Black People : DAY OF REFLECTION.....HAMMER TIME!!!

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by happy69, Jan 27, 2004.

  1. happy69

    happy69 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 3, 2002
    Messages:
    617
    Likes Received:
    5
    Ratings:
    +5
    Piggy backing off of Destee’s question of who in Unity to exclude and Queen’s Black Conservative question…

    [U]The Lessons of (MC) Hammer[/U]


    I have said it a million times, but here goes a million and one: Those people who are “in” OUR community, like O.J. Simpson, Michael Jackson, Kobe Bryant, Snoop Doggy Dog, Michael Jordan amongst others should not even be a blip on OUR map - as a community. And I guess I better answer the question that is going to come up; Am I saying that Black Entertainers OWE something to the Black Community? No,………… and Yes.
    Yes, because today, WE are all, still feeding off of the blood of OUR Fore Parents…So, in that aspect, YES, All of US owe regardless of station in life.

    The way I see it is like this:
    O.J. was an improved version of Jim Brown (back to him a little later); Michael Jackson was an improved version of James Brown, Michael Jordan was an improved version of Dr. J… Snoop recouped from Sugar Hill Gang… and of course WE can go all the way back… Blacks pave the road for other Blacks, etc…

    There should not have to be a demand upon them to love the Black Community; it is incumbent upon us as a community to decide what our relation to those in entertainment will and should be? If anything.

    I like Oprah as a brand. A brand that for a large proportion of her beginnings, was the explicit exploitation of the Black Community-- (Yes, before she became the goody-goody queen, she was in the “trash” too.)
    And just by her omission of Blacks during those times, whenever she did a positive show; perpetuated the stereotype that Blacks had nothing good going on (and boasted about not paying them for the demonization); truthfully, it has only been a recent phenomenon (last 2-3 years) that she has realized that hey, there are Black American professionals; Black Americans with big houses that need remodeling, decorating; that there are Black American Angels who love and give to their Community and their people; There are Black Americans in love with each other and raising healthy, happy families… And let’s be honest that was a beautiful gift; 5 million dollars she gave, by her lonesome to Morris Brown.

    We have to learn how not to be co-opted and if WE are WE have to decide what, if anything, WE will get from it .

    We still talking about O.J.; still waiting on his love. Still defending him. He forgot US. He even forgot his family. Picked up a girl who didn’t even finish high school, and took care of her and her whole family. O.J. may or may not be a murderer; I don’t know. In Majority America he is. He still taking care of them; while WE are still paying for him. How? Now there is an over zealousness to judge and convict Blacks who may be wealthy because they did it and they are going to get away with it--the beast!

    Michael Jordan always did and will continue to distance himself from the Black Community-- but When White America went after him, it was US who was hollering about his being mistreated; it was US driving cross-country, paying respects for his father’s death… Michael Jackson is doing the same….. So is Kobe, etc…

    Yet, I have not once heard anybody talk about those Blacks who use their “power” (however that power may be deemed) and USE it to somehow help up.

    Danny Glover? Uses his voice; speaks on many many issues; and not just for OUR community. And he pays for it. Why are we not protesting for him?

    Kenny Gamble? In PA he had to put up, and did, the matching funds to rebuild and refurbish building so that those in OUR community could have decent housing.

    Charles Mann? The brother is bad. He isn’t afraid to love US and Openly and help.

    Warwick Dunn? Gives love, respect and hope to the Sisters (and again, not just Black) out there doing it alone. Makes the down payment and gives the keys to new houses.

    And many others, how about we talk about them; how about we give our Love energy that we are wasting on those who use it and abuse it and show no return for it- on them?

    Hammer paved the way for every Rapper and Hip Hopper who came after. He showed how it could be done. He showed how big it could be. He took the community with him literally and figuratively…. And they used and abused him. What was the familiar refrain, something Jordan likes to say about us, “You just can’t help some folks…” Meaning, don’t give a **** about the beasts. When he was beaten, because of his love, WE forgot about him, called him Stupid. But, what could have happened if, just some of OUR entertainers were like him?
    I PROPOSE THAT WE ENACT A HAMMER DAY OF REFLECTION
    (for all those in OUR community who really do give a ****)
     
  2. Akilah

    Akilah Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2003
    Messages:
    1,346
    Likes Received:
    33
    Occupation:
    Scheduling Coordinator for large Health System
    Location:
    Da' Gump
    Ratings:
    +36
    I second that motion :court:
    Keep speakin' those hard truths
    :teach:
    One day WE will get it ...


    Much Peace,
    Akilah :spinstar:
     
  3. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2001
    Messages:
    6,379
    Likes Received:
    1,434
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +1,869
    Sister Akilah, am I being too optimistic or unrealistic when I propose that the one day that you mentioned has arrived? Knowledge is the key but what you do with it is what gives you the power. I think we do get it, many of us do anyway, but we have to stop being afraid to come together to fight for what we want. We've been conditioned for so long to think that congregating together is bad because we must be plotting to overthrow the power structure. We're met with suspicion and hostility whenever a group of us gets together outside of a social affair. We've been dealt punishment after punishment over time for fighting against oppression.

    Sister happy69 makes a very good point about unity and she's right, we do focus more on people who are celebrity status and tend to exhibit a lofty air of elitism about them. Not to say that some aren't somewhat generous with their money or that they don't do some things to support certain aspects of our community, but I think we expect to see and hear something more or different from them. We are victims of the tabloid industry by always fiending for information about the few in front of the cameras and knowing very little about others who are doing more to directly help uplift our people and build our communities. Happy69, thank you for the list you posted!

    Recognize that there will always be some who will bite the hand that feeds them. It's a given. But you'll never know this unless you reach out to help. It's not just about money and giving it away. Like Sister Happy wrote, there are other things we can contribute that are just as valuable and often moreso. Teaching self-sufficiency, dependability and how to be responsible. Teaching critical thinking skills and technical skills can be uplifting. Teaching the real value of a dollar and how to dream and ways to pursue those dreams can be freeing. Teaching how to serve and help others, to give back, to share and support each other . . . will set us free.

    Queenie :spinstar:
     
  4. Akilah

    Akilah Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2003
    Messages:
    1,346
    Likes Received:
    33
    Occupation:
    Scheduling Coordinator for large Health System
    Location:
    Da' Gump
    Ratings:
    +36
    No I wouldn't say that... perhaps idealistic would be a better choice of word, But Sister Queenie that is precisely what our people will need in order to thrive and take our rightful place in the world community.

    As a people we desperately need to revisit some of our long held ideals such as the concept
    of the village. Accountability was key. Children and young folk were expected to be respectful of their elders and well behaved. Not only did their parents see to this but so did the other adults residing in the neighborhood. If Mrs Johnson spotted you cutting the fool while you were outside playing, she was pre-authorized to "correct" you on the spot and send you home to your Mother - calling ahead to inform her of the incident. Once you arrived home more "correction" was waiting. If Mrs. Johnson tried to chastise a child today that same child would likely "tell her where to get off" and so would her parents.

    Neighbors were not strangers back in those days. They were extended family members who could depend on each other for a helping hand. Whether it was the afore mentioned watchfulness of each others children, carpooling to work, church and market, or sharing resources such as gathering at the home of the neighbor who had the TV to view history in the making : The first moon walk or perhaps Jackie Robinson breaking the color barriers in baseball. To find such unity in a neighborhood these days is quite rare, but admittedly it does exist in isolated pockets.

    It has been argued that desegregation has been the main culprit in the loosening of our ideals. Divide and conquer. Before desegregation our children were taught by black teachers who really seemed to put their whole heart and soul into not only instruction on reading , writing , and arithmetic but also on self worth and discipline . Good grades and citizenship were a mark of pride and greatly celebrated in school and in the greater community. Now a days children that strive for greatness in academia and community service are often marked as nerds or "not cool" by their peers and ostracized.

    Before desegregation there seemed to be more diverse black owned businesses : doctors, dentists, green grocers, butchers, druggists, floral shops. Probably because there were more black owned banks to obtain loans from. In these days, unless it's a rib shack or a beauty salon/barber shop, often times black owned businesses fail in short order due to the fact that we as a people do not support our black entrepreneurs. Some will cite the high prices while others, sadly, will allow their own feelings of envy and jealousy to get the better of them and keep them from patronizing these establishments... "Uhhh.. who does she think she is ??!!" or "Oh he thinks he's all that now..." Why do we laud the mega wealth of a P. Diddy or Oprah yet refuse to openly and heartily embrace the folk in our own back yard that are trying to find success and make a difference in a smaller , yet no less effective, way ?

    So Sister Queenie I do agree with you that, yes , we have the ability to work together as a people to empower our modern day community. We just need to be MORE idealistic . Go above and beyond the mark. But in order to have what we once had we must be WILLING to do what we once did . Besides the precious few as mentioned by Happy69, are we as a community WILLING ? Only time will tell ...

    Much Peace,
    Akilah :spinstar:
     
  5. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2001
    Messages:
    6,379
    Likes Received:
    1,434
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +1,869
    Excellent response. Thank you, Sister Akilah!

    Queenie :spinstar:
     
  6. happy69

    happy69 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 3, 2002
    Messages:
    617
    Likes Received:
    5
    Ratings:
    +5
    Thank you both....for taking the time and thinking on the issue.

    The list is to show that there are those in the entertainment community who do care and are proud african-americans.

    Sis'Queen did write something that made me pause; when she said that We are afraid to get together because WE (too) feel that it is a meeting to overthrow the government.

    At first thought; I want to say; that is so **** stupid of US; but I have not thought of it like that, and I am a bit taken aback, to be honest and I want to really take out time and ponder it.
    Do WE operate in fear?

    Anyway, thanks I hope that WE can really discuss this...really, and indept, and come to some agreement on WHAT WE can do as a community.

    I do believe that WE are starting to exhibit a new UNITY...but in that developement WE defend those that WE should not.
     
  7. Akilah

    Akilah Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2003
    Messages:
    1,346
    Likes Received:
    33
    Occupation:
    Scheduling Coordinator for large Health System
    Location:
    Da' Gump
    Ratings:
    +36
    Thank you to my Sister Happy69 &
    Sister Queenie for that mini Black
    Think Tank !!!! I just love it when our
    people can come together and dialogue
    about issues near and dear to our :heart:'s
    that affect our entire community. It gives
    me great hope and inspiration!!!

    Much Peace and Love,
    Akilah :spinstar:
     
  8. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2001
    Messages:
    6,379
    Likes Received:
    1,434
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +1,869
    Sister Happy69, you know you have comrades here. Our approaches may differ, but I think our purpose and goals are the same. This discussion is far from being over, regardless of whether it continues here or in other threads. We will persist!

    Peace :heart:
     
  9. happy69

    happy69 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 3, 2002
    Messages:
    617
    Likes Received:
    5
    Ratings:
    +5
    Thanks Sisters. I know that We can do this.

    I hope We do.

    Henry Louis Gate's ; America, Behind The Colorline will air on Feb. 3 and 4.
    Collin Powell has an interesting thesis on Our Responsibility to each other.
    Russell Simmons has some interesting thoughts too.

    Russell Simmons perpetuated some of the ills that the Rap game came to incorporate...that is just a fact. But, he has taken that wealth and he is doing some good for the community; in my mind anyway. So, where do we put people like him? Should we look at him like Rockafeller, etc... criminals who took their fortunes and turned them into something good?

    Sean Puffy Combs? Who has stated that it is his duty to reach back.

    Are WE, do WE operate under, "misery loves company" dichtome?
    or what OUR folkes like to call crab in the barrell status---we cannot stand to see one get up or have more... I'm only speaking in generalities. Do We?
     
  10. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2001
    Messages:
    6,379
    Likes Received:
    1,434
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +1,869
    Interesting question...hmmm

    Happy69 wrote:

    "Russell Simmons perpetuated some of the ills that the Rap game came to incorporate...that is just a fact. But, he has taken that wealth and he is doing some good for the community; in my mind anyway. So, where do we put people like him? Should we look at him like Rockafeller, etc... criminals who took their fortunes and turned them into something good?"

    For some reason I'm looking at this like a mathematical equation: positives increase and negatives decrease. So if we look at this on a social scale starting at zero, if Russell Simmons perpetuated some of the ills that the Rap game came to incorporate, then I would view that as a negative. All things being equal, if he turned around and used the wealth he gained from those negative activities and did something positive to the good of the Black community, although that would advance us socially, wouldn't that simply bring us back to zero? So, in essence, we haven't advanced at all, we've actually stood still. What has to be measured then is the impact of what Simmons has done on the Black community. Do the negatives cancel out the positives or vice versa?

    Should Simmons be admired for the good things he does even though his ability to do those things was made possible by some not so good things? How would this or he compare to someone who earned and used their wealth in positive ways? Does it make what Simmons does equally good or should he be held accountable for the error of his ways?

    What happens if the way wealth is made leaves social casualities in the wake of their activity? If some rap music sends negative messages and some people take it seriously and learn to believe it, can they always be saved in the end when the artists contradict their money-making messages later?

    Why aren't positive activities valued as much as those activities we might think are harmful to us--or are they?

    Queenie :spinstar:
     
Loading...