Black History Culture : Clothilde: Last Slave Ship

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by cherryblossom, Apr 2, 2013.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560
    [​IMG]


    In the summer of 1860 more than fifty years after the United States legally abolished the international slave trade, 110 children, teenagers, and young adults from Benin and Nigeria were brought ashore in Alabama under cover of night. They were the last recorded group of Africans deported to the United States. Timothy Meaher, an established Mobile businessman, sent the slave ship, the Clotilda to Ouidah in the Bight of Benin, on a bet that he could "bring a shipful of ******* right into Mobile Bay under the officers' noses." He won the bet.

    This book reconstructs -with never published photographs and documents- the lives of the young people in West Africa, recounts their capture and passage in the slave pen in Ouidah and their dreadful voyage, and describes their experience of slavery and freedom alongside American-born men and women.

    For the first time, the personal and detailed testimonies of the slavers, and those of the deported Africans are gathered together to tell the best-documented but also the most forgotten story of the slave trade to the Western Hemisphere.

    After emancipation, the group, under the leadership of Gumpa -a nobleman from Dahomey- reunited from various plantations, bought land, and founded their own settlement, known as African Town. They ruled it according to their customary laws, spoke their own regional language and, when giving interviews, insisted that writers use their African names so that their families would know that they were still alive.

    The last survivor of the Clotilda died in 1935, but African Town (now called Africatown) is still home to the descendants of the men and women who dreamed of Africa in Alabama.....

    http://www.sylvianediouf.com/dreams...lotilda_and_the_story_of_the_last_a_58311.htm
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560
    In 1860, the ship Clotilde sailed from Ghana, West Africa for its destination, Mobile, Alabama. Aboard were over one hundred Africans who were sold into slavery by the Dahomey tribe. The slaves, members of the Tarkbar tribe, had been captured by the Dohomey tribe during the tribal warfare in Ghana at the time. The price paid for each slave was one hundred dollars.The Clotilde was owned by Timothy Meaher, a wealthy shipper and shipyard owner in Mobile. Its captain was William Foster.
    On the night of July 9, 1860, the Clotilde entered Mobile Bay and was approaching the port of Mobile. Captain Foster loaded his illegal cargo onto a riverboat and sent them ashore to hide them. From this point, the Africans were distributed among the parties who had invested in the illegal venture. Captain Foster then set fire to the Clotilde, sending it to the bottom. By this time, federal authorities had learned of this illegal activity and was on the lookout for the Clotilde.

    Thirty-two of the Africans were sent to the property of Timothy Meaher, located three miles north of Mobile in an area known as Magazine Point. This was the heart of what was to become known as Africatown.

    With the government investigating the crime, the Africans were left on their own to survive. Fortunately for them, the land was rich and the forests were full of game. For an African tribesman, survival proved to be little problem. Among those Africans was a man named Cudjoe Lewis (real name was Kazoola). He would be the last surviving member of the original Africans.

    Immediately, the Africans starting building housing. These were probably shelters built of whatever they found growing in the Alabama forests; in time, houses were built. Among them was a medicine man, Jabez. The chief of Africatown was Charlie Poteet (original name unknown). In time, other Africans who escaped the Clotilde found Africatown and became residents.

    These people formed a self-governing society. They spoke their native language and engaged in their tribal traditions well into the twentieth century.

    The 1861 federal court case of US v. Byrnes Meaher, Timothy Meaher and John Dabey did not find enough evidence to convict Meaher. The case was dismissed. It is believed that the start of the US Civil War played an important part in that decision.

    Finally, due to an Alabama state law, which dictates that all children under the age of 16 years are to be enrolled in school. The children of Africatown were expected to attend school and learn English.

    Cudjoe Lewis died in 1934. He was the last of the original settlers of Africatown and spoke frequently to curious writers and newspaper men. He gave his version of the history of the tribal warfare in his native country, plus the history of Africatown. At the time of his death, his fellow tribesmen still carried on the language and traditions of their Africa home. This continued well into the 1950s.

    In time, Prichard, Alabama grew to encompass the tribe’s village. The following generations were educated in public schools and eventually, the original language and customs were largely abandoned. Africatown became a part of Prichard, Alabama, a suburb of Mobile and it is still there today.....

    http://jayssouth.com/alabama/africatown/

     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560
    In 1858, during a trip to Montgomery on his steamboat, Robert B. Taney, and Captain Timothy Meaher conceived of the voyage of the Clotilda. Captain Meaher bet some eastern gentlemen $100,000 that he could bring some Afrikans, or as he stated, some ******* to Mobile without getting caught.


    He decided to get the slaves from the King of Dahomey because his kingdom was one of the chief slave trading states in Africa, and at the time, the trade was thriving in Dahomey where slaves were plentiful and cheap. There the captain secured 130 Afrikans that had been captured from various parts of West Afrika. The Mobile Press did not make things better when they posted in their papers that the “King of Dahomey” was selling his people and for how much! It seems as if this may have been a concerted effort between several parties.

    Upon further research I have found that this “King of Dahomey” was the tenth of the twelve kings of Dahomey born as Badohou. He later took the throne name of Glele. Glele succeeded his father Ghezo not only physically but in all of his father’s political enterprises. Sadly, this including slave raiding and selling of Afrikan bodies to Europeans. He made concessions with the French who, though speaking against slavery abroad, turned a blind eye to it in Dahomey....


    ....Zora Neal Hurston interviewed with the last survivor of the Clotilda incident whose name at the time was Cudjoe Lewis. She found out that his birth name was Kudjo Kazoola (who later died in 1935)and that his was from the Tarkar tribe which was a subgroup of the Akan/Ashanti. Kudjo relayed to Hurston that his village had been raided by “some very large women” when he was just a little boy, and that was when he was taken. Western anthropology usually refers to these women as Amazons (a word taken from the fact that the Greek Amazon women had one breast). These were the Dahomeans Abosi warrior women. The connection between old Dahomey (now Benin) and Mobile was acknowledged in 1994 when a delegation of Beninoise officials came to Mobile and deemed Africatown a sister city to the whole of Benin.....

    http://www.newafrikanvodun.com/clotilda.html
     
  5. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560
  6. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    Messages:
    32,015
    Likes Received:
    11,483
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    retired computer geek
    Location:
    north philly ghetto
    Ratings:
    +13,745
    "In a tale worthy of a novelist"
     
  7. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    Messages:
    32,015
    Likes Received:
    11,483
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    retired computer geek
    Location:
    north philly ghetto
    Ratings:
    +13,745
    in 1858 $100,000 was not an amount of money that a man would bet.
     
  8. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    Messages:
    32,015
    Likes Received:
    11,483
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    retired computer geek
    Location:
    north philly ghetto
    Ratings:
    +13,745
    now tell me please what is the benefit of these stories to the black people of TODAY?
     
  9. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560
    Ask the descendants of these slaves, many of whom still live in Prichard, AL, just how "worthy" it truly is.

    Not to the white men who bet it in 1860 but to the Africans they enslaved no amount of money could ever be worth their lives.

    Oh, so THESE ancestors should just be "swept under the rug," huh.

    THEIR stories don't deserve to be told, huh. smh.
     
Loading...