Brother AACOOLDRE : Christian Marriage, Egyptian Marriage

Discussion in 'AACOOLDRE' started by AACOOLDRE, Dec 28, 2009.

  1. AACOOLDRE

    AACOOLDRE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE AND ANCIENT EGYPTIAN MARRIAGE
    By Andre Austin

    Back during my college days my professor picked a fight with me. Making a remarkable declaration that the Christian religion was superior to ancient Egypt’s because it had a marriage ceremony that was religious. The professor said the Egyptians apparently just moved in together and they were married. Now it my turn to set the record straight. I was thrown off guard and unprepared. I did a little digging up and bam here it is. Hold your seat belts cause its gonna get deep.

    When Egypt was unified after having a race war with white Asians they celebrated it with two rings of Upper and Lower Egypt united in union. Egypt had at least three gods that were associated with marriage.

    1. Hathor goddess of Love brought man/woman together

    2. Neit , goddess of Canal might appeared at Jesus wedding @ Cana (Canal)

    3. Isis, goddess of Love and marriage contracts

    Isis was the wife/sister of Osiris producing Horus by a virgin birth was the trinity of Christianity. You will see this triple trinity in the triangle of Plato.

    They say that Assumptions are the Mother of all mess ups. No pun intended with the Assumption of Mary being of Egyptian origin and alternatively called this festival the “bride of the Nile“ (Egyptian Mystics By M. Gadalla p.96).

    When the boy King Tutankhamen died his successor King Ay married his wife Ankhesenamen. The famed Egyptologist Howard Carter received a letter about it in 1931.

    “My Dear Carter,

    It will interest you to know that I have just seen a finger-ring which has on it the cartouche of Ankhesenamen along side King Ay. This can only be interpreted as meaning that King Ay married Ankhesenamen the widow of King Tut. The ring is blue glaze” (The Murder of King Tut by B. Brier p.186). King Tut lived before Moses was born to write the five books of the Bible.

    My professor apparently didn’t know that the early Christian fathers already conceded the ring was adopted from the Egyptians.

    The Wedding Ring*- The idea of the wedding ring itself dates back to ancient times, when a husband would wrap circles of braided grass around his bride’s wrist and ankles, believing it would keep her spirit from leaving her body. The bands evolved into leather, carved stone, metal, and later silver and gold.*The Egyptian gold, before the introduction of coinage, had been usually kept in the form of a ring; and the Egyptian at his marriage placed one of these pieces of gold on his wife's finger in token of his entrusting her with all his property. The early Christians saw no harm in following this custom; and in our own marriage ceremony the man places the same plain ring of gold on his bride's finger when he says, "With all my worldly goods I thee endow."


    The union or wedding ring has been used to symbolize marriage since the days of the early Egyptians. Their literature mentions rings linking it with weddings, and it is likely that the first "wedding rings" were used by the Egyptians. The circle of the ring represents mutual love and affection roundly flowing from one to the other. The circle represented eternity in Egyptian hieroglyphic script, and marriage was seen as a permanent bond. That forever stuff*.

    We have yet to find a written marriage ceremony in Egypt but they had marriage. Herodotus, a Greek historian visited Egypt in the 5th century Bc and reported “The Egyptians…they also practice monogamy” ( Histories Book 2:92). Diodorus of Sicily reported: “In accordance with the marriage-customs of the Egyptians the priest have but one wife, but any other man takes as many as he may determine” (Library of History Book 1:80). It appears the Christians followed this example see Titus 1:6 & 1 Timothy 3:2.

    Plato went to Egypt and studied under their priests between 15-22 years. Plato reports this statement found in Plutarch’s Isis and Osiris:

    One might conjecture that the Egyptians hold in high honor the most beautiful of the Triangles (Just to know the Zodiac Angle is where we get Angels) , since they liken the nature of the universe most closely to it, as Plato in the Republic seems to have made use of it in formulating his figure of Marriage. This Triangle has its upright of three units, its base of four, and its hypotenuse of five, whose power is equal to that of the other two sides. The upright, therefore, may be likened to the male, the base to the female, and the hypotenuse to the child of both, and so Osiris may be regarded as the origin, Isis as the recipient, and Horus as perfected result. (Hebrews 5:9 were Jesus was made perfect) Three is the first perfect odd number: Four is a square whose side is even number two; but Five is in some way like to its father, and in some ways like to its mother, (The Pythagoreans, who learn from Egypt, called five a marriage on the ground that it was produced by the association of the first male number and the first female number. Jesus claimed he was the male morning star in Revelation. In Egypt five rays shoot out from Venus. Jesus stole the Ten virgins analogy from Plato’s wedding-feast found in his book Laws. “As for the wedding-feast, neither family should invite more than five friends of both sexes, and the number of relatives and kinsmen from either side should be limited similarly. No one should incur expense beyond his means”. I find it to be no coincidence that Plato limits five from each sex making up ten when talking about marriage. Plato’s law is a slight echo of Jesus ten virgins analogy where only five of the virgins get to see the bridegroom in heaven because they planed and prepared while the other five didn’t. See Matthew 25: 1-12
     
  2. AACOOLDRE

    AACOOLDRE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    any people have been asking for a summary of my talk at ARCE last weekend and so here it is:

    In most societies, the three life events that involve the most ritual activity are birth, marriage and death. While Egyptian rituals associated with birth and death are well-known, Egyptologists hqave long contended that the ancient Egyptians did not perform any sort of wedding ceremony or ritual. Ancient Egyptian couples, they said (in a thouroughly modern way), simply moved in together.

    In my paper, I argued that this was not the case. The main body of evidence I used to support my theory was a collection of songs, probably from Deir el-Medina, known by Egyptologists as "love songs." This misnomer has led Egyptologists to overlook their true function, and that is as wedding songs.

    I used three lines of argument to support my case: 1-comparison between the ancient songs and modern Egyptian wedding songs in terms of themes, 2-references to rituals in the ancient songs that are performed at modern Egyptian weddings, and 3-internal evidence from the songs themselves and comparative material from ancient times dealing with marriage.

    In short, I was able to reconstruct weddings at Deir el-Medina as follows:

    The boy or girl makes a petition to Hathor at Deir el-Bahari, perhaps over a period of 3 days, for a specific spouse.
    The boy approaches his beloved's mother to express an interest in her.
    Once the parents agree on the match, seven days of possibly sex-segregated celebration with singing and feasting takes place, surrounded by flowers.
    Guests at the festivities gives gifts, which are later repaid at similar events.
    In preparation for the groom's arrival the bride has her hair braided, while songs extolling her physical beauty are sung.
    Upon the groom's arrival at his bride's home, an animal is slaughtered on the doorstep, and the groom's hand is kissed 4 times.
    To thank her for her help in obtaining the desired spouse, a feast is made for Hathor.
     
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