Black People : Cops expose NYPD's Stop and Frisk Program ... A Must See Documentary !

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by PurpleMoons, Oct 10, 2012.

  1. PurpleMoons

    PurpleMoons Administrator STAFF

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    Published on Oct 10, 2012 by nycresistance
    "An Inside Look at the NYPD's Stop-and-Frisk Policy. A secret audio recording of a stop-and-frisk in action sheds unprecedented light on a practice that has put the city's young people of color in the NYPD's crosshairs." - Ross Tuttle






    :heart:
     
  2. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

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    peace

    This 'stop & frisk' is absolutely off the hook. They mainly target young h.s. kids with thier school back packs on and young brothers walking alone at night carrying any type of bag. I actually think the nypd is trying to incite a riot because that's exactly what's going to happen. It's about to go back to the old fort apache days, when the police couldn't even enter certain sections of the bronx, so they called their precinct a Fort, meaning it's them against the savages.

    [​IMG]


    The movie 'Fort Apache the Bronx' was the east coast version of the movie 'Colors'. The people actually protested because it was such a disrespectful depiction.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. PurpleMoons

    PurpleMoons Administrator STAFF

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    DAT ISH CRAY!

    I can picture that happening! I know when i watched this documentary i felt touch by the fire!
    For a moment i wanted to just blow something up!
    Some people are so rotten in their souls it makes me wanna... *explicit terminology*

    :em1500:
     
  4. Asomfwaa

    Asomfwaa Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    It's ironic that you put up "Dat Ish Cray" and "blow something up" because the "racial-profiling" is also a "cultural profiling;" the culture being the degrading Hip Hop music of today.

    The Hip Hop music, as it were, incites violence (or at least self-destruction)--and 'blow something up'--is the response Policeman seek to spark. I.e. two qualities that can get you in the easiest trouble are exhibited in this one post.

    Granted "going along to get along" isn't a proper way. But the choice between "going along to get along" and "being senselessly incarcerated" should be straightforward. More, I do not encourage 'going along to get along,' I encourage meaningful organization. But that's another story.

    I point this out only for the irony. I.e. advocates of the race must be conscious of their advocacy's implication.

    But pretty excellent film.
     
  5. PurpleMoons

    PurpleMoons Administrator STAFF

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    What i find ironic is Black folx afraid of being black folx because of racial profiling.
    From our enslaved Ancestors up until this day we have always had our on language, music, and style.
    We let a bunch of white folx tell us they're treating us a certain way because of our differences and we want to scurry and change our essence to be more like them.

    The problem is not how we act, dance, and speak. The problem is how dare they judge our humanity and treat our people with blatant disrespect because of our difference. And even if we totally conformed to the white mans idea of what is the proper way to act, dress, and speak, that wont change nothing. They will still look at our skin and think we are less than their pets.

    :heart:
     
  6. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    All blacks in NY should fight this law. We did in Detroit







    ..
     
  7. Asomfwaa

    Asomfwaa Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    "Racial Profiling" does not challenge a "Black Identity" but a "Criminal Identity." The rap music in question is literally called "Gangsta Rap" by the industry. Young people would say "I'm gangsta" as a means of self-affirmation. Fifty Cent put out a track called "Wanksta" addressing the 'gangsta' masquerade. It's very false to say "black folk afraid to be black folk" when this "rap music" has little to do with "Black culture" when we really define 'culture.' For instance, 'culture' is an ancestral practice, but which ancestor sagged, sold drugs and adored prison culture? "Rap music" is no more Black than a lot of cultural practices. Don't make them pigeonhole you.

    I never advised being more like them--no need to put words in my mouth. Nevertheless, to here value the criminal element amongst us is a weak and misguided protest. I heard people get beat up in locker rooms as part of gang initiation--loud tumbling, kicks and punches--these same would go on to injure their own Brothers and Sisters. I'm not going to value this subculture.

    Ironically, this subculture is more European than you may realize. "Hazing" is a White practice. "Organized Crime" are White practices. The fashion sense is all buried in White culture. Cultural figures--Gangsters--are usually White--see Scarface. In essence, these "Rap heads" are White emulators who intentionally criminalize themselves and become criminalized.

    Unfocused struggle would rally for them--but to what avail?

    White people look at us as less than. That's not news. What's at issue is whether they will incarcerate us. A defense of 'self-criminalization' is antithetical to progress.

    In other words, you can't help he who won't help himself.

    A person who adopts a sub-culture created by White people to legitimize White policing on Black people makes his bed.
     
  8. PurpleMoons

    PurpleMoons Administrator STAFF

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    Then how do you explain other races such as europeans and asians who dress and and sing along to rap music...bumpin it loudly in their cars while toting guns and drugs to boot not getting profiled like our people? How do you explain the profiling of Africans from the continent...who don't dress like african americans...let alone dont listen to rap music getting profiled as well?

    With every generation starting from our Ancestors, cultural change is inedible. Somethings were took from the old and redefined with the new. It doesn't make it any less cultural. It just adds on to it. So you think Blacks people adore the prison system? You think sagging pants determines the morality of a person? What about poverty and living standards? Does that not have an affect on the choices people make when it comes to committing crimes?


    So you just want them to pull their pants up, stop listening to rap music and stop committing crimes? Dont we want that for all people? The business man in the suit who swindle millions our of innocent people. How about The drug lords who ship billions of illegal drugs into the country who never...for some reason get caught? How about the gun merchant who sell guns for discount prices under the table? What about the real gangsters who murder, beat, and extort people when ever the mood is right. Why aren't these people in jail by the buses load as well?

    Sagging pants, broken dialect, and rap music don't make you a criminal. However, poor living conditions and poverty might. I'm of the opinion that you may also be in some type of pigeon hold if you think clothing, speech, and music makes one more likely criminal minded?

    What does this have to do with racial profiling? Plus that's not a black issue alone. That is a people issue. Black people aren't they only ones who use these methods. This is not to say that these issues aren't important and needs to be resolved. However the issues in this thread is racial profiling and violations of our rights.

    Then why aren't White in prison at the same rate as Black Americans? Maybe...Just maybe, it has something to do with the color of their skin and their economical status.

    Racial profiling is just that. Racial profiling! Not cultural profiling.

    Of course its not news. So why would you associate dialect and dress as a reasoning for racial profiling? It sounds more like an excuse to me. The prison system is nothing less than a plantation to harvest Black Slaves.

    As Black people, we need to stand up against these type of bias reasonings for stop and frisk, and the violation of our rights as citizens and people.

    :heart:
     
  9. Asomfwaa

    Asomfwaa Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Exceptions don't make rules. As it were, a lot of Black people are never stopped by the police. In the video we observe someone who was stopped multiple times a day. There's clearly more than race at play. To say otherwise is to disbelieve your eyes.

    Yes, certainly, Africans are the predominant victim. We always have been. This was the essence of America's legal system. But to adopt a self-criminalizing culture then whine over being criminalized is hardly worth a defense.


    Starting from which Ancestors? There's tremendous consistency in ancient systems (so much so that you can see the same traditions in different parts of the world.) We were recently more tenuous, but that's to do with cultural imperialism and cultural genocide--it's hardly a tradition among African people but an imposed condition of being dominated.

    "Sagging" is a direct appeal to Prison mores. That was my reference. We do not need to discuss crimonlogy, it's neither here nor there.

    Of course. Why object to this claim?

    The idea is that this sub-culture is actually disproportionally targeted, yet this isn't entirely unreasonable. This sub-culture is either among the worst elements of our population or aspire to it. It's a question of what do you want?

    Marcus Garvey said it this way:

    "I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there."

    I do not know how familiar you are with the sub-culture, but it's generally anti-African and reeking with self-hatred. Certainly they are African people, but they are self-destructive.

    I do not like the idea of White people in Black areas, yet this sub-culture almost demands it. They almost live for White attention. It's sickening.

    You're getting ahead of yourself. I'm not law enforcement. You're asking the wrong person these questions.

    I never said something makes one more criminal, however to dismiss the idea that police officers take these cultural cues as signals isn't helping one's case. More, to claim that these cues are not associated with crime is untrue: sagging pants evolved from prison, the dialect of some young comes from rappers who promote criminal behavior.

    See the recent Snoop Dogg song: "Young, Wild and Free." A far cry from "Young, Gifted and Black."





    I'm pointing out to you that you're defending a White culture as though it were Black. You came and accused me of not defending a Black culture, and I am showing that it's in a lot of ways a White culture.



    Of course, but that's not a recent phenomenon. Black people have been disproportionally imprisoned for over a hundred years.

    But that's a different phenomenon from "racial profiling."


    You're looking at two different things. Mass Incarceration is different from Stop and Frisk.

    Stop and Frisk is racial but it's also cultural. Obviously, from the racial perspective it doesn't matter that it's cultural, but from the cultural perspective it shows that we have some correcting to do, rather than pretending that cultural affairs are unimportant. In a large way, these cultural elements lend themselves to the state of affairs.
     
  10. PurpleMoons

    PurpleMoons Administrator STAFF

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    Exception seems to be the rule!
    I don't understand you Brother. First you say, "a lot of Black people are never stopped by the police." Then you go on to say, "Yes, certainly, Africans are the predominant victim. We always have been. This was the essence of America's legal system. By who's standard is Black culture self-criminalizing? A criminal is a criminal regardless his/hers culture. One don't need to be dressed and/or have a certain interest in music to commit criminal acts. If you look at any poor community you will find a hire rate of crime. I will never agree that its okay to violate anothers right because they look suspicious or speak a different dialect.


    Music, attire, and code language have always been a part of our culture. Though mostly its been practiced when certain ceremonies and rituals took place.


    Who says so? Who said they sagged their pants because of prison appeal? Perhaps they learned and liked it while in prison, that don't mean they practice this form of dress to represent prison life. Who said they where their pants to represent life in prison?


    I'm not objecting. I just wanted to be clear i was understanding your claim. If thats what you would like to see, thats what you will like to see. Although i don't think it will make a difference on why blacks are profiled more than others. My argument is, its unreasonable.

    I hear Brother Macus Gravey! However, there was most likely some Blacks who didn't wanna go back to Africa. Good as well as the bad. I also bet there was some Africans that didn't/dont want African Americans there either. But i digress. Just thinking out loud.

    I'm not that familiar with sub-cultures. And it may be anti-African because its African American based. I cant say indefinitely its self-hatred either. It may even be a coping mechanism to deal with hate that is directed at us. And i don't agree that the culture demands for white people in our communities. They are there because we can't keep them out.


    You weren't law enforcement when you said its practically alright for officers to stop and violate the rights of black people because their culture calls for it. You didn't say it in that way, but thats how it came across to me.


    President Obama doesn't follow these cultural cues, yet that didn't stop folks from looking at him like a criminal either. Like hes about to steal something and/or commit a crime. African American criminals evolved from poverty and strife. Rapper do promote criminal behaviors, but these behaviors were there before they got the platform to broadcast.

    Absolutely not. I'm defending the right to wear, say, and listen to whatever one wishes without being violated for doing so without legitimate cause.

    Thats my point. Cultural practices is not the issue as to why. How is it different when this phenomenon has been the same for over hundreds of years? We can't allow them to use music, dress, and' speech as reason for violating rights. Oh you look like a criminal so that gives me the right to treat you like one? Absolutely not!

    I'm looking at it in two different ways because the end outcome can lead to mass incarceration. Say a black person gets stopped. He has done nothing wrong. The officers frisk him and he fights back because he knows his rights are being violated. Now he's in prison for resisting an officer. This reaction to a stop and frisk can lead him to being incarcerated. This is not to say alot of people in prisons are innocent now, but if allowed to continue, it can easily become a mass issue.

    :heart:
     
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