Black People : China vs, AFRICOM, in seeking imperialism, need for African Unity more then ever!!!!

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Nov 10, 2009.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    China's $10 billion loan for African development 'motivated by business not aid'
    China moved to expand its ties with resource rich African nations yesterday by promising more than £6 billion in loans for development at a high profile summit in Egypt.

    By Mike Pflanz, East Africa Correspondent
    Published: 5:26PM GMT 08 Nov 2009

    Preferential loans directed towards infrastructure and social programmes where announced by Wen Jiabao, the Chinese premier, at the opening of a two-day China-Africa summit.

    Chinese help for African nations is designed to promote its interests in the export of raw materials and expansion of local markets. The Chinese package would encourage Chinese financial institutions to lend to smaller African firms, expand market access for African products and culitivate good will with local government by helping states cope with climate change.

    Some of the financing would go to cancelling debts the most heavily indebted countries owe to China.

    The loans – double those pledged at the last summit in 2006 – were promised as China and the West vie to expand their influence in Africa by portraying their interests as mutally beneficial. Chinese commentators regularly deride Western involvement in Africa as paternalistic exercises in aid hand-outs.

    "Africa's development is an essential part of achieving global development, and as the sincere and dependable friend of Africa, China deeply feels the difficulties and challenges faced by Africa," Mr Wen said.

    "China's support for Africa's development is real and solid and, in the future, no matter what turbulence the world undergoes, our friendship with the people of Africa will not change."

    Mr Wen disclosed China's direct investment in the world's poorest continent, excluding the financial sector, rose 79 percent to £550 million in the first half of 2009.

    Most of that has come from Chinese companies building roads, ports, railways, housing and oil pipelines, and in its massive demand for oil and minerals.

    Total Chinese investment in Africa reached £16 billion by the end of 2008, according to Chinese figures.

    Trade between China and Africa has also rocketed, driven by China's resource needs and growing African demand for cheap Chinese-made products. In 2008, total trade was £67 billion, up 45.1 percent on 2007.

    But Beijing's motives driving Sunday's announcement are far from purely altruistic, said Martyn Davies, director of the Asia centre at the Gordon Institute of Business Science at the University of Pretoria in South Africa.

    "In the last ten years, Africa's growth has been underpinned by Chinese demand for commodities, and to find those and get them out, you need stronger infrastructure," he said.

    full article;
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...evelopment-motivated-by-business-not-aid.html
     
  2. Blaklioness

    Blaklioness Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Interesting how we keep accepting and embracing nonsense political and economic systems that do NOTHING more than keep us enslaved; and it would have to be true that none other than a mental slave would be sitting on the world's wealth while accepting debt from our enemies based on that very wealth we/they already have.




     
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    You are correct and exact, what the present course of the AU is taking is counter-purpose to the ideology of Kwame Nkhrumah, and the total across continent nationalization of respources
     
  4. Chinelo

    Chinelo Third Eye Is Always Open MEMBER

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    This seems like another attempt to squeeze out the resources of our motherland, for someone else's gain.....

    So yea to get money, they dangle a "carrot on a stick", with this 10 Billion so-called loan, in which would cash strap an already struggling motherland's economic revival, by getting into debt with china......we push the ******** out, yet now allow the yellow man in as if his interests are any better....

    Yes unity within the motherland is needed now.....

    http://**************/story?resource_name=africa-and-the-world-economic-crisis
     
  5. abdurratln

    abdurratln Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Dragonomics

    China is bringing much needed revenue to Africa while the west is refusing to help. Below is another peorspective on Chinese investments in Africa. We are talking about perhaps $50 billion in the last ten years or so.

    Dragonomics in the dark
    Gamal Nkrumah sees hope in the blossoming of Sino-African relations


    China is not only an enormously big country, it is also an emblematic one. The Forum on China's Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) has become a ground-breaking hallmark of Sino-African relations. "Whatever changes may take place in the world, our policy of supporting Africa's economic and social development will not change," Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao assured African delegates at the FOCAC 2009 convened in the Red Sea resort of Sharm El-Sheikh, Sinai. The Chinese premier confirmed what most African policy-makers believe: Chinese investment in Africa does not provide more silk stockings for African queens but has been one of the most benign developments in postcolonial Africa, progressively raising the standards of life of the African masses.

    China's critics will have none of this. There are some Africans, and many Westerners, who dismiss Chinese economic interests in Africa as just as neocolonial as any of the imperialist powers of yesteryear. So does a country's level of development determine the level of Chinese trade? The Chinese entrepreneur does not overlook the precariousness of doing business in Africa. However, the Chinese know far too much about the history of doing business in Africa to assume the accolade of cheerleader.

    The Chinese have long traded with Africa. As early as the second century BC, China's Han Dynasty dispatched emissaries to African potentates and established trade relations with a number of African kingdoms. Images of Africans appeared not infrequently on the artworks of the Tang Dynasty, too. The Song Dynasty had a special relationship with the Kingdom of Zimbabwe and a brisk trade with the Swahili city- states along East Africa's Indian Ocean coastline. The Yuan Dynasty cemented these earlier ties between Africa and China. And, the Chinese explorer and geographer Zhu Xi produced his now fabled map of Africa -- one of the earliest of such detailed historically recorded maps. Meanwhile, it was during the Ming Dynasty that the greatest flowering of commercial exchanges between China and Africa occurred. The Chinese have long been devotees of doing business in Africa in the face of cutthroat Western competition. What inferences and conclusions one draws about the future of African-Chinese economic relations depend on whether one believes that the Chinese method of conducting business in Africa is qualitatively different and superior to that of Westerners.

    The African leaders were tripping over their words at Sharm El-Sheikh. China is a developing country, but its pace of development is at once impressive and inspiring. China has fewer than three cars for every 100 people -- America, on the other hand, has one car for every person of driving age. China is catching up fast with the West. And, it was only a generation ago that the vast majority of Chinese people suffered from the savagism of abject poverty.

    China understands the predicament of Africans. Some 3,000 children die each day in Africa of malaria. China understands that protectionist policies are bad politics, worse economics and the worst diplomacy that could hurt Africa.

    Bilateral trade agreements between China and African nations abound. China has provided $10 billion in concessional loans to African nations, far more appealing to African leaders than the commercial loans of Western donors. And, Chinese trade and development aid is not restricted to the resource-rich countries of the continent. Ethiopia exports $132 million worth of goods to China. Chinese exports to Ethiopia, on the other hand, exceed $432. Still, the most important trading partners of China in Africa are the resource-rich nations. China imports copper from Zambia, iron ore and oil from Gabon, and oil from Angola, Nigeria and Sudan. Angola, Beijing's biggest trading partner in Africa with a $25.5 billion trade-turnover per year, had $10 billion of its debt written off by China -- an astute move on China's part in terms of strengthening its strategic position on the continent.

    China is pandering to an Africa pregnant with promise, one that supply it with much needed raw materials. China has invested heavily in infrastructural development in Africa, though Beijing is still fighting doughtily for credibility in Africa. There are many in the West who accuse the Chinese of dealing specifically with African governments to the detriment of African civil society organisations. However, they disremember that China is a one-party state with a Communist political system -- no multi-party politics in the People's Republic.

    The Chinese, nevertheless, are prepared to play ball with African governments of whatever political shade. That view seems naïve, or else it is exacting, callous and calculated. Libyan leader Mouamar Gaddafi warned China against following in the West's footsteps. "Western powers and companies sucking Africa," he said. There are more profound arguments against a repeat of the neocolonial experience in Africa. What ought to be an emergency arrangement might turn into a permanent one. Chinese leaders insist that China is not poised to take over the role of Western neocolonial powers. The challenge for China to desist from following the same path.

    Africans are fond of consensus. On the whole, the Chinese role in Africa is widely regarded as benevolent. Any schemes the Chinese may have revolve around trade and development, with no pretense to shaping African political life to meet some neocolonial dependency agenda.

    This frustrates Western plans for shaping African political life according to the Western model of electoral democracy controlled by private business. China's most important trading partners in Africa are states that don't follow this model, and are consistently ostracised as pariah states by Western powers. Sudan, for instance, is the largest recipient of Chinese investments in Africa with more than $300 million in Chinese investments in various sectors of the Sudanese economy. Zimbabwe and Guinea are two other African pariah states staunchly supported economically by China. Sudan is followed by Algeria, South Africa and Zambia with over $100 million in Chinese investments each. Nigeria, Tanzania and Kenya are also important trading partners and have over $50 million in Chinese investments each.

    Sinope, China's state-owned oil company, has extensive investments in Africa in a desperate bid by the Chinese to secure alternative sources of hydrocarbons and other energy sources other than the traditional Middle Eastern oil reserves. Sinope owns 40 per cent of Sudan's Greater Nile Petroleum Operating Company and Beijing is Khartoum's biggest supplier of military aircraft and weapons. The Chinese are also investing heavily in Africa's mineral-extracting sector, but not exclusively.

    China's detractors argue that the Chinese strategy is profoundly mistaken and dangerously complacent, and especially so in the long-run. Last Ramadan, rioting broke out against Chinese entrepreneurs in Algeria -- a warning sign that Africans are not prepared to tolerate Chinese insensitivity to local customs and cultural specificities. The Chinese are also accused of living and working in ghettoes that are entirely disassociated from the local milieu.

    Homegrown Chinese technology and its famously cheap consumer goods are proudly paraded throughout Africa, some would say to the detriment of local industry. But this is clearly a transitional phase in relations. A debate is needed on the future direction of African-Chinese relations. That much was clear in Sharm El-Sheikh.

    In Africa, China is playing a long game. The dissatisfaction with democracy in much of Africa owes a great deal to the deep-rooted socio- economic inequalities in African countries and a conviction that governments in the continent by and large favour the interests of the privileged few.

    Deng Xiaoping set China on the road of sweeping economic reforms in 1978. Africa at that time was a continent embroiled in civil wars and labouring under a host of military dictatorships. Today Africa is a largely politically stable continent -- with viable multi-party democracies -- and more importantly as far as the Chinese are concerned, with immense economic potential still waiting to be tapped. And, China, the world's second biggest economy, manages to sustain robust economic growth in the midst of the global economic meltdown. Export growth has held up surprisingly well.

    The gloom and doom in Africa may be overdone. Cynics have dismissed the continent as a hopeless basket case. African economies, too, look much healthier than they were a decade ago. Indeed, one bright light amid the darkness is that several African economies are exhibiting two-digit growth rates -- China's favourites Angola and Sudan. Moreover, Africa is mesmerised by China's Dragonomics.

    However, the odds in favour of an imminent African renaissance look long. Why is this happening? China's is an emerging economy skewed towards exports. After decades of double digit economic growth rates, the Chinese economy is slowing down. Despite slower economic growth rates in emerging markets such as China, other emerging economies like India and Brazil are demonstrating an ever-increasing and all-absorbing interest in Africa. The next phase in Chinese-African relations must be preparing the ground for closer collaboration. This entails less reliance on the US dollar, perhaps more bilateral intercontinental relations, at the same time encouraging African unity. Even contemplating refashioning China's one-party capitalism-with-a-communist-face according to African reality is not such a farfetched notion.

    Sinosceptics, mainly envious and rancorous Westerners fast losing ground in Africa, take an alternative view tinged with their own sense of smugness. Yet if they are honest, Sinosceptics must acknowledge the positive role of China in Africa.

    For those fond of gloating, Western efforts to discredit China in Africa have been largely futile. Yet such are the political and economic changes being wrought by an ascendant China that soon it will overtake Africa's former colonial masters as the continent's main trading partner.

    The transition to a new reality where China calls the shots is well under way. This has allowed China to get off to an impressive start in Africa.

    In economic terms, America is the ideal bad cop -- as far as Africa is concerned -- to China's good cop. African nations knocking on the doors of rich donor nations invariably seem likely to get shorter shrift in Washington.

    African countries still hope to draw on the financial clout and technical expertise of Western powers, but their reliance in China is bound to increase in the years ahead. That is a reasonable bet
     
  6. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    On point!!!!

    And it is sad to see that in the Motherland we have not learned to unite completly, and nationalize all of our strategic resources, so that we call the shots at every stage of the game
     
  7. abdurratln

    abdurratln Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Well, now that you mention it, I think we can learn a lot from the Chinese way of doing business. It took the Communist Party a l;ong time to Unite China. They still have the Taiwan problem. But, look at them now! The west is in deep ecomic crisis while China is booooooooooooooming without a concern. Compared to Obama's litty bitty $73 million to Zimbabwe, China has invested $1 billion during what the wesrt calls hard ecomic times. That's the kind of Communism I like.

    Yeah. Maybe Africa needs a one party state, highly centralized with no nonsense such as we see in the west. We need to stop aping the white man all the time. There is more than one way to do this thing. And, it would appear that the Chinese way provides the best results. There is no need for a two-party system or a multi-party syatem. All we need in one party to Unite Africa from the Tigris-Euphrates tot he Cape of Good Hope.
     
  8. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    My brother please do our brothers and sisters a favor of concern and look at how thoe knuckas treat thier own people.

    China is no longer communist it is imperialist and compared to the tough emperor's who at least had a sense of nobles oblige, through their tyranny, the every dsy people of The People's Republic of China are treated like garbage, and they are the total opposite of Cuba.
    Mao Tse Tung would be rolling in his grave if they did not have him frozen on display.

    They are praised by the CFR, invited to Trilateral meetings and are members of the World Bank,
    and like this BS new world order, and the old NYC cosa nostra, the entire nation and most of that enormous wealth is owned by a few families.

    We spend 800 billion a year, what would a 30 billion per year investment in our Motherlands infrastructure and mining capacities mean, if distributed equitably by the AU?
     
  9. abdurratln

    abdurratln Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Well, you are on point about nationalizing. Actually, it is more a matter of liberarating as in happening in Zimbabwe. We must liberate our reources from enemy control.

    We are campaining for the Pap African Parliament. (http://pan-african-parliament.org/) Our first goal in PAP must be to take control of all resources leaving Africa. Then we must place an export tax on every grain of sand taken from Africa. And, we must tax sufficently to finance African Economic Development. Instead of begging for reparations, we must tax-back some reparations.
     
  10. blkbutterfly41

    blkbutterfly41 Banned MEMBER

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    Excellent post and good information. ^5 !! We have to examines china's entire system. And you are absolutely right. Only a few gains economically and the masses do not. Taking a look at chinas population . The masses are in worst shape then us. However, that's not to say we can't gain from some of their methods.

     
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