Black People : CHARMAINE NEVILLE RAPED DURING DISASTER...

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Isaiah, Sep 17, 2005.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Whew, what can I say...except that this is a subject I've wanted to address here for a few months, now... The physical abuses by African men on African women... This story, along with too many others in the very recent past, has me on the edge...

    Seeing the New Orleans police chief in choking back tears as he described some of the horrors of rape and abuse of women and children in the Superdome, drove home a very terrible truth for me, and that is I believe African men's powerlessness in this world leads, and has lead, us to do some very horrific stuff to our sisters and our children... I mean, just this summer, my brother and I learned of the horror story that was our own mother's youth and abuse at the hands of my grandfather...

    It is an internal secret we have kept too long, and attempted to minimize by pointing the fingers at White men, as if that was an excuse to abuse Black women...Again, I will not preface our issues with a rebuke of White folks... I am talking about our actions as Black men toward Black women and children... I have known too many sisters who are carrying this weight around - some of whom may very well post to this board... I think it is time we dealt with this issue for the purposes of healing our souls, man...


    http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/columns/pressingissues_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1001057076


    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  2. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Charmaine Neville's New Orleans Story: Horror and Heroism

    The singer's five days in hell. It is just one more tale -- although one of the most horrific -- that everyone ought to ponder in considering which officials and agencies failed in their hurricane rescue and relief mission, from the top down, in a depraved disregard for life.
    By Greg Mitchell

    (September 07, 2005) -- Every time you think you've heard it all about the horrors of New Orleans in the past week, something like Charmaine Neville's experience comes around the bend, or the blog, and smacks you over the head like a club. It's a story of dead babies in the water, alligators eating people, heroism (she commandeered a bus to save dozens) and despair (she was raped).

    Yes, she is a singer and one of the famous Nevilles. Her father, Charles Neville, performs with uncles Aaron, Art and Cyril in the Neville Brothers band. The Boston Globe has declared that there are "simply no limits to her skills," and The New York Times said she "electrifies audiences." As a frequent visitor to New Orleans, and a JazzFest attendee, I know the Nevilles’ work well. But that connection matters little when you consider her story.

    It is just one more tale -- although surely one of the most horrific -- that everyone ought to ponder in considering exactly which officials and agencies failed in their rescue and relief responsibilities, from the top down, in a depraved disregard for life.

    As far as I can tell, Charmaine's story first appeared in print earlier this week in The Advocate of Baton Rouge. It is just starting to make the rounds of the Web (such as at Daily Kos) in an even more powerful form -- a six-minute video that appeared on Baton Rouge TV station WAFB. Here, she speaks to a priest or minister, shortly after her rescue and relocation to that city, where she was reunited with her young son.

    To really feel her story in all its dimensions, you have to watch the tape. (It's found here http://www.wafb.com/Global/SearchResults.asp?qu=charmaine+neville&x=14&y=13.) But her saga in a crude nutshell goes something like this:

    Neville makes, or made, her home on Pauline Street in New Orleans' poverty-stricken Ninth Ward. When the hurricane warnings came, she, like many of her neighbors, felt she did not have the resources to flee. She had no money, no car, so she barricaded herself in the house, with an elderly man, and prayed.

    Barely surviving the storm, she found shelter at the school across the street from her home. In a flat-bottom boat she helped rescue nearby residents, including stranded policemen. With a crowbar, she smashed a hole in the roof so people could climb to safety. For the next day or two, she waded back and forth in waist-deep water to bring food and drinking water to the growing number of people in the school, but conditions worsened and desperation grew by the hour.

    Neville and others tried to get the attention of helicopters from the school's roof. Time after time they signaled for helicopters to help them but there weren’t nearly enough in the air. And they dropped no food or water, either. "We couldn't understand why they couldn’t help us,” she says on the video. The National Guard, she recalls bitterly, was absent.

    "When we realized they weren't going to pick us up, we had to leave," she told The Advocate. "So we just started walking, in water, with dead bodies, and fish this big, and alligators, filth, trash. The smell was horrible."

    On the video tape she gets more specific: There must have been hundreds of bodies in the water. Some of them were babies. The alligators were chomping on bodies. Gangs and looters descended. Old ladies and children were raped, herself included. Others were murdered.

    Some of her neighbors committed suicide, she said: "Because nobody was coming to help them, they were killing themselves. Some people that just went crazy." Helicopters would pass over and "we would do the SOS on our flashlights" but they never stopped. Thousands were still trapped in their homes -- old, young, pregnant, children. Some men fired guns as choppers approached, but they "weren't trying to hit the helicopters. They figured maybe they weren't seeing us. Maybe if they heard this gunfire, they would stop, but that didn't help us."

    On the video she continues, "I want people to understand is that if we had not been left down there like the animals that they were treating us like, all of those things wouldn't have happened."

    At first, Neville thought her group could find refuge at the Superdome or the Convention Center. She escorted dozens, including "two old women in wheelchairs with no legs," to dry ground in the French Quarter, but didn't find any help there, either.

    Finally at the French Market, Neville spotted a city bus. She broke a window to get in, and though she had never driven a bus before, she loaded up dozens of people, some in wheelchairs, and took off. “And we drove and we drove,” she says on the tape, bursting into tears, “and millions of people were trying to get me to help them to get on the bus with them ...."

    After she found shelter in a Baptist church, this Neville sister was evacuated to Baton Rouge. "There are many, many heroes that have come out this,” she told The Advocate. “People talk about what I did. I didn't do nothing. Everybody did something."

    Referring to getting raped, Neville said, "What he took from me was nothing, because he can't take my spirit, he can't take my soul. My soul is New Orleans."

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    http://www.elfis.net/phorum/read.php?f=40&i=77&t=77




    Pax!
    Isaiah
     
  3. Nita

    Nita Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  4. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Women, children sexually abused after tsunami

    The following is an article about the many cases of sexual assault during last year's Tsunami in Asia:

    http://www.washtimes.com/upi-breaking/20050104-034636-5421r.htm

    I wanted to point this out for a reason. I a bore rape! I think it is one of the greatest crimes against mankind (women). As a father of a little girl (in addition to being a husband), I am particularly saddened about hearing these women violated. However I caution against putting out the perception that these crimes are indicative of violence against African women by African men. The truth is there is a criminal element in our community (the same criminal element that exists in all communities). During times of tragedy, this criminal element takes advantage of people’s vulnerability to exploits easy targets. As we can see during the Tsunami, criminals behave the same in similar conditions. I can guarantee that if there was a similar flood in Beverly Hills or Iceland, there would be reports of rapes & looting. It is natural for predators to prey on the weak! The fact is that those who are guilty of raping women & children need to be brought to justice. Outside of that, this can be a lesson for us to stop glorifying criminals. It is obvious that they are not heroes, nor someone to look up to. The people they exploit & victims are the same ones who protect them and turn a blind eye to their crimes.
     
  5. karmashines

    karmashines Banned MEMBER

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    If the National guardsmen had come when they were supposed to, the 'criminal element' wouldn't have had an opportunity to wreak havoc as they did. Reading things like this just makes me more pissed off at our government.

    But overall, pan is right... this type of thing happens to every race and culture during a natural diaster.
     
  6. Akilah

    Akilah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Modern day Sodom & Gomorrha

    There was and is no exscuse for either the Tsunami
    or Katrina victims to turn on their fellow citizens,
    indeed, the most vulnerable victims, in such
    a ruthless and despicable manner.
    If that is "human nature"... then
    we as human beings are truly LOST.

    Hotepu ~
     
  7. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    i do not think that is human nature, i think it is the devil operating.
    the rolling stones have an old song called sympathy for the devil which says that during time of calamity the devil comes out and rides high.
    what this shows to me is that men need an internal system of morality that will operate no matter if there is law enforcement or not.
     
  8. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    that is a lesson to come out of this mess.
    we don't need no thugs, we need some men.
     
  9. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Brother Pan and Sister Karmashines, in fairness, this post was really not JUST about the chaos that ensued a natural disaster in New Orleans... It certainly prompted me to consider the whole idea of addressing the issue with members of this board, but the problem in our communities is larger than that...

    We know this, and it really does us, and particularly BLACK WOMEN an injustice to start explaining it away, and chalking it up to human nature... It is NOT no human nature for men to RAPE women and children - not even during a disaster! That is why most of the brothers in New Orleans were busy trying to ensure the survival of their women and their children... That is why you and I would've been in that mode brother Pan...

    Rape is not no crime of passion, it is a vicious and brutal assault on the less powerful... It is a means by which an extremely frustrated, alienated, and disempowered human being vents his frustration, and acts out his fantasies of power... How can we say that the raping of a child is a crime of passion??? How can we say that THAT kind of behaviour is human nature????

    Actually, long before there was a National Disaster in New Orleans, African men around this country were guilty of taking our frustrations out on our women and children. It is a theme dealt with in a bunch of novels by some of our great writers, like Toni Morrison, Richard Wright, Alice Walker, and Ralph Ellison... It is a subject which I have had to deal with as regards many sisters whom I've dated, and as I mentioned, most recently, allegations concerning someone extremely close to me, my own mother...

    It is a dirty secret which which has existed within our communities for a long time, and even a Septima Clarke and an Ella Baker had to deal with during the Civil Rights Movement... It is so damned dirty that it took me years to honestly confront it... It is so hard to accept because we are constantly assaulted with the message that we are a dysfunctional group, and such truths only seem to substantiate accusations.

    Of course, the reality, as you pointed out, is that men of ALL ETHNICITIES engage in this behaviour toward women... Does this, however, make engaging in this kind of behaviour cool??? Does it mean that African men catch some kind of a "hardship" exemption from culpability ??? Brother Pan, my grandfather and my mother weren't no Sri Lankans, no Nepalese, or Indonesians... And neither were Charmaine Neville, and those sisters and children in the Superdome... That's who I am concerned with, selfish as it sounds.... I want US to be able to say that WE treat AFRICAN WOMEN better than any group of women in the world... Can we say that now??? Will we ever get to that if we are going to sweep stuff under the rug in order NOT to acknowledge the wrong-doings in our communities???


    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  10. Steve69

    Steve69 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I think part of the problem is we dont want to admit the problem. That a much higher % of black men comit rape compared to other races. This reminds me of a news report that I read.
    It said South Africa was the only place where women buy rape insurance. And that by age 50 the average women can expect to have been raped twice.
    With more children and single parents they dont get the teaching of moral standards. How can you raise more kids on the same budjet and with one parent and expect the same quality. More effort needs to be put on the moral standards and quality of raising children and we not be afraid to bring up or admit this problem.
     
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