Black People : DISSECTING THE EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION

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  1. One9_Arch

    One9_Arch Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    THE EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION
    By the President of the United States of America
    January 1, 1863​


    A Proclamation.

    Whereas, on the twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, a proclamation was issued by the President of the United States, containing, among other things, the following, to wit:

    "That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom. (Emphasis added)

    "That the Executive will, on the first day of January aforesaid, by proclamation, designate the States and parts of States, if any, in which the people thereof, respectively, shall then be in rebellion against the United States; and the fact that any State, or the people thereof, shall on that day be, in good faith, represented in the Congress of the United States by members chosen thereto at elections wherein a majority of the qualified voters of such State shall have participated, shall, in the absence of strong countervailing testimony, be deemed conclusive evidence that such State, and the people thereof, are not then in rebellion against the United States."

    Now, therefore I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Commander-in-Chief, of the Army and Navy of the United States in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and in accordance with my purpose so to do publicly proclaimed for the full period of one hundred days, from the day first above mentioned, order and designate as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit:

    Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, (except the Parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James Ascension, Assumption, Terrebonne, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the City of New Orleans) Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia, (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Ann, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth[)], and which excepted parts, are for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued.

    And by virtue of the power, and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States, and parts of States, are, and henceforward shall be free; and that the Executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons. (Emphasis added)

    And I hereby enjoin upon the people so declared to be free to abstain from all violence, unless in necessary self-defense; and I recommend to them that, in all cases when allowed, they labor faithfully for reasonable wages. (Emphasis added)

    And I further declare and make known, that such persons of suitable condition, will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service.

    And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution, upon military necessity, I invoke the considerate judgment of mankind, and the gracious favor of Almighty God.

    In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

    Done at the City of Washington, this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the eighty-seventh.

    By the President: Abraham Lincoln
    William H. Seward, Secretary of State.


    As-Salaam Alaikum:

    The only thing lacking is a conscious decision on the part of Our people to exercise the freedom, as opposed to “freedoms” (i.e., rights/privileges of citizenship) guaranteed Us by the laws governing the United States of America. But there’s a catch. Just as the afore-quoted document was openly declared, so to must We openly proclaim Ourselves free. The problem We face is one of isolation through ignorance and division. The sheep that strays from the rest of the flock, and dares to voice unpopular opinions, makes itself a victim—a mark to be preyed upon. The United States government has “display[ed] an enduring tendency to silence, or to facilitate silencing, those voices that it disapproves.” [see Arkansas Writers’ Project, Inc. V. Ragland, 481 U.S. 221, 235 (1987)]. Whether through threats of violence, incarceration, or murder, American history is marked bloody with Black men and women who dared to speak truth in the midst of so much Wickedness. We find this unacceptable! So, it gives Us great pleasure to issue the following Decree.

    The Office of the Prime Minister has had the opportunity to analyze and dissect the Emancipation Proclamation issued on January 1, 1863. Those portions to which We place emphasis weigh heavy on the hearts of Our people. Wherefore, on this 6th day of September, 2007, We issue a proclamation of Our own. The following Divine Decree shall be effective immediately:

    By the authority vested in the Office of the Prime Minister, I, Abdul Muhammad, do hereby proclaim all current and future members of the Order of Shabazz (i.e., all registered Speakers of the General Assembly), to be free to exercise their rights as established and promulgated in the Order’s Constitution.

    We recognize as valid Mr. Lincoln’s declaration that “all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State” was (in 1863), thenceforward, and forever free.” We also agree with Mr. Lincoln’s decision to enjoin upon the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authorit[ies]:”


    1. A duty to recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons (i.e., the American so-called negro as Our Messenger often referred to the descendants of America’s enslaved Black masses) and;
    2. An injunction against all acts of repression by either the Executive Office of the President, or the military powers thereof. We understand this to mean the United States government is precluded from even attempting to restrain, prevent, or inhibit Us from realizing the “actual freedom” Our forefathers were guaranteed in the afore-quoted Emancipation Proclamation.

    This was a wise decision considering Our proclivity to seek Shabasian Justice for actions against the Tribe.

    Mr. Lincoln continued. “And I hereby enjoin [urge] upon the people so declared to be free to abstain from [that is, restrain oneself from doing or indulging in] all violence, unless in necessary self-defense ... and I recommend to them that, in all cases when allowed, they labor faithfully for reasonable wages.” This recommendation was found acceptable to Our forefathers, and prudence dictates that the Order follow the path laid in the blood of Our predecessors. As such, We too accept Abraham Lincoln’s recommendation, for now.

    Salaam
     
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