Black People : Do Asians/Indians, Arabs & Latinos celebrate Dr. King & the Civil Rights Movement?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by panafrica, Feb 17, 2004.

  1. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Since the creation of the United States of America in the late 1700s, it has been known as the "Land of Opportunity". Even as a British colony in the 1600s, the USA had a reputation as a place to escape poverty and religious persecution. However until the 1970s, the "Opportunity" which existed in America was only available to white people. Not surprisingly, the majority of immigration which existed in America prior to the 1970s, came from Europe. The only non-white people in America prior to the 1970s were African slaves and their descendants. The native Amerindians, who were relegated to reservations by the late 1800s. There were a handful of Chinese, Japanese, and Mexicans in America. However most of these people were brought over as laborers to work on railroads in the West, during the late 1800s. While the only bar to equal treatment for "ethnic" Europeans (Germans, Italians, Greeks, etc.) was their ability to speak English. Non-White Americans were subjected to Slavery & Apartheid (calling Jim Crow what it really was).

    SInce the early 1900s African American fought to bring an end to Aparheid. This was evident through the legal battles of the NAACP, and writing campaigns like Ida B Well's Anti-Lynching articles. Several lawsuits in the early 1900s would set the ground work for the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s & 60s. During these years, the protest, the lawsuits, the blood spilled by African Americans like: Rosa Parks, Dr. Martin Luther King, Fannie Lou Hamer, Medgar Evers, (and to many others to mention) brought a end to American Apartheid. By the 1970s it was no longer legal to discriminate in America based on one's race, color, creed, religion, or national origin. America was now truly a land of opportunity for
    all people. Not surprisingly since the 1970s the numbers of Asian, Arab, Indian, and Latino (from all over South America & the Spanish Caribbean), immigrants to the US have numbered in the millions.

    Non-black "ethnic" minorities have benefited greatly from the African American inspired and fought Civil Rights Movement. Many people might argue that they have benefited more than African Americans. Yet how many of these people celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King's birthday? Why do I only see African Americans (and occasionally a white intergrationalist) giving TV interviews about what Dr. King means to them? Why are there no Asian, Arab, Indian, or Latino stores with a picture of Dr. King? Do they appreciate that it literally took the spilling of black blood for non-white people to have rights in America? Do they realize what the Civil Rights Movement did for them? If the answer to all of these questions is NO, then what do we do about it?
     
  2. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Where I am, trust me, ALL racial/ethnic groups, including white people know about it because it's one of my responsibilities to make sure they do. Now, whether they give a hoot, that's another story. I've seen some that do and many that don't. But what they think doesn't concern me as much as the things each group of people might do to hinder the ability for African Americans to achieve their goals because as many of you well know, if a fight for civil rights is around, African Americans are in the midst of it and leading the charge.

    There is a saying and it's true because I witness it happening that the "squeeky wheel always gets the grease." At the present time, the LGBT community is squeeling very loudly and getting a great deal of attention when it comes to civil rights issues.

    But PA, you ask, do other racial/ethnic groups (including white women) know or realize what African Americans have done for them in terms of civil rights? To put it simply, yes, they are very well aware. But that doesn't mean that they are going to pay tribute to us or align themselves with us. Added to the injustices in this country is an interesting phenomenon called RACISM and it has a special impact on African Americans that people of other racial/ethnic groups don't want any part of. So they are careful in their association with us. Be close enough to reap the benefits of our efforts but far enough away not to be seen as political empathizers. But this doesn't surprise me because that's what a RACIST system perpetuates and banks on. Every group that has voluntarily come to America demanding equal rights, has studied the Civil Rights Movement spearheaded by African Americans, adopted their strategy, and pushed their own SEPARATE agenda because no one wants it as bad as African Americans get so they will stay as far away from us as possible even to the tune of appearing liberal on the outside but racist on the inside. To them, it's not 'justice', it's JUST US, because after all, as you described it, America is the "LAND OF OPPORTUNITY."

    Peace :spinstar:
     
  3. angelicsage

    angelicsage Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Sister NNQueen...excellent perspective...I applaud you for this statement,
    In my opinion, you summarized the answer to this question with these particular words.
     
  4. shaneak

    shaneak Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I'm backing angel on this one.. you hit that right on the nose NNQueen... but we still have that question... What do we do about it? or is their anything we can do about it? Our protest have kept us at a stand still for some time now. And our benefits have been given as well as recognized by others. Have the Land of Opportunity focused so much on immigration and opportunity that they forgot about the base of our issues that have not been resolved? Have we not enough to speak up on our behalf or are they just trying to stay in office? How do we evolve.. for i haven't seen how we have(fully as people).. maybe a little but not a great deal. based on percentage. Has anyone read the Willie Lynch Speech? Please do... interesting perspective written back in the late 17"or early 1800's. The training of a negro slave compared to the training or breaking in of a wild horse. I don't know about anyone else.. but i come from a small hick town.. and it fits that society.. perfectly. And thats some serious(negative) influence.
     
  5. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    In light of the discussion in the Black Slave Owner Thread, I thought this is another topics which can be brought back.
     
  6. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Excellent posts everyone. I'm with you 100% on this one Y'all :peace:
     
  7. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I don't know why it took me so long to answer this thread. However I asked the question already knowing the answer was No! My purpose was not to encourage other "minorities" to pay homage to African Americans, instead it was to make us aware of the danger of involving outsiders in our struggle.
     
  8. will-he-write

    will-he-write Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I seriously doubt if they do respect our martyrs , because we don't truly respect our martyrs. Here it has been 39 years since Malcolm X was assassinated, 36 years since Dr. King was assassinated and most of the people that they lost their lives for don't know who did it!!! We get's no respect from no one until we respect ourselves!!!
     
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