Black People : Civil Rights Movement Veterans -- Support

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by ct, Aug 1, 2006.

  1. ct

    ct Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 15, 2006
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    7
    Ratings:
    +7
    Guys, I wanted to share with you a site that provides information on Civl Rights Movement Veterans. It is located at: http://www.crmvet.org/. The title of the site says the following:

    Civil Rights Movement Veterans
    "We who believe in freedom cannot rest," — Ella Baker

    The reason I am bringing it up is because over the weekend, 7/29, my son hosted an event where Bernice Sims a "Civil Rights Movement Veteran" attended and spoke. To help recall who she is as it relates to the movement read the brief overview on Bernice Sims below:

    I joined the youth branch of the NAACP in 1960 under the leadership of MS. Field Representative, Medgar Evers. I was in his home a few days before he was killed in his driveway. I was among the youth who were sent out to test the early stages of non-violence activism in Meridian, MS. Later, I joined CORE during the Ms Freedom Summer Project. I was recruited by Michael Schwerner and wife, Rita. In Meridian, MS. I worked in the CORE/COFO Office and Freedom School. I taught literacy,sewing, marched-in, sang-in, stood-in; registered voters to ascertain the MS. Freedom Ballots that were to be used at the 1964 Democratic Convention. I have worked as a teacher, social worker, public servant, artist and actress.

    James Chaney was my next door neighbor and friend. All three left from our home before going to Philadelphia, MS. It has been a painful journey. In 1995, I finally put into writing my memoirs of those years in MS. Every time I go into a voting booth, I carry the memory of my three lost friends and veterans of the CRM."

    The reason I am mentioning Bernice Sims is because she is a legend, her and many were willing and gave up their lives for the movement. She stated that she had seen Megar Evans a few days before he got killed and that James Chaney and the other two guys left her house an hour before they were missing because they were going to Philiadelphia, MS to investigate a burning church. Her brother also was suppose to had went, but didn't get a chance to. The three guys were participating in "Freedom Summer". Ms. Sims also stated that her mother's house was used as rest stop for the Freedom Fighters. When Ms. Sims spoke she stated that it hurts that many people have forgotten the Civil Rights Movement Veterans. The site list all of the current living survials of the movement.

    One of the things that I hope that people would do is to take the time to go to the guest comment bulletin board located at: http://www.crmvet.org/guestbk.htm and write their comments to them. You can also consider sending a personal email their names are listed on the website or send them a letter and say thank you. Just think the love they would feel if we took the time to do something like this. The living veterans deserve to be remembered. It is my hope that we take the time to remember our past in order to live our future.
     
  2. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    Messages:
    32,011
    Likes Received:
    11,483
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    retired computer geek
    Location:
    north philly ghetto
    Ratings:
    +13,745
    naw, all they remember is the words to the latest hip hop song........
     
  3. ct

    ct Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 15, 2006
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    7
    Ratings:
    +7
    James, I hope they take a moment and reflect on what their lives could have been like, if these people hadn't believe in something more powerful than themselves and wanted to look out for the present and future generations. I personally wrote on the bulletin board because I really never thought about them in that way until I heard Ms. Sims speak on Saturday. I didn't know the bulletin board exist until lately. If we would send out this message like we do some of those emails that are hoax, how many people we could make feel happy or cared about. Many of them are up in age and it does make a difference when someone cares.

    Overall, no one is asking for monies, but rather "I thank you".

    Callie
     
  4. ct

    ct Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 15, 2006
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    7
    Ratings:
    +7
    Artivist Article

    My son stated the following in a newspaper article:

    History through art is one way of reaching the masses to deliver important messages. “It’s very important to reach the person on the street,” he advises. “People don’t realize how important they are.” Knowing our history is one way of helping others to know their own worth – based on what has come before.

    Below is the complete article on my son from the Tri-State Defender by Tim Bulter:

    http://tri-statedefenderonline.com/articlelive/articles/84/1/Word-of-Art/Word-of-Art.html
     
  5. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560
    Medgar Wiley Evers (July 2, 1925 – June 12, 1963)



     
  6. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2001
    Messages:
    69,983
    Likes Received:
    3,978
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    BUSINESS owner
    Location:
    Da~WINDY*CITY //CHICAGO
    Ratings:
    +4,178
    Very powerful and uplifting thankz
     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560
    Chevene Bowers "C.B." King (October 12, 1923 - March 15, 1988)

    [​IMG]

    C. B. King was a prominent African American lawyer known for his courage, courtroom eloquence, and legal skills in the face of fierce and even violent opposition during the civil rights struggle in southwest Georgia. The first black lawyer in the area, King was an inspiration to an entire generation of young law interns and civil rights activists....

    ... he opened his law practice in the mid-1950s, King was one of only a handful of African American lawyers in the entire state and the only black lawyer south of Atlanta who would take on civil and criminal cases. Frequently King's reception in the courts was markedly uncivil. One of his legal partners in the 1970s, Herbert Phipps, now a Georgia Court of Appeals judge, recalled the hostility his partner faced. Phipps noted that court officials did not want King in court and would try to make him leave or sit with the observers. Once, the judge would not halt proceedings at King's request, though the case was going late into the night. When King asked for water, he was brought a bucket with a ladle. Characteristically, he made this a matter of court record, which later went up to the appeals court.

    He stood his ground in the face of resentful opposition inside and outside the courtroom so firmly that he was once asked if he had a chip on his shoulder. "I beg your pardon," he said, "I have the law on my shoulder." Another time, King was addressed in court as "C. B." instead of "Mr. King," the conventional manner of address accorded to white men. He countered the incivility by referring to Police Chief Pritchett by his first name, Laurie....

    ...The Civil Rights Era
    The 1960s brought a new set of complexities and challenges when ongoing struggles for equality of opportunity came to a head in southwest Georgia, as they did throughout the South. Civil rights protesters in the area looked to King, who aided them immeasurably. He was central to legal defense throughout the Albany Movement and beyond, defending Freedom Riders, the Americus Four, incarcerated civil rights protestors, and others caught up in the struggle for equality. Among his more famous clients were Ralph Abernathy, Andrew Young, Martin Luther King Jr., and William G. Anderson, leader of the Albany Movement.

    In 1962, when King visited the jail to check up on white civil rights protester Bill Hansen, whose white fellow prisoners had broken his jaw, Sheriff Cull Campbell assaulted King with a cane. A national photographer's snapshot of the battered, bloodied, and bandaged attorney was picked up by the wire services, made the first section of the New York Times, and was flashed around the world. These and other incidents inspired King in his fight to counter the forces that so often tried to stop his legal defense work. ...

    [​IMG]

    ...Political Career
    King made two attempts to secure political office. His race to win a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives in 1964, though unsuccessful, was a landmark effort, for he was the first black in Georgia to run for Congress since the Reconstruction era.

    Nominated five years later, in 1969, by the state's black leadership, he became Georgia's first African American candidate for governor....

    ...As a culminating tribute to King's legacy, in November 2002 the new federal courthouse in downtown Albany was named in his honor.

    http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/nge/Article.jsp?id=h-1100
     
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560
    [​IMG]


    James Morris Lawson, Jr. (born September 22, 1928)[1] was a leading theoretician and tactician of nonviolence within the American Civil Rights Movement....


    ....Born in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, Lawson grew up in Massillon, Ohio. While a freshman at Baldwin Wallace College in Berea, Ohio, he joined the Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR), an organization founded by A.J. Muste, and the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), an organization affiliated with FOR. Both FOR and CORE advocated nonviolent resistance to racism; CORE conducted sit-ins in some northern cities in the late 1940s and embarked on a freedom ride more than a decade before the more famous ones of the early 1960s.
    Consistent with those principles of nonviolence, Lawson declared himself a conscientious objector and refused to report for the draft in 1951. He served fourteen months in prison after refusing to take either a student or ministerial deferment.[2]

    After his release from prison, Lawson went as a Methodist missionary to Nagpur, India, where he studied satyagraha, the principles of nonviolence resistance that Mohandas Gandhi and his followers had developed.[2] He returned to the United States in 1955, entering the Graduate School of Theology at Oberlin College in Ohio.

    Work with Martin Luther King Jr. and the Nashville Student Movement

    One of his Oberlin professors introduced him to Martin Luther King, Jr., who had led the Montgomery Bus Boycott in Montgomery, Alabama and had also embraced Gandhi's principles of nonviolent resistance. King urged Lawson to come South, telling him "Come now. We don't have anyone like you down there."

    Lawson moved to Nashville, Tennessee and enrolled at the Divinity School of Vanderbilt University, where he served as the southern director for CORE and began conducting nonviolence training workshops for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. While in Nashville, Lawson met and mentored a number of young students at Vanderbilt, Fisk University, and other area schools in the tactics of nonviolent direct action.[3] In Nashville, Lawson trained many of the future leaders of the 1960s Civil Rights Movement, among them Diane Nash, James Bevel, Bernard Lafayette, Marion Barry, and John Lewis. In 1959 and 1960 these and other Lawson-trained activists launched the Nashville sit-ins to challenge segregation in downtown stores. Along with activists from Atlanta, Georgia and elsewhere in the South, they formed the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in April 1960.

    Lawson's students played a leading role in the Open Theater Movement, the Freedom Rides, the 1963 March on Washington, Mississippi Freedom Summer the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, the 1963 Birmingham Children's Crusade, the 1965 Selma Voting Rights Movement, and the 1966 Chicago Open Housing Movement over the next few years.

    Lawson's expulsion from Vanderbilt as a result of these activities became one of the celebrated incidents of the era and eventually a source of deep embarrassment to the university. During the 2006 graduation ceremony Vanderbilt apologized for its treatment of Lawson; he is now a member of its faculty....



    ....http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Lawson
     
Loading...