Black History Culture : CHEERING THE ANCESTORS HOME: AFRICAN IDEOGRAMS IN AFRICAN AMER. CEMETARIES

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Isaiah, May 11, 2005.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
    Messages:
    3,210
    Likes Received:
    62
    Ratings:
    +62
    “America is not like a blanket — one piece of unbroken cloth, the same color, the same texture, the same size. America is more like a quilt — many pieces, many colors, many sizes all woven and held together by a common thread.” — The Rev. Jesse Jackson



    As Jackson infers, American culture is multi-faceted and derived from many disparate contributions. Each individual culture in the United States brings its own aesthetic and thus becomes a part of this country’s complex quilt. Signs of African cultural heritage and tradition are often subtle and may appear to be decorative.
    The religious traditions of Africans forced to journey to America can be seen in the objects and symbols that remain in African American cemeteries today. These artifacts suggest the strong and vibrant history of a people, who, in spite of the adverse conditions of slavery, found ways to perpetuate their heritage. They were able to retain their family traditions and religious commitments to the deceased, either by iconography or by more direct representation. This aesthetic developed from combining (or creolizing) writing systems, the particular use of color and asymmetric forms, and the making of objects for daily use. Content was associated with religious beliefs.

    Marks and objects in cemeteries that look merely decorative to the uninformed eye may be African signs and symbols. This iconography in cemeteries can be divided into three categories: 1) sign systems of African origins, 2) secular objects as surrogates for ideograms and 3) revival of African traditions, interpreted in new ways. Examples of such African retentions (subconscious transmissions from prior generations) exist in burial grounds and established cemeteries, particularly in the Southern United States.

    CHECK OUT THE WEB SITE BELOW!


    http://www.folkart.org/mag/cemetery/cemetery.html

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  2. Bluewater

    Bluewater Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Messages:
    6,008
    Likes Received:
    44
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Praising The Lord
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    Ratings:
    +44
    Hi Isaiah
    This is very interesting; there is an African cemetery here in Baltimore. And the information you have shared with US has open my thoughts as well as my eyes. I will make plans to visit the cemetery here in Baltimore, and take notes that the pattern on the headstones means so much more
    Peace
     
  3. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2001
    Messages:
    34,804
    Likes Received:
    8,986
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    betwixt and between
    Ratings:
    +9,689
    Sister Blue ... it is sooooo good to see you ...

    my entire being has been warmed by your presence

    welcome home

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  4. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
    Messages:
    3,210
    Likes Received:
    62
    Ratings:
    +62
    This is in reference to culture

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  5. Keita Kenyatta

    Keita Kenyatta going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2004
    Messages:
    5,642
    Likes Received:
    3,328
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +3,383
    While I applaud Mr. Jackson in his attempted definition of America, I whole heartedly disagree. America may be held together by a common thread, but that thread is "White Domination" and is nothing we should be glad of or condone. Outside of the common thread called "white Domination" aka white supremacy, there is no common thread at all that any people willingly contributed to as if this was our home.
     
Loading...