Black People : Congo celebrates 50 years of "Independence" while Lumumba rolls over in his grave

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Jun 30, 2010.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Inspight of his life giving efforts the nation is back in the hands of the devils he rallied his people against


    As Congo Marks 50th Anniversary of Independence, Human Rights Abuses Rise in Congo and Neighboring Rwanda

    Tomorrow marks the fiftieth anniversary of Congolese independence from colonial Belgian rule. On June 30, 1960, the new prime minister of the independent Congolese government, Patrice Lumumba, declared an end to the slavery of colonialism and a new beginning for the country and the liberation of the entire continent of Africa. But today, jubilee independence celebrations in the Democratic Republic of Congo are marred by ongoing violence and increasing political repression, in particular the recent murder of Congo’s leading human rights activist Floribert Chebeya. Meanwhile, repression is on the rise in neighboring Rwanda, as well, ahead of scheduled elections this August, which incumbent president Paul Kagame is widely expected to win.


    http://www.democracynow.org/2010/6/29/as_congo_marks_50th_anniversary_of
     
  2. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    his view on democracy and Pan Africanism

    In my view, there is only one way: bringing all Africans together in popular movements or unified parties.

    All tendencies can coexist within these parties bringing all nationals together, and each will have its say, both in the discussion of problems facing the country and in the conduct of public affairs.

    A genuine democracy will be at work within these parties and each will have the satisfaction of expressing its opinions freely.

    The more closely united we are, the better we will resist oppression, corruption, and those divisive maneuvers which experts in the policy of “divide and rule” are resorting to.
     
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Published on Wednesday, June 30, 2010 by Foreign Policy in Focus
    Congo's Quest for Liberation Continues

    by Bahati Ntama Jacques and Beth Tuckey

    Congo has long been the focus of resource exploitation. The first era of colonization in Africa, beginning in the mid-1880s, was most pronounced in this central African country. Belgium's King Leopold brutalized the population in his quest for rubber and riches, leaving a legacy of natural resource exploitation by white Europeans in the heart of Africa.

    Today, at the 50th anniversary of Congo's independence, the country continues to be a source of wealth for the world, yet the Congolese people live in poverty. Like many African nations, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is suffering under this new era of neocolonialism, where natural resources belong not to those who live on the land but to those with power and access to global markets.

    The pursuit of true independence and liberation in Congo will continue until foreign nations cease their policies of exploitation.

    History of Violence
    When Patrice Lumumba began agitating for independence in early 1960, there was great hope that Congolese people would benefit from the resources of their land, lifting the country out of poverty and into an era of prosperity. Instead, after nearly three months in office as Congo's first elected prime minister, Lumumba was deposed in a coup and four months later killed in a plot orchestrated by the Belgian government with the complicity of the United States. Mobutu Sese Seko, a staunch opponent of communism, took power in a CIA-backed coup and became one of Africa's most brutal dictators. He drove Congo — which he named Zaire — into ruin.

    In 1996, Rwanda and Uganda invaded Congo and forced Mobutu to flee, while a new leader, Laurent Kabila, rose to power. Since then, eastern Congo has been mired in conflict, overrun by rebel groups and government militias, each of which seeks control of Congo's vast wealth. It's estimated that between 1998 and 2007, 5.4 million people died in DRC as a direct or indirect result of conflict.

    http://www.commondreams.org/view/2010/06/30-9
     
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