Black Money Business Jobs : Couple Vacations on $24,000 A Year

Discussion in 'Black Money Business Jobs' started by soulsearcher, Dec 7, 2005.

  1. soulsearcher

    soulsearcher Banned MEMBER

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    <<
    A PRICELESS RETIREMENT

    http://money.aol.com/fool/investing/canvas3?id=20051130130609990001

    By Billy and Akaisha Kaderli

    Some say it's impossible. Others simply dismiss the notion outright even if they are curious. How do we live on $24,000 per year while traveling through New Zealand, The West Indies, Laos, and other exotic locations? We don't give up luxury, nor do we deprive ourselves. So what is our secret?


    Our approach is very simple: We have chosen not to dedicate our time and money to support a complicated infrastructure.


    Over the past 12 months, we have lived in Ecuador, the U.S., and Thailand and also bought a new computer and a digital camera. On approximately $24,000.


    We have spent considerably more in some years than in others. However, on average, over the past 15 years of our early retirement, our figures have fallen in this range.


    How is it possible? From the graph below, you will see a listing of categories in which we track our spending, with the percentages based on our actual spending from Nov. 1, 2004, to Oct. 31, 2005. We want to clarify that we do not budget but rather operate from the position that we are not conspicuous consumers. (Keep in mind that the $24,000 is net per year, not gross. This amount reflects our actual spending, not a paycheck amount from which taxes and savings must be drawn.) >>



    This is an interesting article I came across on AOL.

    I apologize ahead of time because the couple is not black, but the topics focused on in this article are too important to ignore.

    The one thing that it should've added though is the importance of PAYING OFF CREDIT CARD DEBT. Even if you're a millionaire, if your amount of debt supercedes your income then you'll never be able to maintain financial freedom.

    The article also doesn't talk about how important it is to try to pay off your house as soon as you can. So if you have extra money, try putting it towards the principle. Even if it's $100 here, $100 there... it adds up over time.

    But besides that, I think it brings up some good points on learning how to live well on a small amount of money.
     
  2. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    What are you apologizing for? An investment opportunity is an investment opportunity. If there is an opportunity (legal) for black folks to make money, I don't care how they do it. My only concern is what is done with money after it is obtained.
     
  3. Billy

    Billy New Member MEMBER

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    Hello,

    My name is Akaisha Kaderli -- from the Priceless Retirement commentary mentioned here. I wanted to thank you for posting it here.

    I checked your rules to see if I would be offending anyone by responding to this post, since I am not black. There were no rules as such, but perhaps that is implied. If so, I will be expecting an email to tell me to 'cease and desist...'

    However, I did want to say that your comments about paying off credit card debt is well taken. Actually, we lived our lives not incurring credit card debt. Yes, we had a mortgage, a business loan and we bought cars, but we did not incur consumer debt, as a way of life. We paid off any credit card charges within the 30 day billing cycle.

    We also paid down on our mortgage aggressively. At the time, we were told we were 'nuts' for doing so -- no one we knew was doing this. However, when we sold our house, we had that equity socked away.

    I sincerely wish you all the best and in every way. I would be happy to answer questions, or contribute, but I don't know where to go from here.

    If I am 'not allowed' to be here, that's ok too.

    Just trying to be of service.

    Sincerely,
    Akaisha
     
  4. karmashines

    karmashines Banned MEMBER

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    I notice you said you didn't accumulate a lot of consumer debt... what are your suggestions for people that have?

    And is there an age that would be 'too young' to consider retiring early?

    Also, how did you find out about Destee.com?
     
  5. Billy

    Billy New Member MEMBER

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    I would suggest a couple of things.

    First - stop debting right now. Just stop. I know this might feel painful, but if you have debt, and are paying off credit cards plus have the interest to pay, it's a long, hard road to continue walking down. It won't end, unless the debting stops.

    Secondly - Consolidate your debts if you can and aggressively pay them off.

    Thirdly - Begin right now, and simplify your 'personal infrastructure'. This might also initially feel painful, as America is a consumer society. Cutting back or slimming down expenses has a lot of negative connotations to it. (like we are 'poor' instead of we are in control of our finances... see what I mean?)

    'Personal infrastructure' means -- what are you paying for housing? transport? (insurances for that transport?) What is your tax structure? How many subscriptions are you paying for? (Cable, lots of mobile phones, magazines, gym memberships, etc.)

    Basically, if you are working to pay for a high maintenance personal infrastructure, you will never get out from under it.

    4th - Assertively begin to save from your income. Pay yourself (and your future) first.

    We retired at the age of 38, and we didn't think it was too young. Being retired doesn't mean you sit around waiting for the undertaker. Nor does it mean you sit around and do nothing. It means you are financially independent, and can choose what you want to do with your time.

    Being young and 'retired' allows you the energy and enthusiasm of youth to direct your contributions to society. -- soo... No, I don't think any age is 'too young' if you know what you want to do with your time.

    My husband, Billy, has a 'Google Alert' out on our names. Obviously, we wrote a book and are selling it ourselves. We also have a travel and information website. These Google alerts let us know if/when someone is talking about us, or if we can contribute in any way to helping people become financially independent, and live the life of their choosing.

    Someone here mentioned us, we got the alert, and I humbly applied for membership.

    I would like to contribute helpful information - I realize this is not a selling site. I do not want to offend or convert anyone to a life of simplicity.

    We wish you the very best. Hope the above information helps clarify your situation. To find us, you can always Google our names to find our site.

    Sincerely,
    Akaisha
     
  6. karmashines

    karmashines Banned MEMBER

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    I've been able to stop debting, (for the most part) but I have qualms about debt consolidation. I have heard that credit card companies don't like to see that on your credit report, so that's been the main thing that's kept me from using those types of services.

    I figure even paying only the minimum on my credit cards I have about 5 years before all are paid off at this rate. I would be around 29. So I feel even more uneasy because it's not 'that long' before everything is paid off.

    As far as Google Alerts.. that's a good piece of information to know, especially for online entrepreners.
     
  7. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Billy ... Hello and Welcome ... :wave:

    No, you are not offending anyone by joining and posting here. As you've read our rules, as long as you abide by them, you're always welcome. Thanks for sharing the information you have thus far.

    I have a question. Since you are not Black, what are you? If you don't mind sharing.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  8. Billy

    Billy New Member MEMBER

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    Karmashines said:
    Dear Karma,
    You know, I personally know nothing of that preference by credit card companies. You might try to research that so you know definitively, and not just by hearsay. Meanwhile, I will ask my husband, as his training is in the financial field, and he knows numbers.

    Try and get that point clarified for yourself. Better to know for sure, than to think you know, and spend 5 years of emotional and financial energy on a false premise. :shades: Maybe you could Google a search, -- or better yet, try asking on a financial forum.

    (Am I allowed to say this Destee? -- go to our website and click on Preferred Links -- there are financial forums listed, no cost to join, and do a search in the archives with keywords. Or better yet, start your own thread. Helpful people there...)

    .

    Exactly. The digital world and all it offers is amazing.

    Destee said:

    Thank you!

    No problem. Am happy to help. My husband and I think that financial education should start in the schools. No one teaches us simple money techniques or skills. It's a crying shame, really...

    Oh, I don't mind sharing at all.. ! You know, I have always considered myself to be a 'spirit/soul' first. I am a person who happens to be in a woman's body.. and that body has a heritage. I don't primarily define myself by race - and my husband and I travel so extensively (we are called PT's - Perpetual Travelers) and we have seen and interacted with so many combinations that I totally forget about it on a day to day experience.

    We have seen every hair color, every tooth and nose shape, every height, with arms and legs, no arms and legs, every skin color and weight. (!!)

    To be honest, I look at the eyes and feel the heart.

    But to answer your question directly -- My father's heritage was from Italy. His folks came over on the boat in the early 1900's with nothing but willingness and determination for a better life. He was first generation born American, I am second.

    My Mom's heritage came from Germany/Austria and her folks also came over on the boat in the early 1900's. They had no money either, but had fierce determination and focus. She is first generation born American, and I am second.

    In my view, we all have plusses, we all have challenges. It's what we do with them that makes the difference.

    Respectfully and thank you,
    Akaisha
     
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