Black People : Do you think...?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Angela22, Jun 20, 2016.

  1. Angela22

    Angela22 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Do you think the mixing of our separate tribes causes us to be less open and accepting of each other? Less loving compared to any other ethnicity?

    I know that whites, asians, and hispanics have mixed tribes among them as well, but our mixing was forced upon us and we had to start all over again becoming a new tribe in a new land.

    Native Africans seem to take better care of one another than black Americans do of other black Americans, whether successful or in poverty.

    And as the years have gone, and more mixing brought about, black Americans seem even less likely to extend a helping hand toward each other than our ancestors have in the past.

    Why do you think that is?
     
  2. Liberty

    Liberty going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    White supremacy... Divide and conquer
     
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  3. Angela22

    Angela22 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Just to elaborate: has mixing caused us to feel less brotherly and sisterly? Make us feel as if we have little to nothing in common?
     
  4. Angela22

    Angela22 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    That seems to be the easy answer, and not that I'm saying there can't be an easy answer, but whites have conquered others as well as us, and compared to others having been conquered, we seem the most in disarray.
     
  5. Liberty

    Liberty going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Angela, I cannot begin to tell you how many times I have had to straighten white folks out when they try to tell me that my son and I are different from other AAs. I imagine that there may be some AAs that might fall for that BS.
     
  6. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    A simple and not so elaborate response, is actually a question:

    "Who is us"?

    Think about the initial question, and then consider this question... the mind will take one on an interesting carousel of thoughts.
     
  7. Angela22

    Angela22 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Lemme guess, they compliment you on how well you and your son speak English compared to the rest?:rolleyes: It's always the same.

    I do believe that there are black Americans who feel like white folks do, i.e. thinking that to be black means automatically being "ghetto" or some other nonsense like that.

    But what I'm speaking of is tribal connections, and on a more subconscious than conscious level. Do you believe that people of a kindred blood share brotherly and sisterly bonds, that even when at odds with each other, they'd do (good things) for each other? And could our tribes mixing somehow have disrupted those connections?

    I hope I'm not making this confusing. Haha.

    Just wondering others thoughts on this. :D
     
  8. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    500 yrs.jpg
     
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  9. Liberty

    Liberty going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I think the reason they say that is because they don't know any AA people except us, and the AA people they see on TV. What they think is a complement, is an insult. We are not that unique. What they are trying to say is that we are not as ignorant as they thought we were.



    We AAs have been called "The Mercedes Benz Tribe". I believe our tribal affiliations were deliberately long lost during slavery and are irrelevant today. We are all one tribe now, imo.

    I think some of the things that divide us unnecessarily are:

    Economic Status
    Educational Status
    Regionalism
    Colorism
    Cultural Roots
    Religion

    Some AAs suffer from "The Illusion of Inclusion". But, I believe, and hope, that most of us know "where we are in the mall", where our bread is buttered. I know I do. And, yes, I always give a nod to the AA people that I pass throughout my day. And, even if there was a rift between us, I'd still have their back when the chips were down.

     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2016
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  10. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    UBNaturally, my interpretation of "us" in the OP is African Americans--people of African descent, born in America. Angela, please correct me if I'm wrong.

    But taking that approach, I oftentimes wonder if we are being hyper-sensitive and hyper-critical of AAs. Are we as "bad" as we often talk about, including me? Today, I'm feeling like we need to give ourselves a pass--a pass to be who we are, living against all odds, yet still surviving, with the hope that one day soon we will begin to thrive and live in our truth.

    I don't think any issues we can name that African Americans have is due to how Black Africans were enslaved by mixing tribes. Highly intelligent, but culturally different, not even our language barriers stopped us from figuring out how to communicate with each other. We found ourselves in a common horrific situation, coming from a common continent, destined with a common fate, and basically looking pretty much alike compared to those who were slave traders.

    The experience of slavery is not just a physical condition, it's also a psychological condition. If you say you see a difference between Black Africans and African Americans in the way we treat our own, then, no matter how simple Liberty's answer might seem, it's critical to the topic of this conversation. There's just no way to escape it, even when we are inclined to think that there must be more to the story than what that says. But our ancestors were smart, they knew, that the boat ride was just the beginning. :thinking:

    Did our African ancestors learn anything else from living on a plantation, toiling in the fields, being taught how to serve people with "white" skin?

    Do you think they learned anything from the whippings, being chewed on by ravenous dogs and lynchings?

    Do you think Black men learned anything from watching Black women get raped and impregnated, beat and also lynched by white men who get feverishly excited from watching this with pure evil in their eyes?

    Do you think Black women learned anything when made to watch their babies being ripped away from them, often killed but White people began thinking it more economically feasible, to add them to their slave family and teaching babies how to bow at the feet of a white person and supposed to like it?

    What did our children learn when allowed to "play" with Massa's white children while being constantly reminded they weren't as good as their playmates?

    I wonder if field hands learned anything by watching how people like them that worked in the Big House were treated differently, and sometimes had lighter skin color. :thinking:

    What did Black slaves learn about the difference in the quality of food they were forced to eat, compared to what Massa and his family were being served, or recognizing the difference in the type of shelter they were given.

    What did they learn from the "poor white trash" they were forced to treat with more respect than other Black people?

    What did field hands learn when they saw one among them get chosen to keep the others in line and they were given a little more "freedom" than the rest because of this position?

    What do you think that Black men learned about the morals and sexual nature of White women? What did Black women learn from that, as well?

    Connect the dots. Imagine this being your way of life and your people's way of life for over 400 years! As a Black African, if I wasn't ripped from my homeland and didn't have these same experiences, would I think and behave differently? But having this experience among African Americans, embedded deep in the psyche of our people, do you think you might still see some of the affect it had on us?

    It's 2016 . . . African Americans still exist and live in America -- their "homeland." We continue to bring babies into a system that continues to oppress AAs and one that benefits people who look like slave masters. We recognize each other . . . we have a common understanding of our past and its relevance to how we think of ourselves today. African Americans don't like how we treat each other. We don't believe that we love ourselves or each other. We keep asking, why? Why can't we be more like other people and unite?

    Many of us have figured out the root to our issues. The physical condition has changed, but the psychological condition remains. It may appear as a simple answer, but sadly, it's the only answer as far as I'm concerned. Here is but a single article that speaks to what I mean:

    How Slavery’s Legacy Affects the Mental Health of Black Americans
     
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