Black People : Do You Identify With Being An African?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by phynxofkemet, Apr 28, 2008.

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Do you culturally identify with being an African, or another culture?

  1. African living off the motherland

    1 vote(s)
    20.0%
  2. American or other Diaspora culture is my primary identity

    1 vote(s)
    20.0%
  3. Identify with both cultures equally

    3 vote(s)
    60.0%
  1. phynxofkemet

    phynxofkemet Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I got into a heated argument with my sister and father this afternoon. They were discussing the young man shot 51 times and I stated that his condition was a result of being Black in Amerikkka. The reply was that two of the officers involved were also Black, to which I said that just because your skin in Black doesn't ensure that you have the consciousness, you can as one member calls it, be parading around in Black face.

    To which both of them wanted to know what made me the authority on defining Black people? And further to that, they both vehemently argued with me, and said that Blacks in America don't consider themselves African. My sister claims to know tons of Blacks in America who identify as African American, but not African. She states that the people in the U.S simply don't recognize or have anything in common with the Africans and their culture.
    I argued that she knew very little about being Black, because being an African is written into her DNA and nothing can change that. It was a matter of accepting yourself and becoming conscious of what you are. Well, that got her dander up and then things really got heated.
    I got accused of racial hatred and was called an a**hole. Ahhh, family gatherings can be so much fun, who knew? :kick: :shutup: :qqb019: :hot: :yesno:

    Anyways, I'm just curious, cuz I don't personally know tons of Black people in America, but there are a lot of people here on Destee to help settle this dispute, if only for my own personal interest.

    So the question is this, do you identify with being an African, or do you consider yourself an American (or other culture) first and foremost?
     
  2. Yardlee

    Yardlee Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I consider myself to be of African descent. I also consider myself to be African American because although genetically, I have African & Native American genes and DNA, culturally, I am American. Another reason why I consider myself American because my ancestral progenators were murdered and force into building the foundation of this country. Their blood, sweat, tears, and ultimately their bodies are in the soil of North America.

    I've had the opportunity to meet various African students at school and I can say that the women are beautiful, smart and more mature and disciplined. I haven't met many African brothers except for my mom's mechanic and shop owner.

    I think people have to define for themselves what they consider themselves to be.
     
  3. Steve69

    Steve69 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I think most identify as a African American. We have very little interest in what goes on in Africa. You can have thousands of our people in Africa killing each other and suffering and most will ignore it. We seem to just try to ignore anything in Africa.
     
  4. Each1teach1

    Each1teach1 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    IM an Afrikan!

    Ive always identified with both cultures for the same reasons that Yardley stated. However, Our culture in America is totally unique and unto itself and should be respected as such; it is just unique as those are of the blacks in the islands, SA and those of the 54 different countries with different cultures and beliefs in the motherland. Although our blood is one in the same and our cultures may share similarities with many African retentions throughout the diaspora, but our personal experiences are very different from those outside of the U.S. Alot of people cling to the notion of "going home", but have no idea what that intails. For instance, what would the reception be, would they welcome you? what would integration in the motherland be like? What country would go to? What country did ur decendants come from? How would one reconcile with the fact that much of what was home is now destroyed and continues to be so. More importantly havent even been sincere enough to study atleast one of the thousands of african languages or cultures. Now when I was in undergrad I made it a point that as a Pan Africanist I would learn atleast two african languages and I did, Swahili and Fulani. I also made it a point to familiarize myself with some african cultures and traditions which I am still learning because there are so many. On a side note I alot of west africans went to my school and they were very good peoples. I made very good friends as a result youd be very interested in what they had to say on this whole migration back to the motherland.
     
  5. phynxofkemet

    phynxofkemet Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Ahh, I can admit I was wrong

    It seems I was wrong... oh she will love this! Thanks for the feedback. And really very important points mentioned. I personally had to vote for identifying with both equally because it bothers me to hear people speak of Canadians like they're all Caucasian or Aboriginal. I have contributed and been influened by being here just as much as others with lighter of darker skin, and that's because I'm born and raised here. However, my ancestry is part African and nothing I can ever do will change that it calls to me, wanting me to know that part of myself. So, thanks again for answering this lil ole question. You've opened my mind wider.
     
  6. Each1teach1

    Each1teach1 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    question are your family's roots in canada? is there a big diff between America and being there?
     
  7. phynxofkemet

    phynxofkemet Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Roots

    Yes, my father's children and one of his brothers raised his children in Canada. I've had the opportunity to travel to some of the U.S (Montana, NY, NJ, Washington, Washington D.C, Philly, California) and yes the cultural differences are quite remarkable.

    If I may generalize for a minute:
    • Canadians are vocally quieter in public,
    • Canadians are less likely to protest or get actively involved in politics
    • Canadian television and media isn't the same at all, much of what you see on cable we only get on additional tiers / subscriptions. Most of what I see on the t.v is 95% white people and white tv programs.
    • Canada seems environmentally cleaner, with our many of our cities having less freeways.
    • Racism in Canada is sometimes more subtle and can be quite dangerous because you have to be in the know to recognize it
    • Unless you live in Montreal or Toronto, there are not a lot of public services open after 11 p.m. including restaurants.
    • There is statistically less violence per capita in Canada
    • There are a lot less people per sq km, so there's generally more breathing space
    • With exapansion on smaller cities and booms, this may change, but traditionally, Toronto, and East Vancouver, were known for having really poor quality housing in some areas, otherwise in the city you don't see huge project housing like you do in some urban cities in America. Instead people just end up homeless!
    • Canadian education is different, and it seems that unless your family has a decent amount of money in the U.S a fair education is more challenging to get. We don't have metal detectors, and quite as much violence on school grounds.
    • Although we don't treat the Aboriginal people very well here either, they do seem to progress better than in the U.S and have a higher visibility
    • Addictions to illegal substances here come at a different pace than in the U.S
      I am now witnessing more crack heads here in the city than ever before, and from what I understand that crisis is coming to an end in the U.S (I could be wrong on that, it's just what I've heard)
    • We spend less money on our atheletes
    • We have no game shows or major reality based t.v programs
    • Much of what is considered XXX in the U.S is censored as pornography in Canada. You can still get it, but it falls under different importation rules
    That's just a sample, to name a few.
     
  8. Ionlyspeaktruth

    Ionlyspeaktruth Banned

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    Kidnapped AFRIKAN! One who feels the pain and hears the cries of his ancestors and will NEVER seek to couple with or befriend the offshoot of his tormentors! Period. I will not DISGRACE the 1,000,000,000 AFRIKANS slaughterd by the creature that walks on 2 feet.:10200:
     
  9. naija-man

    naija-man Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    But what they said is slighty true....SOME black dont consider themselves African

    There are those from/born &raised in Africa who may call those born outside of Africa i.e 1st/2nd generation Africans in Europe/USA...."British" "American" and so on.....

    Yes, it is in ur DNA, but it doesn't automatically mean U will FEEL African.
    They have spent their lives in America, and so the identity of African-american has been stitched into them, it's not really their fault....they can't totally identify with a place they have not been to. as harsh as this may sound some Africans in Africa may not consider some folks who are Caribbean or African-american as AFRICANS, or if dey do...they are "diluted"...
    but yes, no matter what they & you are AFRICANS.


    If U raised hen amongst ducks, what it will feel, and what it is are two different things.
     
  10. Bootzey

    Bootzey Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I consider myself an American. Though no one else will. My family goes back 10 generations in the US. Any other group that can claim that, is considered American. Just because I happen to be melanin-ated I have to be considered African American? No. Irish people don't call themselves Irish-Americans, Italians don't call themselves Italian-Americans when they have been here as long as I/we have. They just get to be Americans. I'm taking my title. Quantify yours if you want.

    I've seen Africans check the "other" box on applications way more than a little bit. If they don't want to identify with me, then I don't want to identify with them.

    Just my opinion,
    Peace
     
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