p=615680&postcount=197

    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    After almost a year since I've first heard of Dr. Barashango, I finally got the chance and time to read about him and some of his beliefs and research. He puts out a lot of information some of which i found to be amazing. But However, some it too, I find to be a little confusing due to his references on certain areas. He refers to the plight of Blacks in the Bible, the mistranslations of the Bible by whites and Jesus. One of his main mentors was Dr. Ben [and Dr. Williams?] and sometimes, I'm confused based upon their collective views on certain subjects. But all in all, I think Dr. Barashango is awesome.

    I first got the time to read about him the day before this past Columbus Day on October 10 and there was so much to absorb, I had to come back to it days later. I spent the past two days listening to many of his blogs and the most interesting to me was his work on European Holidays. Amazing. I also stumbled across some blogs of Dr. Francis Welsing and became caught up in her research as well. Dynamic! She is so awesome. Although I have some questions and viewpoints based upon some of my research, Dr. Barashango gave me an incredible different perspective of certain issues of which I can't put it all together just yet.

    He spoke about (1) Columbus Day, (2) Halloween, the Night of the Living Dead, (3) Misgiving--Thanksgiving, (4) xmas the merry mess, and (5) the 4th of July of which he called, 'U-lie'...


    European Holidays p.1
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WujPMmczKQo

    European Holidays p.2
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=psBKZ-tpxOw&NR=1

    Dr. Barashango / European Holidays / pt. 3
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msfShSbfOew&feature=related

    --Dr. Barashango / European Holidays / pt. 4
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msfShSbfOew&feature=related
     
  2. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Barashango on Abu Bakr & Mansa Musa--AD 1300s

    Barashango on Abu Bakr & Mansa Musa-- the AD 1300s

    [​IMG]

    On the eve of a major holiday I thought it good to refresh myself and share some points that came from the late great Barashango and on his lecture series on European Holidays. Although I embrace this upcoming holiday, Thanksgiving, I do so for specific reasons that are probably not what this government had in mind. And Barashango really brings this point home.

    In Part 1 of his lectures on European Holidays he says that Holidays themselves are ‘the institutionalized celebration of the thoughts and ideas of a particular philosophical world view’, and he said that ‘celebrations play a very definite role.’ We as Black people have an appreciation of other people’s culture. In Part 2, he brings out the fact that Europeans are celebrating their victories over their enemies and during his lectures he makes it clear that we need to understand just who they define as enemies! Barashango list five holidays that he discusses, (1) Columbus Day, (2) Halloween, (3) Thanksgiving, (4) Christmans and (5) the 4th of July.

    Although there are some points that are somewhat contradictory to my research on technical points in Part 3, Barashango has opened my eyes to major historical issues that shows me there are major gaps in this educational system. He clarifies that the word ‘Egypt’ would actually be ‘a misnomer’ of which I also agree. I learned surprisingly that the Atlantic ocean was actually called ‘the Ethiopian Sea’ by the Africans and this has really helped me make some amazing connections in my own research. He talked about ‘the Kingdom of Grenada’ in 1492 and this I believe becomes a revelation and a key point in understanding deception. The Black Jews were used to come against the Moors and assisted the Europeans in their deception and then they were expelled, thrust out of Europe with all the Blacks [collectively called Infidels].

    Interestingly too, what he says about how the Africans went up into Spain and how the Moors established the first universities there and for about 800 years during our pre-modern times Africans had been sailing ships, this has even been admitted by the Europeans but, the problem that I can see would be that they don’t teach us this to the affect that we understand. Barashango admits too, that during that time some Blacks helped the Europeans come against other Blacks and this would be how the Europeans and the Arabs were eventually able conquer the Moors. My quest at this point though would be to re-address just WHAT BLACKS DID IN FACT COME AGAINST OTHER BLACKS IN ORDER FOR THE EUROPEANS TO CONQUER THE BLACK CIVILIZATION. And at this point I see some contradictions in the general research that we have been accustomed to embracing but actually plays a major bearing on our understanding of just what happened with certain powerful black people who had pivotal roles in ushering in a new era.

    In 1310-11, Barashango mentions Abu-Bakr II, a great Black leader. Abu-Bakr II made 400 ships and eventually went on one of the expeditions he commissioned and was never heard from again. He also speaks about the obvious presence of Blacks in the ancient records of the Aztecs and the Olmecs. But here would be one issue that needs to be readdressed concerning history and the obvious presence of the tall jet black man with gold in his braids versus the Aztecs and how they viewed the white Europeans and the Black people that were already there in the Americas. I believe that it would be us today that needs to bridge a gap in this strategic part of history during a time when the Aztecs made leagues with the White man, not only to come against the millions of Black Natives that were already indigenous to the Americas but also, towards the many incoming blacks that came there just around the time the White Supremacist Movement of whom began a predetermined plan to violently wipe out the black world and to suppress determined incoming groups into their pre-planned system of total Black enslavement. What has been overlooked would be that during this pivotal time of change there were Blacks that may have been deceived into coming against other Blacks and eventually they too became caught up into an unknowing trap. The same time period that great leaders like Abu Bakr and Mansa Musa lived, ruled and commanded ships to be built and sailed for the Americas was around the same time that deception was in the making and this part of history still has not been connected for us to fully understand.

    It was in the 1300s that Abu Bakr and the emperor of Mali, Mansa Musa ruled but also it was the same time that the Black Plague struck all of Europe and Asia upon which during that time there were major concentrations of survivors who fled Eurasia for distant countries like Africa and ‘the New World’! We need to re-look at this part of history concerning how the Arab-Muslims and many Asians were able to migrate all the way from the east and be able to settle themselves down in Northwest Africa and soon have the freedom to start their racist movements against Black people during that very time. Just how did leaders like Abu Bakr and Mansa Musa respond to these floods of foreigners who came to live amongst their people and the many other Black Muslims and Moors? How did Mansa Musa relate to them while he organized a great caravan party and journeyed eastwards across the Sudan to East Africa? Did these Black leaders and civilizations practice slavery and the enslavement of other Blacks before or after these foreigners came to Northwest Africa? Did the foreigners stock these Blacks and learn from them how to journey across North Africa towards Mecca? Did they prey upon these Black civilizations and soon set up their cultures in places like Timbuktu and also began to capture and enslave Blacks and forced march them in their caravans across North Africa to slave ports to be sold in East Africa and farther east? Would these Muslim and Moorish civilizations be the Black-on-Black mechanism executed of which became the springboard for the Red and White government to be able to launch their evil plot to rape and bereave Africa of her people and its resources? Did some of these Black leaders lead their people into a trap by making bonds with these foreigners not knowing they were being deceived? And finally, were some of these leaders flattered and encouraged to plunder their own vast resources and build these ships and then unknowingly set sail to what they would eventually find out to be an evil trap? Because I am of this generation and have studied books from great Black scholars that have paved the way before me, these are just some of the gaps I see from the past to present and these are some of the burning questions I have that I seek to find clarification about.

    History tells me that during that time of the AD 1300s and leading up to it, the Arabs and Mongols had a major civilization in the east and they traded heavily in Africa, and I wonder how they interacted with the Blacks in Africa. How did the invading Mongols in ‘the Middle East’ under the Juan [Ilkhan] Dynasty relate to the Africans? How did their Huns relate to the Africans? This would be a major gap in my educational experience. Because history tells me that it was the heavy trading even in Africa that became affected when the Black Plague struck, I wonder how the Africans responded to this time period. It was around this time too when Mansa Musa’s famous caravan crossed the Sudan that when he came to East Africa, the famous city of Egypt had become known as ‘Cairo’, a name that reflects a new kind of people who dominated this part of Africa. The name ‘Cairo’ means ‘Qa-hira’ [in Arabic] and has been translated as ‘the Victorious City’. In my opinion, it actually means ‘the city of heroes’ [Q’Hiro] and reflects an Asian influence. Finally, I feel that the answers to these questions will help us to move closer to seeing the full scale depth that the white man was willing to go to in order to deceive and dominate the world.

    [​IMG]


    Quotes: *Note--pay attention to the conflicting terms ‘servants’ versus ‘slaves’ in the different references. The definition of a ‘slave’ is distinct from ‘a servant’. It is also interesting to note that the authors that write about these Black leaders and Black people of whom supposedly died shrouded in mystery or have disappeared with no well documented and traceable records are Arabs.

    Musa made his pilgrimage in 1324, his procession reported to include 60,000 men, 12,000 slaves, heralds dressed in silks who bore gold staffs, organized horses and handled bags…Musa not only gave to the cities he passed on the way to Mecca, including Cairo and Medina, but also traded gold for souvenirs…Musa's generous actions, however, inadvertently devastated the economy of the region…When Mansa Mussa returned, he brought back many Arabian scholars and architects…The death of Mansa Musa is highly debated among modern historians and the Arab scholars who recorded history of Mali.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musa_I_of_Mali

    Between the empires of Ghana and Songhai, Mansa Musa reigned over the empire of Mali during its golden years. His control of gold mines and key cities in the Saharan trade route gave him the wealth he needed to attract the attention of the world

    Mansa Musa's famous hajj (pilgrimage) placed him in history and in the attention of the entire European and Islamic world. About the time that the Aztecs began building Tenochtitlan, the and the Ottoman Turks began the creation of their empire, Mansa Musa began his obligatory hajj to Mecca in 1324 with an impressive company. In his caravan he brought sixty-thousand people dressed in fine silk and eighty camels carrying two tons of gold. Among this throng Mansa Musa had twelve-thousand servants, five hundred of which carried staffs of gold.

    …In Cairo he gave so much gold that in Egypt its value did not recover for twelve years. Before he returned to Mali, he had given away or spent so much that he was forced to borrow money from a merchant in Cairo for his return trip.

    While most of the inhabitants of Mali were not Muslim, and although he allowed them to maintain their religious diversity…His grandfather before him had converted to Islam, and Mansa Musa established Islam as the national religion.
    http://www.hyperhistory.net/apwh/bios/b1musamansu.htm

    Mansa Musa is mostly remembered for his extravagant hajj, or pilgrimage, to Mecca with, according to the Arab historian al-Umari, 100 camel-loads of gold, each weighing 300 lbs.; 500 slaves, each carrying a 4 lb. gold staff; thousands of his subjects; as well as his senior wife, with her 500 attendants. With his lavish spending and generosity in Cairo and Mecca, he ran out of money and had to borrow at usurious rates of interest for the return trip…

    However, attention should be focused on the effects of the hajj, rather than the pilgrimage itself.

    The hajj planted Mali in men's minds and its riches fired up the imagination as El Dorado did later. In 1339, Mali appeared on a "Map of the World"…

    Mansa Musa brought back with him an Arabic library,…
    http://blackhistorypages.net/pages/mansamusa.php


    Abu Bakr II (fl. 14th century) may have been the ninth mansa of the Mali Empire. He succeeded his nephew Mansa Mohammed ibn Gao and preceded Kankou Musa I. Abubakari II appears to have abdicated his throne in order to explore "the limits of the ocean"; however, his expedition never returned.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abu_Bakr_II

    What is known about the kings of the Malian Empire is taken from the writings of Arab scholars, including Al-Umari, Abu-sa'id Uthman ad-Dukkali, Ibn Khaldun, and Ibn Battuta. Lack of reliable documentation is a serious problem in this period, and Ibn-Khaldun's comprehensive history of the Malian kings does not list Abu Bakari as a mansa of Mali.[1]

    Abu Bakari II, sometimes called Abu Bekr II or Mansa Mohammed, was one of two sons of Kolonkan, a sister of the founding emperor Sundjata Keita.[citation needed] He was the last of a mini-dynasty within the Keita clan of emperor's descending from Kolonkan. After his abdication in 1311, the Faga Laye mini-dynasty would control the empire.

    Reign
    Virtually all that is known of Abubakari II is from the scholar Al-Umari during Kankan Musa I's historic hajj to Mecca.…in 1310, the emperor financed the building of 200 vessels of men and another 200 of supplies to explore the limits of the sea that served as empire's western frontier. The mission was inconclusive, and the only information available on its fate came from a single boat whose captain refused to follow the other ships once they reached a "river in the sea" and a whirlpool…his predecessor was undeterred and launched another fleet with himself as head of the expedition. In 1311, the previous ruler temporarily ceded power to Musa,…and departed with a thousand vessels of men and a like number of supplies. After the emperor failed to return, Musa became emperor.[2]

    According to Mark Hyman, Abubakari II was interested in scholars' stories of a “gourd-shaped world, the big ocean to the west and the new world beyond that”. Hyman claims that the mansa interviewed sail-builders from Egypt and Mediterranean cities and decided to build ships on the coast of Senegambia. Hyman states that preparations for the journey included carpenters, smiths, navigators, merchants, potters, jewelers, weavers, magicians, diviners, thinkers, and the Mandinka military, and that every vessel tugged a supply-boat with food for two years, dried meat, grain, preserved fruit in ceramic jars, and gold for trade.[3] Hymans claims that key ships would communicate with drummers, and that all communications were coordinated from the leading ship of the fleet.[3][4]
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abu_Bakr_II
     
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