Black Entertainment : Confronting Old Demons: A Look at "Maangamizi"

Discussion in 'Black Entertainment' started by Blaklioness, Dec 22, 2010.

  1. Blaklioness

    Blaklioness Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  2. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    In Nigeria, within the pre-colonial cultures... it is considered taboo to make made fun or ostracize a mentally ill person, because we believe they are in constant touch with the spirit world.

    same taboo also applies for a disabled person..
     
  3. Blaklioness

    Blaklioness Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Who is making fun? You think the film does that? It wasn't my intention in posting it. I think this film was produced by nonblacks, so, in terms of worth in my view, it's a rarity. I enjoyed the African ambience and the message about confronting the demons of the past in order to reclaim your power. In my view, the mental illnesses often dealt with by folks is due to some level of inability to tell people to go screw themselves....lol! Seriously, when Black people, especially Black women, get to the point of reclaiming our voices and stop allowing other people to define and dictate (away) our Blackness, then those "illnesses" will go away and our TRUE voice(s) will take their place. Openly communicating with good ancestral spirits, like the character in this movie, is a liberating part of that healing. I understood why she had the issues of 'voicelessness' that she did; so, in actuality, I didn't really see her as 'sick'--even in her ability to communicate with Maangamizi. Anyhoo...thanks for sharing.



     
  4. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    no of course not... was just making commentary i work in the health field so i see how mentally Ill people are treated...
     
  5. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Watching the film now... I'm half way through it ..the message is very powerful...
     
  6. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  7. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I'm drawn into this movie.

    So far, I watched only about 30 minutes though. However, I already have opinions about what I've seen so far. I see the dangerous and harmful affects of white missionary movements into the continent of Africa and it is awful, just awful. Even though white people so craftily did not per-se, initiate A FORCEFUL MOVEMENT of their religion but, what they did was gain the help of certain Black Africans of whom, in turn, forced a false 'white Jesus religion' upon other Africans. And this movement of 'forced anti-Christianity' was also very deliberate because it did the work intended, and that was to completely block Black Africans from knowing a major part of 'Black History' regarding what actually happened thousands of years ago even in Africa...

    The woman Samehe was victimized by two conflicting ways of life brought upon her from both her father and her mother and she had to go inside of herself to defend her right to choose. That's is what I believe so far, but I'm interested in how the rest of this movie will unfold. So I will hopefully be back!
     
  8. Blaklioness

    Blaklioness Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Ok. I've begun listening to his speech. I don't think I've gotten to the part you're referencing yet because I don't see a lot of direct relevance to the film as of yet, but I will keep listening. I will tell you though, he's speaking a lot of truth, so he's got my attention for sure. Thanks!




     
  9. Blaklioness

    Blaklioness Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I fully agree. Her father was obviously mentally ill and was, therefore, a prime candidate for extremism. Force, as such, is not always physical; it isn't the physical acts of aggression that have caused the most lasting damage--it's been the mental/'spiritual'/psychological tactics. There is no level of prison that can contain you like your own mind---once the 'wardens' and 'guards' have 'properly' trained you, they no longer have to keep constant watch. At any rate, I look forward to your analysis of it.




     
  10. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    An African male called in and was lamenting on the fact he dosen't feel accepted by african Americans..I felt Mr Umar response was profound and also ties in with message in this movie..

    he doesn't necessarily reference the movies per se though..

    Yeah i like him as-well for he respecting black people enough to state History and our current problems in its proper context- and also comes up a solutions... NO EGO involved and no agendas...:toast:
     
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